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  • Shadow and Act
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    African & Caribbean Filmmakers To Gather In Cuba To Talk Collaborating (Danny Glover Leads Charge)

    I'm only just now becoming aware of this... I'll certainly be tracking it from here on to see what comes of meeting... Glad to see Danny Glover leading the charge in the spirit of Pan-Africanism:

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  • The Playlist
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    Dustin Hoffman's Directorial Debut 'Quartet' Finally Gets Underway

    Billy Connolly, Pauline Collins & Michael Gambon Join Maggie Smith & Tom Courtenay In CastIt's somewhat surprising, given that most actors give it a shot at one point or another in their career, even if they never go back to it, that Dustin Hoffman has never stepped behind the camera to direct a film. He has, after all, won awards a-plenty, and been a fully-fledged, albeit unorthodox, giant movie star, for most of his career. The closest Hoffman came to helming a picture was 1978's Straight Time, a project that eventually ended up in the hands of Ulu Grosbard (1995's Georgia) - that is, until now.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    In the Works: Kelly Reilly On Board Washington's Flight; Farmiga, Arkin & MacLaine; Nolte & Waits

    Denzel Washington has a leading lady for Robert Zemeckis' Flight. It's Kelly Reilly, who we suggested to play Daisy Buchanan before Carey Mulligan snagged the role in Baz Luhrmann's 3-D The Great Gatsby. You'll recognize the British Reilly from Sherlock Holmes (the first and upcoming sequel, as Jude Law's lady love) and Pride & Prejudice (Caroline Bingley). She deserves to be showcased, and this should be a meaty role. Here are Flight plot details.

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  • The Playlist
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    Review: David Mackenzie's Music Festival Rom-Com 'You Instead' Has A Tin Ear

    Not many films are set at music festivals. D.A. Pennebaker’s documentary, “Monterey Pop” is vital, we’ll grant you, and other rock docs that expose something fundamental about the artists they’re profiling (“Don’t Look Back,” “Gimme Shelter”) remain compelling portraits of some of the most important artists of the twentieth-century. But, much like stand-up comedy or running for high office, fictional recreations of what compels a human being to get up onstage in front of thousands of people and expose themselves to the public at large, are far and few between.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Will Jeffrey Wright Be In The Upcoming James Bond Film?

    While promoting his role in George Clooney's The Ides Of March at the Toronto Film Festival, Jeffrey Wright told ComingSoon that he has not "gotten the call to return" to the upcoming 007 movie currently in the early stages of production.

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    More: FYI
  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Toronto Reviews: Acquisition Comedies Westfeldt's Friends with Kids; Farino's The Oranges

    Buyers are lining up for the more commercial-looking movies on display at Toronto, from horror flicks The Raid and The Incident, about cooks left behind in an insane asylum, to relationship comedies Friends with Kids and The Oranges. Partners Jennifer Westfeldt (Kissing Jessica Stein, Ira & Abby) and Jon Hamm (Mad Men) produced and co-star in Manhattan-set Friends with Kids, which Westfeldt also wrote and directed. Westfeldt approached Jake Kasdan to direct, but he and many others told her that this project was so personal that she should take the helm. She's a better filmmaker than she is a movie star; the sharply observed comedy about a group of friends, two married couples with kids and two single best friends who decide to have a baby together without romantic entanglement, would have been better served with Westfeldt in a supporting role, with the underutilized Kristen Wiig in the lead. The otherwise well-cast ensemble also includes Wiig's Bridesmaids co-stars Maya Rudolph and Chris O’Dowd, as well as Edward Burns and Megan Fox. But Adam Scott (Parks and Recreation) emerges as a rising star, and the movie will find both distributor and audience.

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  • The Playlist
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    Oliver Hirschbiegel To Re-Team With 'Five Minutes of Heaven' Writer For Thriller 'Eye In The Sky'

    Basically no-one saw "Five Minutes Of Heaven." Which was a shame, because it was a powerful drama of guilt and reconciliation set amongst the Troubles in Northern Ireland, was easily German director Oliver Hirschbiegel's best since "Downfall," and showcased excellent performances from James Nesbitt and Liam Neeson, the latter given a now-rare opportunity to do something other than punch Europeans in the head.

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  • The Playlist
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    I Feel The Need, The Need For 3D: 'Top Gun' 3D Re-Release In The Works

    The honeymoon has certainly been over for 3D in 2011; U.S. audience have been staying away from the format in droves, choosing to seek out 2D screenings of blockbusters, and it all culminated in August in a goggled-clusterfuck where "Final Destination 5," "Conan," "Fright Night" and "Spy Kids 4" all cannibalized each other, while 2D pictures "Rise of the Planet of the Apes" and "The Help" dominated the box office. But Hollywood executives aren't done with wringing every penny that they can from the format. The next phase? taking proven blockbusters and giving them the headache-y, pop up book treatment.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Colin Salmon To Return From The Dead In "Resident Evil: Retribution"

    Even though his character, James "One" Shade, was killed off in the original 2002 film Resident Evil, actor Colin Salmon is said to be reprising the role in the upcoming Screen Gems-produced sequel, Resident Evil: Retribution.

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  • The Playlist
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    TIFF '11 Review: 'Machine Gun Preacher' Is Essentially A Botched 'Rambo'

    In 2008’s blitzkrieg actioner “Rambo,” writer-director Sylvester Stallone recognized the real-life struggles of the people of Myanmar, dramatizing the struggle in a blood-drenched exploitation film that, despite its inelegance, emboldened the people of that region while lionizing a fictional hero of guerilla warfare. The problem with “Machine Gun Preacher,” Marc Forster’s third world drama about a real-life would-be savior who ventured into the Sudan and attempted to build an orphanage with sheer will and a smidgen of gunpower, is that it’s afraid to be “Rambo.”

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