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  • SydneysBuzz
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  • Spout
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    "Megamind" is "The Social Network" for Kids

    In spite of my worry that the celebrity voice talent would be too distracting, I decided to watch "Megamind" anyway. It's fine. Not on the level of "The Incredibles," of course, and there was something about the "camera" angles and movement that was far more obnoxious and overwhelming than Will Ferrell's vocals, but I enjoyed my time with the simple villain-turned-good storyline. It certainly wasn't as frustrating as when invested comic book villains soften, a la characters like Venom and Deadpool turning out to at least wind up in the borderline "anti-hero" classification. Plus, halfway through the movie I developed one of my harebrained ideas upon realizing that "Megamind" deals with many of the same themes "The Social Network" does.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    David Thomson's Stump-the-Film-Buff 50 Movie Questions Quiz

    San Francisco-based critic David Thomson, the brainy Brit behind the must-own Biographical Dictionary of Film, has not only updated a spanking new fifth edition, but has devised a nifty quiz derived from info contained in the book. "In my estimate it's challenging," he writes in an email. "but I think plenty of film buffs will have fun."

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  • The Playlist
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    Disney Prepping 'Winnie The Pooh' For 2D, Hand-Animated Film For 2011

    Jim Cummings To Voice Winnie The Pooh, John Cleese To NarrateDisney, once the prestigious leaders of animated family fare, have struggled considerably in recent years to remain creative and relevant in a climate dominated by the likes of Pixar and DreamWorks Animation. Their most recent in-house efforts, "Meet the Robinsons," "Bolt" and "The Princess and the Frog" have been middling efforts and their upcoming "Tangled" has virtually no heat behind it (maybe we're just the wrong demographic but the buzz on that one seems non-existent at this point). So it's no surprise then that Disney is trotting out a successful, cherished brand to try and right the ship.

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  • Leonard Maltin
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    book reviews: New And Notable Film Books

    Once again, the continuing parade of film books has outpaced my ability to read and properly review them, so it’s time for a survey of recent titles. These are summaries based on skimming and not meant to be full-fledged critiques. I’m also motivated by helping to promote worthwhile books from smaller publishers that might not be on everyone’s radar, but deserve to be…all the more so as the holidays approach and people are thinking about gift ideas. I have a feeling this will be the first of at least two installments this season.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Legacy Watch: Dragon Tattoo vs. Dragon Tattoo, John Cazale's Five Perfect Career Choices

    - Sweden's The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo director Niels Arden Oplev protests against David Fincher's remake and another actress playing the Lisbeth Salander role--"highly unfair because Noomi [Rapace] has captured this part and it should always be all her," he told Random House's Word & Film site. He goes on to compare the below-par American remake of Luc Besson's La Femme Nikita to Fincher's remake (Heat Vision attacks this argument). But Besson wrote and directed the original La Femme Nikita - it was his. Oplev was directing a screenplay adaptation of Stieg Larsson's book. If Columbia and Fincher have rights to the same story, it's fair game. Not to mention the countless Americans who have the original book on their nightstands, many of whom are yet to see the Swedish trilogy on screen. They're waiting for most worthwhile and accessible version, and that could well be Fincher's. Here's The Playlist's take on the Oplev's comments: the original Dragon Tattoo film was fairly shite anyway.

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  • Spout
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    Robert De Niro and Edward Norton Star in One of the Best Sci-Fi Movies of 2010?

    "It out incepted 'Inception' which makes it one of the best science fiction films of the year so far."

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  • The Playlist
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    Found Footage Alien Pic 'Dark Moon' Dropped By Warner Bros., Picked Up By Dark Castle

    And Will End Up Being Released By Warner Bros. AnywayAs an example of how fickle, fleeting and ultimately ridiculous Hollywood can get, following the plug being pulled on Roland Emmerich's low budget, found footage project "The Zone" yesterday, Warner Bros. followed suit, putting into turnaround the found footage spec script "Dark Moon" they picked up only a couple of weeks ago for six figures. The twist? They're gonna end up releasing it anyway.

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  • The Playlist
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    'The Fighter' Premieres At AFI, Early Reviews Peg Film As Mainstream Crowdpleaser & Actors' Showcase

    David O. Russell's "The Fighter" is one of the year's awards horses that is yet to screen for critics, but last night, Paramount pulled a last minute, stealth premiere screening at the AFI Fest. Tickets were on a first come, first served basis, and there was a limited press allocation as well. Mark Wahlberg was on hand to introduce the film and told the audience, "....and if there’s anyone out there who doesn’t like it I will come to your house and do hard labor." And it looks like he doesn't have to worry about raking leaves in someone's backyard.

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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    Feign of Terror: Chris Morris's "Four Lions"

    One could have been forgiven for flippantly wondering, when George W. Bush announced in November 2001 that any country harboring terrorists would be held accountable, which British city might be first on the list for U.S. air strikes. Manchester, perhaps? Bradford? Birmingham? Nine U.K. citizens in total have been held at Guantanamo Bay, a fact that, with apologies to Michael Winterbottom and his 2006 documentary Road to Guantanamo, was largely overlooked in the U.K. until the suicide-bomb attacks on London by four British Muslims on July 7, 2005. Without name-checking these events, Four Lions clearly takes its inspiration from the 7/7 bombings and emerges as a ruthless and thought-provoking exposure of British jihadism.

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