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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Paul Mazursky is Vanity Fair's New Film Critic: Do Critics Matter?

    Vanity Fair editor Graydon Carter has made a smart move: he's giving veteran writer-director Paul Mazursky ("Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice," "Harry and Tonto")  an online gig as VF's film critic. Mazursky's first reviews are Lars von Trier's "Melancholia" and Clint Eastwood's "J. Edgar." (See snippets below.)

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Oscar Hell Week: Play By Play

    Exactly how did all the changes go down at the Oscars last week? Well, Academy president Tom Sherak gives us the play by play.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Flashback - Could An African American Filmmaker Make A Serious Film About Slavery?

    Back in July I asked this question on S & A and after a conversation I had with a friend earlier today about Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained I thought maybe it's time to revisit the question again. That is can a black filmmaker make a serious film about slavery?

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Weekly Wrap: Oscar Changes, AFM News, AFI, Tintin, Hugo, Haywire, Breaking Dawn Reviews and More

    BOX OFFICE, REVIEWS, TRAILERS Review: "Breaking Dawn - Part One" "Tintin": Review and New Trailer

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Filmmaker Dana Verde: Watch Short Film "Lock and Key" Plus Director's Reel

    New York filmmaker Dana Verde's resume goes back to 1998. She completed her B.A. in Media Studies/Screenwriting from New School University in 2002. In years 2003 and 2004, Verde was a finalist at the Sundance Screenwriters Lab. She also attended London Film School in the UK. Verde's inspiration comes from the likes of filmmakers Darren Aronosky, Woody Allen and Martin Scorsese.

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    More: Shorts
  • Shadow and Act
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    Imitation is The Sincerest Form of Flattery - Then Again Maybe NOT

    So this really has nothing to do with black film or telelvision or theater but everything to do with black images and how they're portrayed in the media which is what in essence we're all about. Just watch the video. It explains itself and we're looking forward for your comments of which I'm guessing will be many.

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  • The Playlist
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    Director & Actress Rie Rasmussen Says Quentin Tarantino's 'Django Unchained' Will "Revolutionize" Hollywood

    Earlier this week, The Playlist spoke with Rie Rasmussen, the model-turned-actress-turned writer/director/editor/producer. Best known to American audiences for her steamy makeout scene with Rebecca Romjin-Stamos in Brian De Palma’s “Femme Fatale,” Rasmussen has in recent years been carving out a new career behind the lens. Her short film, “Thinning the Herd,” traveled the festival circuit (and was up for a Palme d'Or at Cannes), and that was where the multitalented beauty first caught the eye of Quentin Tarantino.

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  • ReelPolitik
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    Oscar's Issues: Doc Noms Could Raise Awareness for Society's Ills, Injustices

    Forget Best Picture or Best Actor, the Oscar for Best Documentary may be the Academy Awards' most important and influential. Consider the platform it gave to the problems of global warming when "An Inconvenient Truth" won the top prize. Or the media ruckus that Michael Moore caused when he rallied against George W. Bush and the war in Iraq. Or more recently, the way "Gasland" raised awareness about fracking. It's nice for anyone to win an award, but how many films can say they influenced the national discourse?

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  • The Playlist
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    The Films Of Lars von Trier: A Retrospective

    What with all his provocations and (usually) self-manufactured controversies, it's sometimes easy to forget that Lars von Trier is a truly gifted filmmaker, who yes, is a prankster and trickster as well, but also a man who imbues his characters with a rich sensitivity, even if the conditions they face can be cruel and harsh. Not all his films are masterpieces, but he's been turning heads at home and abroad for getting on 30 years now with films like "Europa," "Dancer in the Dark," "Breaking the Waves" and "Dogville" making some of the biggest waves internationally. Never easy watches, but always rewarding, he's slowly been assembling one of the most interesting back catalogues in recent memory -- ranging from period dramas to musicals to comedies -- even if accusations of misogyny and misanthropy aren't easily dismissable.

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  • The Lost Boys
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    The Opposite of Dogville?

    The Danish poster for "The Help":

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