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  • Spout
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    TIFF11: "The Good Son" Is an Ambiguous and Acerbic Heir to "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?"

    A well-crafted drama can frighten as much as any good slasher flick. I think one could even argue that there’s already a distinct genre out there populated by dysfunctional families, deeply unsettling metaphor and shockingly unconventional violence. Claustrophobic, sporadically bombastic, and chillingly understated, these living room thrillers are often initially quite divisive yet often seem to find longevity. “Dogtooth” comes to mind, along with “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” Zaida Bergroth’s “The Good Son” is one of these films.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Torchwood: Miracle Day, Episode 10, The Blood Line, SEASON FINALE

    Torchwood: Miracle Day, Episode 10, The Blood Line, SEASON FINALE

    David Chute bids Torchwood: Miracle Day a fond farewell. Honestly.An antipodal cleft pierces the earth, along a line drawn from Shanghai to Buenos Aires. Into this cleft the blood of an immortal (you know who) is introduced, and it has to be at both poles simultaneously. The effect of this transfusion is to re-jigger the polarity of the cleft, reconfiguring the force field it generates, toggling a morphic resonator switch that had the effect of making everyone who was mortal at that moment immortal and vice versa -- meaning that Y.K.W. became mortal, because he was immortal to begin with and the polarity had been flipped. Are e clear so far?

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    More: Reviews, TV
  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    TIFF: Moneyball Review Round-Up

    The movie I was most looking forward to seeing at Toronto, based on the source material (Michael Lewis's baseball Oakland As expose) and talent involved (Bennett Miller directing a script by Aaron Sorkin and Steve Zaillian and stars Brad Pitt and Jonah Hill) was Moneyball (September 23). And while the movie has its lags and lulls--like baseball--I was not disappointed. In fact the movie is more naturalistic and lackadaisical than I was expecting. Miller allows his actors--especially great reactor Hill--and the game, to breathe. Pitt is easygoing and comfortable in the role of Oakland As general manager Billy Beane, and Miller's Oscar-winning Capote star Philip Seymour Hoffman is perfect as the taciturn As manager who stubbornly uses the players he chooses--until Beane just as firmly takes them away from him.

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  • The Playlist
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    First Look: Woody Harrelson Proves NWA Had A Point In New Clips From 'Rampart'

    Tonight is the world premiere of "Rampart," currently showing without a distributor at the Toronto International Film Festival. Anticipation is high for Oren Moverman's highly-anticipated follow-up to the excellent "The Messenger," and while Woody Harrelson nabbed a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nomination for that role, three new clips courtesy of THR showcase Harrelson as the lead in what we figured was an intriguing ensemble piece. The film is a period piece that showcases the repercussions of the L.A. Riots on an embattled former Vietnam vet struggling with the responsibilities of the badge, and trying to balance his sanity and questionable on-the-job morals. Moverman's co-writer on the project, which is based on a true story, was none other than legendary crime novelist James Ellroy.

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  • The Playlist
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    Domestic Preview For 'Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy' Is A Thicker Trailer, Bolder, Fly

    Check out these slick-looking dudes in the "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy" trailer. No one trusts anyone, no one is comfortable even walking around the corner, and everyone's got some sort of wicked coat. This feels like the sort of paranoid drunken nightmare someone has after passing out underneath a pile of GQ magazines in a smoking jacket. The John le Carré adaptation debuted earlier in the week at the Venice Film Festival, where we called it "incredibly rich and perfectly constructed," comments we're usually receiving, not giving, and opens in the U.K. next Friday, but the new clip is the first targeted at a U.S. audience.

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  • Spout
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    TIFF11: The Best Kind of Nostalgia, "From Up On Poppy Hill" Charms Us Back to Japan's Youth

    Yesterday, shortly after coming out of “From Up On Poppy Hill,” I tweeted that the film was cute but had a somewhat slight storyline. Then I spent a few minutes thinking about it and realized that cute and slight aren’t necessarily the right words at all. It seems Ebert is right about all the laptops: to really process a good film one needs a little time.

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  • The Playlist
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    Dave Franco, Analeigh Tipton, Cory Hardrict Set To Be 'Warm Bodies'

    While we're fans of Johnathan Levine, director of the recent "50/50," we're in wait-and-see mode regarding "Warm Bodies," the zombie romance the helmer is currently filming. He's got Nicolas Hoult and Teresa Palmer as the very pretty lead duo, with Hoult as a love-struck zombie in pursuit of a human female companion. Rob Corddry and John Malkovich have also been cast, but it seems the new, youthful additions of Dave Franco, Analeigh Tipton and Cory Hardrict to the cast clarify the "Twilight" angle of this premise, based on a novel described as " 'Twilight' meets 'Shaun of the Dead.' "

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Reading Of The Award-Winning Screenplay "Die Enormous" By kA'RAMUU KUSH With Jamie Hector And More

    I've just been informed director kA'RAMUU KUSH just won the screenplay competition at the Harlem International Film Festival currently taking place in New York for his screenplay Die Enormous, a roller-coaster script I was lucky enough to read and thoroughly enjoyed.

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  • The Playlist
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    Poster For TIFF Documentary 'Patron Saints' Channels Gwyneth In 'Contagion'

    Look Away, Gwyneth, LOOK AWAY!We've heard a bit of buzz coming out of TIFF about the documentary feature "Patron Saints," the first feature from the filmmaking team Brian M. Cassidy and Melanie Shatzky. The film centers on life at a nursing home, following the experience of one resident in particular. It's been described as unorthodox, hyperrealistic, lyrical, unsettling and even tinged with black humor. It definitely sounds like an intense experience and unlike anything we've seen before.

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  • Women and Hollywood
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    Toronto Day 3- We Need to Talk About Kevin and Think of Me

    I woke up thinking about Tilda Swinton's blank face from We Need to Talk About Kevin. It is amazing how much expressiveness there can be in a blank stare. The movie directed bravely by Lynne Ramsey is an adaptation of the Lionel Shriver novel of the same name. Like Ramsey, Shriver is not a shy artist and her book The Post Birthday World is one of my all time favorites.

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