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  • Caryn James
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    Pie-Throwing and Political Theater: The Murdochs Testify in the NOTW Scandal (Video)

    What a difference a pie in the face makes. You’d have to go back to Bill Clinton’s live, televised deposition during the Lewinsky scandal to find television quite as gripping as the testimony of James and Rupert Murdoch’s before Parliament in the News of the World phone-hacking scandal – and that was before it turned crazy-slapstick with an attempt to toss a pie at Rupert, an act overshadowed by his wife Wendi’s flying leap at the attacker. (Actually the attacker threw a plate of foam, but it was a pie-in-the-face moment; watch the video below.)

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  • The Playlist
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    Cameron Crowe Says 'We Bought A Zoo' Soundtrack Won't Necessarily Feature Neil Young Or Eddie Vedder

    But Does Confirm It Will Likely Be Heavy On One Or Two ArtistsOne down, two to go. It's been a helluva busy year for director Cameron Crowe. He's already delivered one film, his Elton John documentary "The Union" and with five and a half months to go before the end of 2011, he will deliver two more movies. First, his long in the works Pearl Jam documentary "Pearl Jam Twenty" will premiere at the Venice Film Festival before hitting the "American Masters" series on PBS in October that will be followed by a DVD release. And then, just in time for the holidays, the director will drop his first feature film in six years, the dramedy "We Bought A Zoo." Based on the memoir by Benjamin Mee, with a script from “The Devil Wears Prada” writer Aline Brosh McKenna, the story follows Mee (Matt Damon), a single father who attempts to fulfill his late wife’s wish of moving their family to the titular animal sanctuary. Damon is joined by a solid ensemble that includes Scarlett Johansson, Thomas Haden Church, Angus MacFadyen, Elle Fanning, Patrick Fugit, John Michael Higgins and J.B. Smoove.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Watch: Director Alrick Brown Reacts To Selection Of His Debut "Kinyarwanda" For AFFRM Release #2

    As already announced, Alrick Brown's 2011 Sundance award-winner Kinyarwanda will be the 2nd film to be distributed theatrically via AFFRM (the African-American Film Festival Releasing Movement). In the just-released video clip below, director Brown reacts to the news.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Director George Tillman Jr. Helming Story On The Worst Boxer Of All Time And Jennifer Hudson Project

    This story is a little different. According to Variety, director George Tillman Jr. (Soul Food, Men Of Honor, Notorious) is preparing to direct an untitled project about Peter Buckley, aka "the worst boxer of all time."

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Exclusive Interview with 9th Wonder docu THE WONDER YEAR director Kenneth Price

    In anticipation of ActNow: New Voices in Black Cinema's NYC premiere of the 9th Wonder documentary movie THE WONDER YEAR next Thursday July 28th, a feature film series that both I and Tambay curate, I'm proud to present ActNow's blogger Tanya St. Louis' interview with the film's director Kenneth Price:

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  • Spout
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    Documentary Classics: "Stevie" is a Brilliant Consideration of Family and Filmmaking Responsibility

    I've been wanting to start up a column on documentary classics for a while now but couldn't decide what film to start with. Yesterday I watched Steve James' "Stevie" for the first time, and -- oh yeah -- this is the one. Less than ten years old, it might seem too new a film to be considered a "classic." Docs tend to age a lot quicker than fiction films, though, with only a few years needed to determine if they're permanent must-see works or momentary imperatives that quickly become outdated. A more obvious and easy choice would be James' "Hoop Dreams," and certainly it deserves a discussion here in the future. However, I partly wish to recommend lesser known films requiring more attention, either than what they received to begin with or than they have had since.

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  • The Playlist
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    Review: 'World On A Wire' Is A Long Lost Rainer Werner Fassbinder Oddity Worthy Of Reconsideration

    Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s “World on a Wire,” a once-thought-lost, nearly-four-hour-long sci-fi epic about the nature of reality and the ways in which we lose ourselves in that potentially futile quest, was made way back in 1973 and for that reason alone, it’s hard not to goggle in awe at how ahead of its time it was, even when it very nearly bores you to death.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Naomie Harris Signs On For South African Drama "A Green And Quiet River"

    Managing to keep herself busy, in the face of recent claims of the lack of employment in the UK for black British actors, Naomie Harris is attached to star in the French production of a drama titled A Green And Quiet River, alongside Peter Sarsgaard, Ciaran Hinds, and others, with Alain Choquart directing,his feature film debut.

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    More: casting
  • The Playlist
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    Blake Masters To Rewrite 'Colossus' Remake for Universal; Ron Howard & Will Smith Presumably Move On

    Whether it be the success of the insipid "Transformers" franchise, or perhaps Hollywood just has a crippling artificial intelligence neurosis, there are a whole lot of movies about robots going wild on their way to cinemas. From "King of Kong" director Seth Gordon's proposed "WarGames" remake to Steven Spielberg's on the horizon "Robocalypse," if the next few years don't make us scared of technological change, nothing will.

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  • Caryn James
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    Lisa Kudrow’s Brilliant "Web Therapy" on Showtime: Bigger, Longer, Should Have Been Cut

    This is therapy as it ought to be: three minutes long, by web-cam so you don’t have to leave your house, dispensing with all that dead-end foolishness about “dreams and feelings.” Voila. You have what Fiona Wallice (created to perfection by Lisa Kudrow) calls in her mincingly precise voice “a new treatment modality.” If only it worked.

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    More: TV Reviews