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  • The Playlist
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    Listen: 'Drive' Soundtrack Star/Producer Johnny Jewel Delivers 2 1/2 Hour Film Score 'Symmetry'

    If you had told us at the beginning of the year that the soundtrack to Nicolas Winding Refn's low-budget arthouse noir "Drive" would become a smash hit, we would have said you were crazy. But nothing about that film could be called predictable, and when Refn splased up the neon title card with "Nightcall" playing underneath it, all bets were off. But if you loved the tunes on the soundtrack, Santa is filling your stocknig with a lot more as producer Johnny Jewel -- the man behind Glass Candy and spin off bands Chromatics ("Tick Of The Clock") and Desire ("Under Your Spell") -- has delivered Symmetry: Themes For An Imaginary Film.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Round 2 Of The Shadow & Act Digital Filmmaker Showcase Starts Today! Watch & Vote Now!

    After a six-month layoff, the Shadow and Act Digital Filmmaker Showcase is back with Round 2.

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  • The Lost Boys
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    What Does a Gay Horse Eat? A 'Haaaay' Reading of Steven Spielberg's 'War Horse'

    So last night - in an attempt to catch up on the ridiculous amount of December releases this year so I could make an honest top 10 list (which I should have up here by early next week) - I finally saw Steven Spielberg's 'War Horse.' In many ways it was exactly what I expected: beautifully shot, horribly written (I laughed out loud a good dozen times at some of the dialogue), unabashedly sentimental and artistically old school in a lazy kind of way... But there was one thing I was definitely not expecting. For 'War Horse' to be so downright campy, and - on multiple occasions - most definitely warrant a gay reading.

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  • The Playlist
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    Wim Wenders Working On A 3D Film About Architecture

    While James Cameron can be credited with bringing 3D back to the multiplex in a big way, leave it to guys like Martin Scorsese and Wim Wenders to truly push the boundaries of the format in 2011, proving that it can do more than just make expensive, special effects blockbusters look good. For Scorsese, "Hugo" was arguably far more immersive than anything in "Avatar," with every inch of each frame a wonder to look at. Meanwhile, Wenders used 3D as a dimension to capture the energy and power of dance in a way that has never been done before, and the director is heading back to the format for a brand new project that also promises to offer more than meets than eye.

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  • Press Play
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    VIDEO ESSAY: MAGIC AND LIGHT: THE FILMS OF STEVEN SPIELBERG, Chapter 5: Father Figures

    Steven Spielberg is the product of The Greatest Generation -- a Baby Boomer raised on idealized images of the nuclear family, progress, and American might. He is also a child of divorce -- a dreamer from a broken home. Spielberg’s attempt to reconcile these two biographical facts—the mythic ideal of the family, and the reality of its dismantling—has been at the heart of many of his films. Spielberg’s movies often focus on a real or makeshift family unit, banding together to fight an outside force that threatens to tear it apart. At the head of this makeshift family, there is often a father figure imparting wisdom to his charges, or being forced to confront his shortcomings as a protector. Often both.

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  • Leonard Maltin
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    War Horse—movie review

    I don’t like pigeonholing films, and I’ve never been fond of the term “chick flick,” but I’d be less than candid if I didn’t tell you that several women I know and respect (including my wife) were moved to tears by 'War Horse', while I was lukewarm about it. Normally, I’m a sucker for this kind of picture, which has a great deal of sentiment built into it—but I found its execution too blatant and—if I’m not making a pun—on-the-nose.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Video: Max von Sydow Talks the Silence of The Renter

    I first encountered Max von Sydow on the big screen playing chess with Death in Ingmar Bergman's "The Seventh Seal" at The New Yorker in Manhattan when I was a teenager. He's surprised that I've seen it. "You watched black and white films?" he asks, admitting that this is his first flipcam interview.

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  • Leonard Maltin
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    We Bought A Zoo—movie review

    If your favorite descriptive word for a movie is “edgy,” you might want to skip this one. If, however, you like heartwarming—not cloying—stories about decent people, and hope to leave the theater feeling better than you did when you walked in, 'We Bought a Zoo' will be a welcome cup of holiday cheer. Rated PG, it is intended to please a family audience, so the timing is perfect.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Academy Names 97 Original Scores for Oscar Contention; Newman Lands Four Eligible Scores to Desplat's Three

    Ninety-seven original scores are eligible to compete for the Oscar. Now the music branch will vote for the films that will make the top five to be announced nominations morning on January 24. The Academy deems eligible scores that are substantially original. Thomas Newman edged out Alexandre Desplat with four eligible films to three, while as expected, John Williams has two films, Spielberg's "War Horse" and "The Adventures of Tintin." Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross are likely to to earn a nomination for David Fincher's "Girl with the Dragon Tattoo." 

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  • Shadow and Act
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    "Fresh Prince Of Bel Air" Cast Reunite For The Holidays Fueling More Talk About Potential Onscreen Reunion

    This is one of those things that make you go hmmm...

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