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  • Shadow and Act
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    Slamdance 2012 - Keith Miller's Meditative Docu-Drama "Welcome to Pine Hill" Wins Grand Jury Award

    The Slamdance Film Festival doesn't get as much *shine* as the Sundance Film Festival, even though they both take place in Park City, UT, and at almost exactly the same time.

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    More: Awards
  • Press Play
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    FESTIVALS: Rotterdam dispatch #1: How to find the next big director in 10 minutes

    This is the first of (hopefully) several dispatches from Press Play Editor Kevin B. Lee at the Rotterdam Film Festival. A full festival wrap-up with highlights will appear at RogerEbert.com.

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  • The Playlist
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    Monty Python Members Reunite To Voice Aliens In Terry Jones' Comedy 'Absolutely Anything'; Robin Williams Also Involved

    It's been nearly thirty years since the members of Monty Python appeared on screen together in "The Meaning of Life." Thanks to most of the group feeling it was the weakest of their film outings, long-standing fissures in the group, and resistance by John Cleese in particular to a possible sequel to "Monty Python and the Holy Grail," Monty Python have never since worked on the same project since. That said, members have teamed on various projects over the years -- all the surviving members (Graham Chapman having passed in 1989) except Terry Gilliam appeared in Terry Jones' "The Wind In The Willows" in 1996, while there have been a few on-stage reunions, generally with one or more members absent.

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  • Women and Hollywood
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    Maiwenn's Poliss Scores 13 Cesar Nominations Including Best Director and Best Picture

    The Maiwenn directed film Poliss scored the most Cesar nominations -- 13 --  including best picture, best screenplay and best director. 

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  • The Playlist
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    Julie Delpy Says She's "Done With Acting"; Still Just Thinking About Third 'Before Sunset' Film

    Over the last decade or so, French star Julie Delpy has been a relatively rare presence on screen. Sure, there have been a few appearances -- Lasse Hallstrom's "The Hoax" and Jim Jarmusch's "Broken Flowers" among them -- but for the most part, when she's starred in a film, it's been in pictures that she's written and directed, like "The Countess," "Le Skylab," "2 Days In Paris" and "2 Days In New York," the sequel which just premiered at Sundance.

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  • The Playlist
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    Megan Ellison One-Ups Sly Stallone, Guarantees An R-Rating For Next 'Terminator' Film

    Let's face it. Even if you weren't a fan of the first "Expendables" film, the normally fan-friendly Sylvester Stallone spit in the face of his fans, declaring "Expendables 2" a PG-13 affair, putting commerce before...we don't want to say art, but integrity sure fits. In a media age where there are entire blocks of channels dedicated to 24/7 children's, tween and teen programming, surely there was space for another R-rated action film. Action films provide thrills for all ages, but explosions, violence, and teeth-shattering carnage are best appreciated by adults that have lived a little, that have been places, garnered accomplishments. Perhaps those who are over seventeen. Megan Ellison knows what we're talking about.

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  • The Playlist
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    Sundance Review: 'Keep The Lights On' A Moving & Engrossing Chronicle Of Two Men In Love

    With "Keep the Lights On," co-writer/director Ira Sachs has made a triumphant return to Sundance. His latest drama is a beautiful exploration of a relationship’s progression from start to finish. With great tact and depth of feeling, Sachs shows us that the most remarkable thing about any relationship is not the beginning or end but rather the maintenance of what could only unfairly be called a dysfunctional couple. Unlike Sachs’s Sundance Grand Jury Prize-winning "Forty Shades of Blue," which focuses on a singular moment in a marriage’s disintegration, "Keep the Lights On" follows a couple as they struggle to stay together.

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  • The Playlist
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    Sundance Review: Disappointing 'Robot And Frank' Is High Concept Sci-Fi That's Low On Ideas

    In recent years Sundance has been hit with a handful of smart science fiction films tackling large themes within an extremely limited scope. From the $7000 “Primer” to the $5 million “Moon,” their respective filmmakers managed to put forth some interesting ideas without being hindered creatively by their minimal budgets. Last year’s breakout “Another Earth” may have suffered a bit from its great premise being pushed perhaps too far into the background of an otherwise standard grief drama. But it’s always a compromise between the resources that are available and how much of the hardware must actually be shown onscreen to create a believable world set in an alternate present or distant future. Arriving at a decision on what to cut and what needs to be shown must be agony for those films hoping to achieve any kind of scope. But in the best cases, smart filmmakers can use these restrictions to their advantage helping the films get their ideas across in the leanest way possible. This year’s sci-fi Sundance entry is “Robot And Frank,” a high concept, low-key heist film set in the near future.

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  • Press Play
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    PAUL ROWLANDS: Will the real Steven Soderbergh please stand up?

    Whenever friends ask for my opinion on Steven Soderbergh, I reply, "Which Soderbergh?'" Are they referring to the man who directs super-stylish, cool, intelligent entertainments such as the "Ocean's" trilogy (2001 - 2007) and "Out of Sight" (1998), "Traffic" (2000) and "Erin Brockovich" (2000), or the man who directed such idiosyncratic experimental features as "Schizopolis" (1996), "Full Frontal" (2002) and "Bubble" (2005)? On the surface, his career choices seem among the most perverse and erratic of any modern filmmaker. There aren't any other contemporary directors who are able or willing to switch from one genre and style of filmmaking to another and exhibit such different sensibilities. It is entirely possible to love one side of the man's professional identity, the entertainer -- a side currently represented by his bruising action picture "Haywire" (2012) - whilst remaining ambivalent about his other, equally important and equally characteristic side, the experimenter.

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  • Press Play
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    OSCARS DEATH RACE: A BETTER LIFE

    I wanted to love a movie that, in the first five minutes, had a teenage girl march up to a schoolmate and get right in his face all, "Give my boyfriend his money back or I'm-a have you killed." Ruthie (Chelsea Rendon) has gangster uncles, and she doesn't give a shit.

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