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  • The Playlist
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    Alexander Skarsgård Says His Dad Encouraged Him To Work With Lars Von Trier

    While Lars von Trier might get himself into trouble with everybody else and may have ruffled the feathers of Björk, who swore off acting after starring in "Dancer In the Dark," the Danish auteur has a small stable of actors who continue to return to his films. The promise of working on a set that is unlike anything else they will ever experience is a lure and coupled with the director's ambitious and at times outrageous concepts, it's just too good to resist. But for rising star Alexander Skarsgård, he received firsthand knowledge from someone very close to him who is one of von Trier's most frequent collaborators.

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  • The Playlist
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    'Chinatown' Scribe Robert Towne To Pen 'The Battle Of Britain'

    Robert Towne needs no introduction. The writer behind "Chinatown," "The Last Detail," "The Rock" and more is considered the master among screenwriters, and there are few other names on a script that bring as much reverence. So who better to pair up with a movie about one of the most famous fights of World War II?

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Watch Trailer For Poetic Documentary "Sonia Sanchez: Shake Loose Memories"

    Here's an insightful documentary that screened last month at the Urbanworld Film Festival. It's called Sonia Sanchez: Shake Loose Memories and is described as..."a musical and poetic journey through the life, art and activism of black arts movement icon, Sonia Sanchez."

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  • Spout
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    "Subway Preacher" is a Documentary to Have Faith In. See It Tonight in NYC.

    This weekend you might be drawn to George Clooney's "The Ides of March," a predictable political drama in which lust -- for both sex and power -- conquers idealism once again. By all means see it for Ryan Gosling's stiff performance, some immense close-ups on Clooney's pores and a surprisingly decent turn by Evan Rachel Wood. While you wait, though, let me recommend tonight's NYC premiere of Dennis W. Ho's documentary "Subway Preacher," which kicks off Exit Art's new Digimovies program as the center unveils a new cinema space (there's a bar there, fyi). The film unpredictably follows a born-again Christian pastor as temptations corrupt and complicate his ministry, which is located in the tunnels of a Manhattan subway station. Slight parallels can be drawn between "March" and "Preacher," but as they always say, truth is a far more interesting play of morals and compromised ideals than fiction.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Spielberg vs. Spielberg: Vulture Tracks How His Fave Themes Go Wrong on Small Screen

    Spielberg is all around these days, from summer hit Super 8, which J.J. Abrams sold on his name, to holiday tentpoles The Adventures of Tintin and Oscar frontrunenr War Horse. But there are two Spielbergs, posits Vulture, which lays out the Four Ways Steven Spielberg TV Shows Feel Like Bad Spielberg Knockoffs.

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  • The Playlist
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    Julia Stiles Lines Up David O. Russell's 'The Silver Linings Playbook'

    Chris Tucker Looking Likely As He Enters Final NegotiationsJulia Stiles' career has been a bit of an odd one. She's been working consistently ever since the late '90s/early aughts but never quite became a household name. In recent years, she's probably best known for her role in the 'Bourne' trilogy, "Mona Lisa Smile" and her turn on the last season of "Dexter." And while the actress can never be quite pegged down, we really didn't expect this bit of news.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    New Adventures of Tintin Trailer Rocks The Boat

    Check out the action-packed new trailer for The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn (December 25) below. Director Steven Spielberg and producer Peter Jackson talk their inspiration for the film here.Video: MSN Exclusive: The Adventures of Tintin - trailer

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Robert Downey Jr. Developing Perry Mason for the Big Screen; Listen & Watch Past Incarnations

    Yet another TV brand heads to the movies. Will they never learn? But the casting is choice in this case: Robert Downey Jr. may bring Perry Mason to the big screen through Warner Bros. and Team Downey. Like the original Erle Stanley Gardner books--there are 82; Downey and producer David Gambino are looking for a writer to adapt their own original story based on the character--the film would be set in 1930s Los Angeles and would follow defense attorney Mason, his secretary Della Street, private investigator Paul Drake and courtroom adversary Hamilton Burger.

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  • The Playlist
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    Jaimie Alexander & 'Friday Night Lights' Star Zach Gilford Will Make 'The Last Stand' With Arnie

    Frankly, we could do without another "The Terminator" movie even though Arnold Schwarzenegger still really wants to make one, but stuff like "The Last Stand" is really the sort of movies he should be making now. Low key, gritty and backed by the envelope pushing "I Saw The Devil" helmer Kim Ji-woon, this is the kind of fare will put his bastard child ways behind him, not some bloated "final" entry in a franchise that should have ended a long time ago. Anyway, this a long way of saying that Sif from "Thor" (aka Jaimie Alexander), and that guy from "Friday Night Lights" (aka Zach Gilford) are gonna back up the Governator in his next film.

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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    NYFF: Lars von Trier's "Melancholia"

    Towards the end of Lars von Trier’s Melancholia, the troubled—and, as strongly implied in a third-act revelation, clairvoyant—Justine (Kirsten Dunst) reflects on the earth’s imminent demise. “The earth is evil,” she observes, clearly the mouthpiece of her film’s notoriously provocative maker, “We don’t need to grieve for it.” Trier’s Melancholia has drawn many comparisons to another cosmic existential head trip that, like this film, debuted at Cannes 2011: Terrence Malick’s The Tree of Life. Their superficially similar structures are obvious. The former imagines, with despondent nihilism, the end of the world through the experience of a person uncommonly attuned to the worthlessness of living; the latter tries to make sense of death and human suffering by contemplating the origins of the universe and of life on earth, as well as the childhood of its protagonist. It should be stated on the outset, however, that Trier’s film is not the yin to Malick’s yang; it is its opposite. Read Chris Wisniewski's review of Melancholia.

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