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  • Leonard Maltin
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  • The Playlist
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    Tribeca Reviews: 'Black Butterflies' & 'The Assault'

    “Black Butterflies”Ingrid Jonker (Carice Van Houten) lived an impossible contradiction, writing heart-rending poetry about being a woman of privilege living under apartheid rule, all the while dealing with pressure from the head of the censorship board (Rutger Hauer), a man who also happened to be her father. “Black Butterflies” is the story of how Jonker, a woman with unending sexual cravings and a noted mental imbalance, managed to cope with this dichotomy.

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  • Spout
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    Spout About: "Captain America 2" and Fish-Out-of-Water Heroes; How We All Live in "The Truman Show"

    I don't usually pay much attention to stuff like this, but circulation of an MTV interview with Chris Evans on the plot of "Captain America 2" makes me feel like a stranger in a strange land. One where people aren't aware that a large percentage of movies, particularly those based upon the myth of the hero, are fish-out-of-water stories. But the big news here is apparently that the sequel to "Captain America: The First Avenger" will involve the superhero traveling through time into the present, where he will deal with being out of place. Sounds like "Just Visiting" and a thousand other films. Hopefully he won't mistake cars for dragons, wander a shopping mall in great wonderment or drop his shield and have to use an iPad in its place. By the way, how is there no montage anywhere online that pieces together memorable fish-out-of-water movie moments such as Madison eating lobster in "Splash," Mick curiously studying the bidet in "Crocodile Dundee" and E.T. raiding the fridge (and getting drunk) in "E.T.," among countless others.

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  • Women and Hollywood
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    The Arbor - Directed by Clio Barnard

    Clio Barnard takes the documentary form and stands it on its head with The Arbor a look at playwright Andrea Dunbar and her family. Dunbar grew up a working class kid on an estate in Bradford, England. She was able to take her experiences of her life write a play while in her teens which was produced at the Royal Court Theatre in London. She had incredible, raw talent yet she struggled with drugs and alcohol, had terrible relationships with men and sadly died of a brain aneurysm before 30. It's sad to think what she might have written had she lived.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Venice Film Fest 2011: Aronofsky to Head Competition Jury

    Darren Aronofsky considers the Venice Film festival to be his good-luck charm. He debuted in Venice both The Wrestler, which won the Golden Lion in 2008, and Black Swan, which opened the festival last year. Both went on to become top awards contenders; Natalie Portman won the best actress Oscar. His first film to compete in Venice was The Fountain in 2006.

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  • The Playlist
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    Tribeca Review: 'Puncture' With Chris Evans A True Story Weighed Down By Oscar Reel Antics

    “Puncture”In 1998, Jeffrey Dancourt created the one-stick syringe, which helped saved the lives of several medical professionals while keeping costs down for supplies in the medical industry. The problem was that the industry, already the beneficiary of multimillion dollar agreements with supplies companies, refused the device. “Puncture” deals with the man’s engagements with two working class lawyers, the only ones willing to take on an un-winnable case against millionaire lawyers and their enormously powerful representatives.

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  • The Playlist
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    Lizzy Caplan Says A 'Party Down' Movie Is More Likely Than An 'Arrested Development' Movie

    Exclusive: Oh, "Party Down." Yet another brilliant comedy that shone for a brief moment before getting canceled; ever since going off the air the witty, hilarious sitcom has slowly gained a new audience who are now just catching up with it on DVD. Created and written by John Enbom, Rob Thomas, Dan Etheridge and Paul Rudd, "Party Down" featured an amazing ensemble cast of Adam Scott, Ken Marino, Jane Lynch, Jennifer Coolidge, Megan Mullally, Ryan Hansen, Martin Starr and Lizzy Caplan, and chronicled the travails of an L.A. based catering company made up of actors and writers hoping to make it big, including one who already had a brief taste of the spotlight. The clever concept found the characters catering a different party each episode while the scripts slowly developed the arcs over the course of a season. It was definitely one of the best written shows on television at the time but alas, the ratings were poor and eventually the folks over at Starz gave it the axe.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Trailer Watch: Immortals Features Shiny Things Like Muscles, Women, Weapons and CGI

    The new HD trailer for Tarsem Singh's Immortals showcases muscles, weapons and prop-babes. The film stars new Superman Henry Cavill, Luke Evans, Mickey Rourke, Freida Pinto, Isabel Lucas, John Hurt, Kellan Lutz, Stephen Dorff and Joseph Morgan. It hits theaters in 3-D November 11.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Ving Rhames Will Lead David Gordon's Comedy Pilot "Black Jack"

    All you Ving Rhames fans have something good coming your way. He's set to play the lead character in a comedy pilot for Comedy Central network titled Black Jack. The project will be executive produced by David Gordon Green, director of Pineapple Express and George Washington among others.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    SFIFF 54 Day Five: Time Travel, from Cave of Forgotten Dreams to Children of the Princess of Cleves

    Meredith Brody reports on the latest festival screenings from San Francisco:The Frenchwoman who introduced Children of the Princess of Cleves gave us an invaluable bit of information that cast the film in an interesting light. President Nicolas Sarkozy said that reading the required “Princess of Cleves,” published in 1678, made no sense for a high school student who would be working as a cashier in two years. Many in France were incensed by the comment, big surprise -- as am I – wasn’t Sarkozy, despite a wealthy background, posited as “l’homme du people” when he ran for President? Here’s real-time news: when I Google Sarkozy, the news pops up that he and Carla Bruni are expecting their first child together – posted 13 minutes ago! I also learn that Sarkozy was a mediocre student, and had to go to a crammer to pass his baccalaureate, the exam that determines whether or not you can go on to college.

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