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  • The Playlist
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    TIFF Review: 'Berberian Sound Studio' Is An Unnerving, Original Psychological Horror Anchored By The Great Toby Jones

    People love movies about the making of movies. Well, that's perhaps an exaggeration -- general audiences have a history of some apathy towards the genre. But filmmakers certainly love films that go behind the scenes of their own business, from "8 1/2" to last year's Oscar winner "The Artist," and cinephiles tend to eat them up as well. But most examples of the type tend to focus on the making of the movie, with a handful, like "Adaptation," following the gestation and writing of a film, but very few have ever focused on the point at which many filmmakers say their movies actually come together: post-production.

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  • Leonard Maltin
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    My Big Fat Reference Book

    Yes, Virginia, some people still consult reference books, and some people still edit them, like me. At 1640 pages, 'Leonard Maltin’s 2013 Movie Guide' is the latest edition of a paperback I’ve been overseeing since I was a teenager.

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  • The Playlist
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    New Clip From 'The Master'; Joaquin Phoenix Says Making 'I'm Still Here' Damaged His Career

    Don't call it a comeback, he's been here for years. Joaquin Phoenix has been appearing on screen for nearly three decades, initially under the name Leaf, but really came to attention in 1995 in Gus Van Sant's "To Die For," a film that really put him on the map. And across the next decade and a bit, in everything from blockbusters "Gladiator" and "Signs" to his hugely impressive collaborations with James Gray on "The Yards," "We Own The Night" and "Two Lovers," Phoenix steadily revealed himself as one of the most talented and committed actors of his generation.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    TIFF Review - Shola Lynch's Sobering, Candid 'Free Angela & All Political Prisoners'

    Question: You had a pretty bourgeois and comfortable childhood, in Birmingham; and so did your sister [Angela]; can you trace the development of someone from that kind of background into a revolutionary and Marxist person?

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  • The Playlist
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    TIFF Review: Robert Redford's 'The Company You Keep' Is An Unconvincing Bit Of Agitprop

    The third film in Robert Redford’s recent series of stillborn, bleeding heart dramas, "The Company You Keep" is a busy but inert civic-minded thriller. As a director, Redford has yet to break his recent habit of using hackneyed dialogue to talk down to his audience with Aaron Sorkin-esque dialogue that authoritatively spells out his talking points. But unlike "Lions for Lambs," an impressively incensed civics lesson that thinks it’s a drama, "The Company You Keep" is too cool of a film to be admired for its creator’s chutzpah alone. In fact, it’s probably the most frustrating of Redford’s recent films because it has a pseudo-contemplative atmosphere to it, one that superficially begs viewers to reflect upon how far they would go for their convictions. Political apathy is the real enemy in "The Company You Keep," making it pitiably ironic that Redford’s latest is as unmoving as it is.

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  • The Playlist
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    TIFF Review: 'Thanks For Sharing' The Uneven Dramedy Version Of 'Shame'

    It's safe to say that sex addiction is no longer the misunderstood step-brother to alcohol and drug addiction. Thanks to reality television, cable shows like "Californication" and last year's awards season contender "Shame," the stigma around sex addiction, of it not really being a problem or something that only affects scuzzy perverts, has long since evaported. Which makes Stuart Blumberg's directorial debut "Thanks For Sharing" all the more curious. An uneven, somewhat out-of-time dramedy, the film takes great pains to confirm that sex addiction is just like any other addiction, but isn't sure what to say beyond that.

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  • The Playlist
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    The Wachowskis Finally Give Up Their Anonymity & Lana Addresses Her Sexual Transformation: 'Cloud Atlas' At TIFF

    “Cloud Atlas,” the sprawling and epic adaptation of David Mitchell’s celebrated, heady and dense novel, screened last night at the Toronto International Film Festival. An unorthodox arrangement, as it was directed by the Wachowski siblings, Larry and Lana, plus German filmmaker Tom Tykwer (“Run Lola Run”), at a cost of over $100 million, “Cloud Atlas” is the most expensive independent film ever made (i.e. outside of the studio system and from a triage of financiers).

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    TIFF DEAL WRAP: Focus Lands 'Place Beyond the Pines,' Strand Enters 'Paradise'

    Focus Features has landed U.S. rights to one of TIFF's hot acquisition titles which played well at its world premiere: the hardboiled drama "The Place Beyond the Pines," which is dominated first by Ryan Gosling and then Bradley Cooper. It's writer-director Derek Cianfrance's follow-up to "Blue Valentine," which also starred Gosling (and Oscar-nominated Michelle Williams), and was also produced by Lynette Howell and Jamie Patricoff's Electric City Entertainment and Alex Orlovsky's Verisimilitude.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Arthouse Audit: Sundance Fest Hits Theaters

    Although the film festival action is in Toronto right now, there's a mini-Sundance going on this weekend. Six different films that premiered at this year's event, including four in the prime American Narrative and Documentary competition, opened to varying but mainly decent results. "The Words," one of the six, opened wide this week and ranked #3 in the top 10.

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  • The Playlist
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    Focus Features Go To 'The Place Beyond The Pines,' 'Great Expectations' And 'Jayne Mansfield's Car' Also Find Homes

    Several days into this year's Toronto International Film Festival, the buyers' market hasn't quite caught fire yet. A few films have been picked up, mostly on the smaller scale of things, but the first few days have mostly been made up of films that already have distribution – the "Cloud Atlas"es, "Silver Linings Playbook"s and "Anna Karenina"s of the world. But in the next few days, the real hot tickets start to unspool, and the first major acquisition of the festival has been made.

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