Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
Celebrating 17 Years of Film.Biz.Fans.

the Blogs

recent Posts

  • Shadow and Act
    0 comments

    Nicole Ari Parker Is Blanche Du Bois To Blair Underwood's "Stanley Kowalski" In "Streetcar"

    Blair Underwood has found his Blanche Du Bois. Nicole Ari Parker will make her Broadway debut as Blanche Du Bois, opposite Underwood (also making his Broadway debut) playing Stanley Kowalski, in the Emily Mann-directed production of A Streetcar Named Desire, scheduled to debut in spring 2012.

    Read More »
  • Thompson on Hollywood
    0 comments

    Academy Announces Technology Interns

    The Academy announced today that its Science and Technology Council had selected as its 2011 interns five students who will have the opportunity to participate in 10-12 week internships providing the opportunity to experience advanced movie-making technology.

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    0 comments

    Review: Shion Sono An Exciting New Discovery; 'Cold Fish' Bleak, Bloody, Bold

    The following is a reprint from of our review from VIFF last year.

    Read More »
    More: Review
  • Thompson on Hollywood
    0 comments

    Review: Rookie Neal Dhand's Hardboiled Crime Drama Second-Story Man

    At least as filmmakers have imagined it, this country’s northernmost climes lay somewhere in the hinterlands between city and farmland, an exurban wilderness of barred windows and black snow. These are towns you pass through on a road trip without slowing down, because you wouldn’t want to stay the night. In fact, these are towns where you’re apt to be robbed at gunpoint by a girl hidden in heavy coats, sidling up to empty your wallet and then running back to the car —a salt-flecked Impala the same gray as the surrounds, as though it were trying to disappear. This is land pioneered by Sam Raimi in A Simple Plan and the Coen brothers in Fargo, an icy frontier so devoid of activity it drives otherwise reasonable people to commit unthinkable crimes.

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    0 comments

    The Playlist Informs On You: 16 Notable Whistleblower Movies

    The idea of the insider who, despite pressure from authorities, employers, families and friends, decides to do the right thing and blow the whole operation sky high, has been the source of some pretty terrific drama for getting on half a century now. The latest addition to the canon is "The Whistleblower," which sees Rachel Weisz as a U.N. operative who risks everything to expose a sex trafficking scandal among her colleagues.

    Read More »
  • Spout
    0 comments

    "The Change-Up" Needs to Be Remade by Katie Aselton Immediately

    Who knew that combining the tropes of the body swap movie and the conventions of the raunchy brom-com were what we needed as the final word in male-based comedy this year? I'm not so sure David Dobkin's "The Change-Up" fulfills that conclusion, but it at least displays the potential for its mashed up concept. And, thankfully, it's one of the least offensive. But even if it did display as much outright homophobic (as opposed to homoerotic) and misogynistic (as opposed to customarily sexist) ideas as plenty other films do this year, I might excuse it for an appropriateness of ventriloquism. Screenwriters Jon Lucas and Scott Moore (both of "The Hangover") could seem to have free will in saying terrible things through their characters' mouths, as if they were magically transferred into their bodies and speaking through disguise.

    Read More »
    More: Remakes
  • Thompson on Hollywood
    0 comments

    Oscar Watch: How Weta Gives Rise to the Planet of the Apes; Andy Serkis as Lon Chaney

    One of the debates on Twitter Friday morning was which movie will be the one to the beat for this year's VFX Oscar? Michael Bay's 3-D Transformers: Dark of the Moon, which set out to challenge James Cameron's 3-D Avatar, or Terrence Malick's spacey The Tree of Life? Now a new summer movie has entered the Oscar fray: Rise of the Planet of the Apes. Bill Desowitz reports:Hail Caesar!

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    0 comments

    Review: '30 Minutes Or Less' Is A Fun But Forgettable Conclusion To The Summer Of R-Rated Excess

    Zipping along at a brisk pace -- albeit one that feels like it's rushing to be over -- featuring dueling bromance buddy tales from both protagonists and villains, and mostly amusing in its vulgar humor and gags, the "action"-comedy "30 Minutes Or Less," is entertaining, but ultimately only a mild effort in the mediocre R-Rated comedy sweepstakes that have dominated this season.

    Read More »
  • The Lost Boys
    0 comments

    Try Not To Cry

    I finally found this online. It's the deputation of heroic 14 year old Anika Tabovaradan, who was one of the hundreds of folks to stand up to the insanity of Rob Ford's social service cuts. As sad as it is to watch Ford seem emotion-free as a result (he's like some sort of sociopathic super villain swivelling in that chair), Tabovaradan reminds all of us Torontonians just what's at stake with the ridiculous bullshit going down at City Hall:

    Read More »
  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
    0 comments

    Tell Me a Story: Raul Ruiz's "Mysteries of Lisbon"

    Thanks to his towering 1999 adaptation Time Regained (a film that seems more and more like a mirage the further away we get from it), the Chilean-born Raúl Ruiz is one of the few filmmakers whose work truly earns the term Proustian. He has the perfect artistic temperament for the kind of epically layered filmmaking necessitated by his latest project: a film version of Camilo Castelo Branco’s 1852 novel The Mysteries of Lisbon, a beloved Borgesian classic of Portuguese literature little known to English-language readers. His tendency toward the baroque is tempered by a literate approach to character and a stately aesthetic. This is not the sort of film that one would normally call “fun,” but the 69-year-old Ruiz, who has stated that the film might be his last, seems to be having a ball. From the first strings of the swoony, old-fashioned score by veteran composer Jorge Arriagada over the opening credits, it’s clear that Ruiz wishes to envelop the viewer in lush, traditional storytelling; this being wily Ruiz, though, The Mysteries of Lisbon foregrounds that storytelling to a nearly absurd degree. Read Michael Koresky's review of The Mysteries of Lisbon.

    Read More »