Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
Celebrating 17 Years of Film.Biz.Fans.

the Blogs

recent Posts

  • The Lost Boys
    0 comments

    Last Post Before The Rapture

    See y'all in hell next week...

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    0 comments

    Michel Gondry Says He'll Be Directing A French Language Film Starring Audrey Tautou

    'The We And The I' Still On Track To Shoot This SummerWith the numbers now all counted up, Michel Gondry's first foray into tentpole studio filmmaking with "The Green Hornet" earlier this year can be called a success. The film, budgeted at $120 million pulled in over $220 million worldwide, more than half of that coming from those increasingly important foreign territories. While we imagine Sony might have wanted a bigger number for their superhero film, for a movie with Seth Rogen in the lead and a virtually unknown (at least on this side of the ocean) Jay Chou in a supporting role they have to be satisfied that the roll of the dice paid off. But the director isn't ready to return to big money filmmaking just yet and has a number of lower key projects on his plate and has just added a seemingly new one with a big actress on board.

    Read More »
  • Thompson on Hollywood
    0 comments

    Cannes Filmmaker Preview: Nuri Bilge Ceylan is Master of Distance

    In our continuing series on Cannes competition directors, Simon Abrams offers a mini-profile of Once Upon a Time In Anatolia's photographer/filmmaker Nuri Bilge Ceylan, shown here at Cannes in 2008 after winning the Best Director prize for Three Monkeys. Country: Turkey Most Telling Film Title: Distant. The rift created by physical and/or psychological distance between characters is key to all of Ceylan’s films, including this drama about an unemployed man who temporarily moves in with his estranged cousin. Most Accessible Film: Climates. Ceylan’s most atypically sensual film, about a disjointed ménage a trois with an actress, a college professor and his friend’s fiance, is his best thus far. He uses an uncharacteristic but satisfying series of close-ups during the opening beach scene. Ceylan’s chilly but weirdly coquettish style takes hold by film’s end.

    Read More »
  • Spout
    0 comments

    What Movie Would You Watch One More Time if You Knew the World Was Ending?

    I am actually rather surprised at how big this Rapture prediction for May 21st has gotten. The Internet is crazy with apocalyptic material, and I'm now seeing "end of the world" happy hours and barbecues being planned for tomorrow as if giant UFOs have shown up above all the major cities and we're certain either our time has come or we're expecting a visit from mystical icons, or aliens (maybe you consider Jesus to be both). I feel everyone's acting like a mix of Kiersten Warren in "Independence Day" (see above) and the unconcerned grasshopper of the Aesop fable. And it's kind of funny. Unless it's really going to happen.

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    0 comments

    In Theaters: 'Pirates,' 'Paris,' And Not Much Else

    Yaarrghh! Mateys! It's time for another installment of "Pirates of the Caribbean: Let's Cash Some Checks"!!! Johnny's got the mortgage on his private island in France to pay off, so let's get the gang back together. Dig the dreadlock wigs out of storage and rustle up some mermaids, we've got bills to pay! So you can go see that in theaters this weekend. Or you can go see the fresh-from-the Croisette "Midnight in Paris," a delightful entry into the Woody Allen canon. Owen Wilson! He's perfect for a Woody Allen movie, why didn't we figure this out before?! Have you checked out our extensive Allen retrospective? It's tearing Playlist HQ apart! Epithets have been hurled; gauntlets have been thrown. So those are your choices for this weekend. Alternatively, you can re-read the reviews from Cannes and cry that you haven't seen "The Tree of Life" or "Drive" yet. That sounds fun too.

    Read More »
  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
    0 comments

    Sentimental Education: Woody Allen's "Midnight in Paris"

    Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris begins with a remarkably extended series of lovingly framed shots of the city of light. Initially it’s reminiscent of the opening credit sequence for Richard Linklater’s Before Sunset, but the sheer length of this moving photo album clues us in that something different is going on. The images unfurl with such unceasing beauty that it almost becomes too much: sure, we get the Eiffel Tower, the Seine, the Champs-Elysées, the Moulin Rouge windmill, Notre-Dame, but also less hallowed nooks and crannies, sundappled cobblestone, the steps of Montmartre from a variety of angles. The images take us from morning to night, all in the space of an entire song, which Allen allows to play out in its entirety.

    Read More »
  • Thompson on Hollywood
    0 comments

    Emmy Watch: Mad Men’s Matthew Weiner Talks Trend-Setting Future Seasons

    Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner opened up during a Lionsgate-sponsored panel Wednesday at the Television Academy theater in North Hollywood that also featured cast members Jon Hamm, Elizabeth Moss, John Slattery, Robert Morse, Jared Harris, Kiernan Shipka and others. (We're getting closer to the June Emmy balloting period.) Amy Dawes reports:The news that two new shows steeped in early ‘60s style and social mores have made the networks’ fall lineup was not lost on Matthew Weiner. “For them to see that there’s some commercial potential in this area, four years after we got it going – that’s pretty brave,” he said sardonically, referring to ABC and NBC, which have picked up Pan Am and The Playboy Club, respectively.

    Read More »
  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
    0 comments

    RS 29—Farmed Out: "Winter's Bone" and "Country"

    Both Debra Granik’s 2010 Academy Award–nominated indie thriller Winter’s Bone and Richard Pearce’s 1984 farm saga Country, the first release from Walt Disney’s Touchstone Pictures studio, and that year’s New York Film Festival opening night film, focus on families struggling to save their homes from seizure by government agents. Bone’s teenaged Ree Dolly (Jennifer Lawrence) acts as single parent to two younger siblings in the wake of her meth-dealing father Jessup’s disappearance and severely mentally ill mother’s slide into oblivion. One afternoon, bailiffs show up in the debris-strewn yard of their small rickety home threatening to foreclose on the place if her father doesn’t present himself at an upcoming court date; seems dear old dad used the house as collateral for his bail. Ree has little idea where Jessup is and the neighbors who might know aren’t kindly disposed towards young girls poking into the area’s bustling meth trade. Barely schooled, but apparently in possession of some true grit, she ventures off into the menacingly lensed Ozark backwoods in search of her father.

    Read More »
    More: new issue
  • Leonard Maltin
    0 comments

    movie review—Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides

    Remember how fresh and novel Pirates of the Caribbean seemed in 2003? Remember the fun of seeing Johnny Depp’s off-the-wall portrayal of Captain Jack Sparrow for the first time? It may be hard to think back that far, because the lumbering, pointless sequels have buried every trace of spontaneity and given us “more of the same” in heavy doses.

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    0 comments

    Cannes Review: Rambling, Ragged 'This Must Be The Place' Isn't Nearly As Bad As You Feared

    The initial first glimpses for "This Must Be The Place" promised disaster, with a pitch of Sean Penn playing a burned-out post-punk rocker on the hunt for Nazis, and advance photos where Penn's jet-black corona of hair and dour made-up jowls made him look less like someone who had imitated The Cure's Robert Smith and more like someone who had killed, skinned and eaten Smith before donning his coiffure and face in celebration.

    Read More »