Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
Celebrating 17 Years of Film.Biz.Fans.

the Blogs

recent Posts

  • The Playlist
    0 comments

    SXSW '12: Richard Linklater & Matthew McConaughey Talk Revisiting Wooderson In Prospective 'Dazed And Confused' Sorta-Sequel

    "Dazed and Confused"

    Despite his status as something of an indie auteur, Richard Linklater is reassuringly populist in his thinking about movies, particularly when it comes to sequels. In 2004 he produced a sequel to “Before Sunrise” entitled “Before Sunset,” and after “School of Rock” became a runaway success, he and star Jack Black have spent years trying to mount a follow-up. But when it comes to his much-beloved “Dazed and Confused,” Linklater hasn’t explored that possibility as actively, although in interviews not long ago he mentioned the possibility of a second installment – well, sort of.

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    0 comments

    'The Cat In The Hat' Will Get Animated Courtesy Of The Team Behind 'The Lorax'

    "The Lorax": $132m domestic gross (to date). "Horton Hears a Who!": $297m worldwide gross. "How the Grinch Stole Christmas": $345m worldwide gross. Dr Seuss adaptations are a cinematic brand that audiences respond to. Or to put it another way: When Hollywood studios adapt Dr. Seuss books, it's pretty much certain they'll make them big bucks. Even the dreadful live-action "The Cat in the Hat" starring Mike Myers earned more than $100m domestic, so don't be surprised to hear about a "Green Eggs and Ham" movie in the works, sooner rather than later.

    Read More »
  • ReelPolitik
    0 comments

    Is "The Hunger Games" Anti-Capitalist Cinema for the 99%? Or Anti-Gov't Agit-Prop?

    While I'm loathe to promote a pop cultural event such as "The Hunger Games," it'll be interesting to see where the culture wars take positions on the new teen fantasy franchise, which according to early reviews, is going to be seen by lots and lots and lots of people. I'm not familiar with the books, and my only interest in the film is its politics, not its entertainment value, but the very premise suggests an attack on much of what our infantile culture worships: reality TV, celebrity, fame and material wealth. And sure, this baby is all about making money for studio Lionsgate and the other investors in the film, but I do believe it is possible--though rare--for a corporate film to have its capitalistic cake and choke on it, too. See "V For Vendetta" or "FIght Club."

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    0 comments

    Review: 'Delicacy' Delves Into A Memory That Can't Be Forgotten With A Face That Everyone Loves

    At the start of "Delicacy", we meet two lovers, Nathalie (Audrey Tatou) and Francois (Pio Marmai). They are at play, re-creating the memories of their first encounter at a smoky French restaurant, where he gambled as to what she would order, making his move when she proved his thoughts correct. It's the image Francois already had of his future paramour, and, "Delicacy" argues, the one that mattered the greatest. What is love if not a permanent feeling for a temporary state?

    Read More »
  • Shadow and Act
    0 comments

    African Cinema Is In Spotlight As New York African Film Festival Returns April 11 to 17

    I remember salivating over last year's eclectic lineup, and I'm certainly looking forward to this year's offerings which include several titles we've covered here on S&A like Andy Okoroafor's Relentless (photo above of the director and star Nneka) and South African noir How To Steal 2 Million.

    Read More »
  • Shadow and Act
    0 comments

    Video: Reel Soul on "Blaxploitation"

    “We must rid ourselves of the habit, now that we are in the thick of the fight, of minimizing the actions of our fathers or of feigning incomprehension when considering their silence and passivity.  They fought as well as they could, with the arms they possessed then.”

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    0 comments

    Review: 'The FP' A Fun, Ambitious, Over-The-Top Comedy That Isn't Much More Than A Novelty

    A film that feels cobbled together from a "Dance Dance Revolution" arcade machine, that graffiti-covered white room where Will Smith shot music videos during his 'Fresh Prince' days and the desperate need to create a new pop culture catchphrase, “The FP” is a singular pastiche of hip-hop nostalgia, smalltown escapism and dystopian absurdity. But the raw materials from which brothers Brandon and Jason Trost assemble their first feature are so specific that the end result may have trouble appealing to a wider audience, especially if viewers aren’t willing to embed their tongue so deeply in their cheek that they practically choke on it. A fun and ambitious if over-the-top and overlong comedy about a world where gangs work out their differences via dance fights to the death, “The FP” is one of the most unique films made in years, but that novelty value also often makes it more of an admirable effort than a truly enjoyable one.

    Read More »
    More: The FP, Review
  • Press Play
    0 comments

    The Art of the March Madness Telecast

    Every year narratives play out in NCAA tournament games that are as dramatic and sensational as those in the soap operas that they preempt, and the storytelling strategies used in the broadcasts themselves can be downright fascinating. This game is a perfect example of what I mean: the last few minutes of regulation unfold as if they’re part of a self-contained short film about heartache, redemption, and truth in photography.

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    0 comments

    Review: 'The Hunger Games' Is Thoughtful, Thrilling Popular Entertainment That Genuinely Deserves To Be A Franchise

    Complexity and understatement are two criminally under-utilized values in most mainstream movies these days, but they’re at the core of, and the chief reason for the success of “The Hunger Games.” Director Gary Ross, screenwriter of the proletariat presidential fantasy “Dave” and writer-director of the social-consciousness-as-sci-fi tome “Pleasantville,” has always engaged his subjects with a light and yet substantial touch, but his adaptation of Suzanne Collins’ acclaimed young-adult novel is a truly remarkable achievement: he turns escapism into a deeply emotional experience. Instantly razing comparisons – qualitative especially -- to other female-friendly series such as “Twilight,” “The Hunger Games” is the first film in a long time that deserves Hollywood’s instant-franchise ambitions because it appeals to genre fans regardless of gender by crafting a story that’s both epic and intimate, spectacular and subtle.

    Read More »
  • Criticwire
    0 comments

    SXSW So Far: Criticwire Highlights from Austin

    See how some of the biggest films at SXSW fared with critics.

    Read More »