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  • Shadow and Act
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    Brazil's Dezenove Announces Details on 2011-2012 Production Slate

    With the recent announcement of developments with its 2011-12 productions, Dezenove Som e Imagens has established itself as one of the fastest-rising production houses in Brazil.

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    More: FYI
  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Descendants, Clooney, Streep Top Gurus 'O Gold Oscar Rankings

    Descendants, Clooney, Streep Top Gurus 'O Gold Oscar Rankings

    The Gurus have spoken. Post-festivals, Alexander Payne's The Descendants (1) has taken over the frontrunner spot from Steven Spielberg's unscreened period war adventure War Horse (2). Interestingly, Spielberg was considering submitting the film to Venice but decided not to do so. He usually likes to wait until the last possible minute to show his films. It's better NOT to be at the head of the pack, anyway. The Descendants' George Clooney (1) is also at the front of the Best Actor race.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Watch Short Teaser For D.C. Sniper Thriller "Blue Caprice" (Isaiah Washington, Tequan Richmond)

    Here's a short teaser clip for Blue Caprice, which I found on director Alexandre Moors' website. The thriller, written by Ronald Porto and currently filming in NYC, stars Isaiah Washington in the role of the Washington D.C. sniper John Allen Muhammad, who took the lives of at least 10 people in a random killing spree in October of 2002.

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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    Let It Play: An Interview with "Weekend" director Andrew Haigh

    British filmmaker Andrew Haigh’s Weekend has become one of the indie breakouts of 2011. Why that’s especially noteworthy is that it happens to be a romance between two men—and one that doesn’t shy away from the ins and outs of gay sex. As evidenced in his debut film, Greek Pete (2009), Haigh isn’t timid about such graphic depictions—but he’s also more interested in mind and soul than body, constantly negotiating between them to create something transcendent. Read more from Michael Koresky on the film here, and, below, read Eric Hynes’s interview with Haigh, who worked for years as an editor in the film industry (Gladiator, Black Hawk Down, Hannibal Rising) before striking out to make his own personal cinema.

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  • The Playlist
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    Lars Von Trier Embraces His Persona Non Grata Status In Poster For 'Melancholia'

    Lars Von Trier seems to have taken to heart the old Groucho Marx adage of not belonging to any club that will have him as a member. The director who famously ruffled feathers this spring at Cannes with his terrible Nazi "joke" -- and who caused more consternation by not apologizing for it -- has decided to give himself a character poster for the U.K. release of "Melancholia." What's more, his is the only one stamped with an "official" Cannes Persona Non Grata stamp. You gotta love it.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Documentary on Congolese Street Musicians, "Benda Bilili!" Hits American Theaters This Week

    We initially covered Benda Bilili! back in February when it was chosen to screen at South by Southwest Film Festival. Since then, it has continued on through the festival circuit and this week, will receive a limited release in the U.S. and Canada.

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  • The Playlist
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    Lee Daniels Will Visit 'Valley Of The Dolls' For NBC

    In case you didn't get the memo, period programming is the new black. Thanks to the runaway success of "Mad Men," ailing network channels who have been losing viewers to better programming on their cable rivals have been falling over themselves to try and replicate the popularity of AMC's show. This past weekend, ABC bowed the very expensive looking, though somewhat middling "Pan Am," while NBC is already two episodes deep in their poorly received "The Playboy Club." Perhaps sensing they might need to get another show moving if 'Playboy' doesn't pick up, the network is looking to one of the most popular melodramas of all time to try and find a winner, and have now found a helmer who knows his way around a genre to help out.

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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    Simply the Worst: Cameron Crowe's "Vanilla Sky"

    A little more than a decade ago, Almost Famous cemented writer-producer-director Cameron Crowe’s status as the reigning king of feel-good movies. It earned near-unanimous critical praise, won Crowe an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay, and was named the best film of the year by no less than Roger Ebert. His previous efforts, 1996’s Jerry Maguire in particular, were similarly successful. Crowe had long been a critical darling, something a cursory glance at his Rotten Tomatoes page can quantify. And then something happened: he made Vanilla Sky. Many who championed Crowe’s earlier, more lighthearted work seem quite frankly to have viewed his foray into sci-fi as not only a far cry from his unbridled optimism of yore but also, as Salon’s Stephanie Zacharek wrote, a “a betrayal of everything that Crowe has proved he knows how to do right,” and the formerly beloved filmmaker was quickly reevaluated. His next film, 2005’s Elizabethtown, was no less reviled than its predecessor but also something of a return to form: romance sans psychodrama. Crowe’s other films betray a certain boyishness and nostalgia, as well as the sense that good things happen to good people and everything tends to turn out okay in the end. But Vanilla Sky is more concerned with remorse, unfulfilled desire, and death. Quite a thematic jump, and one which many deemed a failure. Read Michael Nordine's entry in Reverse Shot's "Simply the Worst" symposium.

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    More: new issue
  • ReelPolitik
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    Is Netflix Killing Off Micro-Indie Film?

    Is Netflix Killing Off Micro-Indie Film?

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  • The Playlist
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    Review: 'Real Steel' A Simple, Effective Crowd Pleaser Like A Robot-Driven 'Warrior' For Kids

    If the maturity and sophistication of “Warrior” is more than you can handle, then “Real Steel” might be the movie for you. A start-to-finish festival of storytelling conventions, director Shawn Levy’s bid for credibility differs only from its predecessor in that it’s aimed at a kid-friendly audience, making its relentless obedience to formula perhaps more acceptable, but less augmented by genuinely great performances. Nevertheless a crowd-pleaser of the first order – even on par with the ‘80s films from folks like Spielberg and Zemeckis that inspire it – “Real Steel” is an effective retelling of a familiar story, albeit one that it might help being ten years old (or having the same mindset) to fully enjoy.

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