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  • The Playlist
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    'Elite Squad' Director Jose Padilha Taking On Kathryn Bigelow With Actioner 'Tri-Border'

    "The Hurt Locker" Oscar-winner Kathryn Bigelow might have a big head start over the competition with her Osama Bin Laden project, which just got picked up by Sony, but switching over to that film means that another of her projects has some competition that might well pip it to the post. Bigelow was originally meant to follow up her awards success by reteaming with writer Mark Boal (who's also writing the Bin Laden project) on "Triple Frontier," an action-drama starring Tom Hanks (and potentially Johnny Depp as well), a "Traffic"-style multi-stranded tale focusing on the border between Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay, a crime-ridden area rife with drug traffickers.

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  • The Playlist
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    Let Us Get Our Tiny Violin: Vin Diesel Upset He's Being Paid Scale For 'Riddick' Sequel No One Wants

    Film To Be R-Rated, Shoot This Summer1999's "Pitch Black" was a nifty little sci-fi horror film: nothing special, but a solid genre entry, which used a decent cast, including Cole Hauser and Radha Mitchell, and in particular granite-voiced man mountain Vin Diesel, to good effect. The film made Diesel a star, and off the back of the success of "The Fast & The Furious," Universal took a gamble that the actor's breakout character in David Twohy's film, brutal convict Riddick, could be the star of his very own franchise, with 2004's "The Chronicles of Riddick."

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  • Caryn James
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    The Hangover II: Maybe What Happened in Bangkok Should Have Stayed In Bangkok?

    Bangkok – bigger, sexier, sleazier than Vegas! That’s the transparent thinking behind The Hangover Part II. If you’ve been anywhere near a TV or seen a movie trailer lately, you know that this sequel brings Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms and Zach Galifianakis to Thailand for another wedding, letting them run amok in a city offering more muck than most.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Join Us Now! S&A Livecast Season 2, Episode 7

    It's that time again people! Tonight the S&A Crew will discuss some hot issues taking place in the world of black cinema. Please join us at 8pm/est. Slated topics: "The Crisis of the Black Leading Man" post Sergio's post on "What Defines A Black Actor" Black Actresses. Is there a color barrier? If so, is it the responsibility of "top tier" actresses to bring the matter to light?

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    More: Podcast
  • The Playlist
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    Did You Know? Quentin Tarantino Asked Kurt Cobain To Play Eric Stoltz’s Part In 'Pulp-Fiction'

    The year was 1993. It was September and the school year had just started. Unless you were a pre-teener, chances are you were finishing high school or starting college (if you were friends with us). You were disenfranchised, angry, frustrated; the culture of complaint sweeping the zeitgeist was hitting your sweet spot and you were pissed.

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  • Peter Bogdanovich
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    The Greatest Year?

    Back in the early 1970s, I had a monthly column in Esquire called “Hollywood”, and one piece I did concerned the low state of movie quality at the time (things have only gotten worse), especially in light of the glorious past. To make my point, I arbitrarily picked 1939, the year I was born---along with a number of my illustrious colleagues (like Coppola and Friedkin)---and ran through the amazingly prolific array of movie classics released in that last year of the 1930s, including such seeming evergreens as Gone With the Wind and The Wizard of Oz. A few months later, in a huge spread in Life magazine, Richard Schickel wrote a similar lengthy rundown of pictures from 1939, but he declared it unequivocally The Greatest Year of American Movies. This worked its way into the culture and is now the establishment viewpoint. I often wonder what would have happened if I’d been born in 1941.Certainly a case can be made that 1941 is actually a greater year for American film than 1939, since John Ford’s How Green Was My Valley (the Oscar winner for Best Picture) and Orson Welles’ Citizen Kane are certainly greater, more personal works of art than either Gone With the Wind or The Wizard of Oz. And clearly one could return more frequently to Preston Sturges’ 1941 masterpiece, The Lady Eve. Though Howard Hawks had his archetypal Only Angels Have Wings in 1939, he had in 1941 both Sergeant York and Ball of Fire (both with Gary Cooper, who won Best Actor for York). And Raoul Walsh had his tragic gangster milestone, High Sierra, which made Humphrey Bogart an A-list star and made it possible for John Huston to cast him in the lead for his first directorial effort, The Maltese Falcon, also a 1941 release. Anyway, all this is by way of introducing the Esquire column that seems to have started it all, which author-critic Clive James has uploaded on his website, and to which we herewith supply a link. The substantial question of which year is The Greatest will be more deeply discussed when we get around to the 1940s in our Golden Age of American Talkies series of blogs. In a nutshell, however, I would simplify matters by stating that the absolute highpoint in the American Cinema was reached with the years 1939-1940-1941, since 1940 boasted, among others, such treasures as Ford’s Depression family epic, The Grapes of Wrath, Hawks’ breakneck screwball newspaper romance, His Girl Friday, and Ernst Lubitsch’s most beautiful human comedy, The Shop Around the Corner

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  • The Playlist
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    9 New Actors Join Tarsem's 'Snow White' Film Including Michael Lerner & Mare Winningham

    So Universal and Relativity are playing a game of chicken with the release dates on their dueling "Snow White" projects, right? Wanna know how Relativity is serious about their just announced March 16, 2012 release date which gives them all of ten months to shoot, edit and prepare the film for release?

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Antoine Fuqua On New Short List Of Directors Up For "Wolverine" Gig

    So... with Darren Aronofsky excusing himself from helming the next Wolverine movie some months ago, who might 20th Century Fox be looking at to replace him?

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    More: FYI
  • Shadow and Act
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    Watch - Oprah Says Doesn't Say "Goodbye" But "Until We Meet Again"

    If you missed it today... No comment necessary...

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    More: Television
  • Shadow and Act
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    The Horror Movie "Brotha Rule" Applies In Trailer For "Shark Night 3D"

    So it's pretty much just Piranha 3D, except with sharks? And I hope I don't have to explain what the "brotha rule" in horror movies is. Shark Night 3D bows in theaters in September.

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    More: Trailer