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  • The Playlist
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    Guillermo Del Toro Says $150 Million 'Mountains' Budget Was Approved By Universal

    Filmmaker Still Seems Unclear Why Universal Walked Away From Project, "I Am As Puzzled As Most People Are" & More Learned From Extensive InterviewJust days after Universal canned Guillermo del Toro's long-gestating dream project "At the Mountains of Madness," the director is now opening up about what happened behind the scenes and the biggest takeaway is he's as surprised and shocked as we are.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Fandor Streams Indie Video: Sundance Meets Netflix

    Fandor Streams Indie Video: Sundance Meets Netflix

    Finally, the promise of streaming movies has become a practical reality, from Amazon to Netflix. But as multiple indie sites come and go (from Jaman and Mubi to Spout), on the eve of SXSW, a new indie site launches Wednesday, Fandor, that promises a better subscription indie streaming service via its website and Facebook. For $10 a month, you can browse, sample, clip and stream its library of 2500 films, from Fritz Lang and Maya Deren classics to Alex Cox and Derek Jarman indies or Sundance docs. (Shorts are in the mix too, especially as a mobile app comes online.)

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  • The Playlist
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    Watch: Hilariously Awful Trailer For 'Things Fall Apart' That Movie 50 Cent Lost All That Weight For

    If you want to be taken seriously as an actor, the quickest route to success is to gain/lose a bunch of weight and/or lose your hair. 50 Cent has done both, but don't expect anyone to come calling around awards season time.

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  • Peter Bogdanovich
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    ALPHAVILLE

    “Sometimes reality is too complex for oral communication,” says the gurgling, gravelly-sounding computer voice at the start of Jean-Luc Godard’s 1965 iconoclastic science-fiction detective picture, Alphaville (available on DVD). “But,” the voice continues, “legend enhances it in a form which enables it to spread all over the world.” Film, of course, is a modern form of legend, so Godard sets his course pretty clearly at the outset. After that, you’re on your own.

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  • The Playlist
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    Review: 'Kill The Irishman' But Spare The Movie

    The true story of Danny Greene is not without intrigue or plot twists. The Irish dockworker first became a union head before seeking less savory work as a mob hitman. Like many before and after him, Greene earned the ire of those around him by trying to use his reputation as a negotiation tool, seeing the endless benefits of his experience mixed with an entrepreneurial know-how. Unlike others before him, organized crime didn’t know exactly what to do with the self-proclaimed “Celtic Warrior” and efforts to snuff him out were for naught. Judging by historical record, the Irishman seemed very much bulletproof.

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  • The Playlist
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    Sylvester Stallone Won't Be Writing Or Directing 'The Expendables 2'

    Call it mad genius or a stroke of luck, but Sylvester Stallone seemed to have found a cinematic scratch that wasn't being itched when he got together a bunch of aging action stars, put them in a movie he co-wrote and directed, and smiled to himself as "The Expendables" went on and snatched up $275 million in global box office receipts. Not too bad. And while the actor/director/writer has long talked up his sequel to the film -- even before the first one was released -- it looks like for the next entry in the franchise, Stallone is going to take a step back.

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  • The Playlist
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    Story Of The Deepwater Horizon Oil Rig Explosion Being Turned Into A Movie

    Frankly, we're surprised it took as long as it did for this to happen, but Deadline reports that Summit Entertainment, Participant Media and Imagenation Abu Dhabi have teamed up and optioned "Deepwater Horizon's Final Hour" to turn into a big screen movie.

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  • Spout
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    Does Comedy Age Better Than Drama?

    Last week at the Film Comment Selects screening of "Burke and Hare," director John Landis addressed the fact that many of his movies are now considered classics in spite of the fact they were poorly received critically in their time. I don't think the same would be true if those movies he's talking about were dramas. Say "Spies Like Us" was a badly reviewed Cold War thriller rather than a wacky buddy spy comedy. Would it be as well-remembered 26 years later? I doubt it. Certainly that film's box office success has something to do with its aging well, but what about "Three Amigos," which didn't perform as well?

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  • The Playlist
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    Juliette Binoche Talks The Emotional Intensity Of 'Certified Copy'

    One of our favorite pictures of the 2010 festival season was Abbas Kiarostami's "Certified Copy," a rich and deeply layered film that wasn't only unlike anything the filmmaker had done before, but a completely unique experience that explored the various facets and stages of a romantic relationship in both a welcoming and experimental way. The film follows a couple through the Tuscan countryside as they discuss love, life and art amidst a relationship that has/is crumbling, while the exact nature of their relationship is playfully never quite clear. We recently spoke with lead actress, legendary French actress Juliette Binoche about her work on the film and navigating the enigmatic tone of the movie.

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  • SydneysBuzz
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    The Berlinale is Much More Than a Film Festival

    The best summation of the festival itself was the New York Times article by Dennis Lim which contextualizes the festival and its films:

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