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  • Jared Moshé's Blog
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    Choose Your Poison

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  • The Playlist
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    Review: 'Peep World' Gathers A Promising Cast And Does Nothing With Them

    Word on the IFC-distributed comedy "Peep World" has been enormously quiet, even for those who scour for the latest in upcoming indies. With a cast consisting of Michael C. Hall, Sarah Silverman, Rainn Wilson, Judy Greer, Kate Mara, Ronn Rifkin, and Lesley Ann Warren flying under the radar like this without any buzz, it can't be a good thing. Barry W. Blaustein's second foray into narrative filmmaking (his first was, and let us never forget it, "The Ringer") is devoid of what makes comedy films work, including the whole "making the audience laugh" part.

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  • The Playlist
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    Lily Collins Offered The Part Of Stormy Llewellyn In 'Odd Thomas'

    Emma Roberts, Kat Dennings, Portia Doubleday & Addison Timlin Were Also On The ShortlistWe nearly forgot this movie was happening, but there is fresh movement on "Odd Thomas" the next film from Stephen Sommers, and it looks Anton Yelchin -- announced last month to star in the film -- has found his leading lady.

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  • Eric Kohn
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    D.A. Pennebaker Discusses Richard Leacock and Leonard Bernstein.

    Yesterday's obituary for documentary icon Richard Leacock included quotes from some of the people he affected in his life who have since obtained influence roles in film culture, including Mira Nair, Albert Maysles and D.A. Pennebaker. That last source, the director of such cinema verité classics as "Don't Look Back," ran the production company Leacock-Pennebaker for several years, and shared a number of remarkable anecdotes about meeting and working with Leacock during the early stages of their careers. In the following excerpt, Pennebaker recalls his experience with Leacock during the production of "Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic in Moscow" in 1958. Bernstein was a friend of Leacock's in Harvard, but that didn't keep the documentarian from applying a true hands-on approach to the shooting process.

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  • The Playlist
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    Pics & Clip From ‘Confession Of A Child Of The Century’ With Pete Doherty & Charlotte Gainsbourg

    Producers Crowdsourcing Funding To Help Finish The FilmYep, believe it or not, Brit rocker bad boy Pete Doherty is taking his rugged charm to the big screen and he will have Charlotte Gainsbourg at his side to steer him in the right direction. First announced late last year, "The Confession Of A Child Of The Century" will find the pair firmly in period pic costuming and Cinema Teaser has some first look pictures as well as a behind the scenes video from the film's production.

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  • Women and Hollywood
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    Women at the Box Office This Weekend - March 25

    Women Centric Films OpeningMiral - written by Rula JebrealPotiche: reviewSucker Punch: What the Hell is Abbie Cornish Doing in Sucker PunchWomen Directed Films OpeningMy Perestroika - directed by Robin Hessman

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  • SydneysBuzz
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    Gun Hill Road

    I am finally catching up with some of what I missed at Sundance -- just in time for Cannes!. This one I had heard about from a acting school colleague of Rashaad before Sundance was announced. Now I have finally seen the film! Wow! It is so strong and uncompromising, I actually had a tough time staying with these characters, so strongly into their own world were they. The realism of their characters, flaws and strengths, the realism of those rough South Bronx streets, the grittiness and proximity were palpable. This film will remain with me for a long time to come. Esai Morales and Judy Reyes were great. And the young man...who is he? Even IMDb didn’t help me find him as I forgot his name in the film. What a sweet and beautiful young man. All the actors were good, even the supporting roles, especially of the nemisis, Sugar, played by Robert Salzman, who must have done something as horrendous as what our hero, Enrique, fears in his own son. Enrique's steadfast and unquestionable machismo made Esai Morales' figure positively tragic. The video here speaks with Robert Salzman's own voice and makes you understand how he was able to play the role of the convict/ ex-con Sugar:Director Rashaad Ernesto Green started his own his career as an actor and has a natural feel for the actors. A New York native, he received his BA from Dartmouth College, MFA from the NYU Graduate Acting Program, and will graduate this May from NYU's Graduate Film Program. After spending three years acting in theaters nationwide and working with directors such as Spike Lee, Rashaad worked as a teacher in the South Bronx before moving behind the camera to tell stories. Rashaad was included on the latest edition of Filmmaker Magazine’s elite 25 New Faces of Independent Film list as well as indieWIRE's 2009 Top Ten New Voices in Cinema. Gun Hill Road's Rashaad Ernesto Green, courtesy of Sundance InstituteThe world premiere of Rashaad’s film Premature won the Grand Jury Prize in the HBO Short Film Competition at the 2008 American Black Film Festival, is currently airing on HBO and has played over 40 festivals worldwide, including Palm Springs International Shortfest, Munich International Film Festival, Sapporo International Film Festival of Japan, has broadcast in England, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Poland, Kenya, Japan, and has garnered over 20 awards, including the Directors Guild of America Student Award and the National Board of Review Award. His short Choices premiered at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival, and his latest short Cuts has also screened on HBO. Selected for the 2010 Tribeca All Access Program, IFP’s Independent Film Week, and a recipient of the prestigious Princess Grace Foundation–Cary Grant Film Award, Rashaad recently completed his thesis feature film Gun Hill Road which premiered in the 2011 Sundance Film Festival U.S. Dramatic Competition. Gun Hill Road was picked up by U.S. distributor Motion Film Group and will be released early this summer.

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  • The Playlist
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    Review: Belgian Oscar Entry 'Illégal' A One-Note Take On The Issues Surrounding Immigration

    There is perhaps no political issue -- aside from health care maybe -- that stirs passions more than that of illegal immigration. Regardless of where you stand on the issue, it's undeniable that it's a complex one with ramifications that touch on education, the economy and yes, even the aforementioned health care. It's a thorny topic too, often rooted in personal experience, that it can be difficult to view it from any objective angle. But for director Olivier Masset-Depasse, there is no doubt where his sympathies lie and in "Illégal," Belgium's official foreign film selection for last year's Oscars, he makes his case with all the subtlety of a man pounding his fist on the table.

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  • The Playlist
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    'Face/Off' Duo Nicolas Cage & John Travolta Looking To Reunite On A Pair Of Projects

    Let's face it. Nicolas Cage isn't so much a movie star anymore as a continual riff on his own persona, selling movie after movie on his crazy-wigged eccentricity and personality. The idea of him playing characters has long gone out the window as these days, he pretty much just plays Nic Cage whether in a medieval flick like "Season Of The Witch" or a 3D throwaway B-movie like "Drive Angry." Meanwhile, John Travolta has been vacillating between dumb family fare like "Wild Hogs" or "Old Dogs" while trying to scowl convincingly as a bad guy in action flicks like "The Taking Of Pelham 1 2 3" and "From Paris With Love." Wherever their careers are now, the duo teamed up to deliver one of the great, big dumb, yet totally awesome action flicks of the 1990s, John Woo's "Face/Off" so it's a little exciting (in a nostalgic sort of way) that the two are looking team up again.

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  • The Playlist
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    Review: 'Potiche' A Frothy, Fun Distraction

    French auteur Francois Ozon’s “Potiche” begins with a scene that seems straight out of a Disney movie; that is, if Sleeping Beauty were wearing a ‘70s-era tracksuit and she happened upon bunnies shagging like, well, bunnies. Catherine Deneuve’s Suzanne Pujol steadfastly treks through the woods, keeping her figure trim for her businessman husband as she composes poetry for the feathered and furry friends who surround her. But as Suzanne walks through an idyllic oasis and returns to her mansion, it becomes clear that her life is no fairy tale.

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