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  • Shadow and Act
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    First Official Poster For "The Dark Knight Rises" + First Trailer Due This Weekend

    The first official trailer will reportedly be attached to prints of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - Part 2, which opens this weekend.

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  • The Playlist
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    Martin Scorsese's 'Hugo' Gets A Heart-Shaped Key & 'The Thing' Isn't Human (Yet) On New Posters

    Well, it's officially official. Due to some pretty boneheaded decision made up in a studio executive's office, Martin Scorsese's "Hugo Cabret" has indeed dropped half of the title to become simply "Hugo." Likely terrified that audiences might not know how to pronounce that six-letter word and fearing that it would lead to audiences abandoning the film altogether, it's yet another example of big Hollywood treating their customers like morons. Anyway, it appears that posters are now popping up in multiplexes across the nation as ComingSoon snapped a picture of one in Los Angeles. It features Isabelle's heart-shaped key that proves to be a major component of the story as told in Brian Selznick's award-winning book, on which the film is based. Led by Asa Butterfield and Chloë Moretz, with a cast including Sacha Baron Cohen, Ben Kingsley, Christopher Lee, Emily Mortimer, Jude Law, Michael Stuhlbarg, Emily Mortimer and Ray Winstone the 1931-set film follows the story of the eponymous orphan boy living a secret life in the walls of a Paris train station. When Hugo encounters a broken machine, an eccentric girl, and the cold, reserved man who runs the toy shop, he is caught up in a magical, mysterious adventure that could put all of his secrets in jeopardy. It opens on November 23rd, and yes, it's in 3D

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  • Women and Hollywood
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    Guest Post: Interview with Sophia Takal - Writer/Director of Green by Melissa Silvestri

    Actress/writer Sophia Takal’s directorial debut, Green, is a film that is both dark in its themes of jealousy, yet shines with a natural ease depicting the burgeoning friendship of two very different women. Green focuses on a young Brooklyn couple, Sebastian (Laurence Michael Levine) and Genevieve (Kate Lyn Sheil) who come out to a cabin in the woods where Sebastian is going to cover gardening and country life for his hipster blog, a city mouse meets the country sort of feel. Genevieve puts up with Sebastian’s pretentiousness because she doesn’t have a secure identity of her own, and it takes the friendship of Robin (Takal), a local woman, to bring out her confidence. But though Genevieve and Robin share an ease with one another, it slowly twists into a dark path in Genevieve’s mind, when she concocts cheating fantasy scenarios between Sebastian and Robin that threaten to destroy her relationships.

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  • Caryn James
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    Jon Stewart Can't Believe the "News of the World" Scandal

    The best analysis I've read of the widening News of the World phone-hacking scandal is Carl Bernstein's acute analysis in Newsweek, "Murdoch's Watergate?" which also looks at the nefarious influence of Rupert Murdoch's U.S. empire. Bernstein's description of "the unfair and imbalanced politicized 'news' of the Fox News Channel" is sharp and perfect.

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  • Hope for Film
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    Guest Post: Set Kushner "Remembering Harvey Pekar"

    Today marks the first anniversary of Harvey Pekar's death. Very few people have had as great an influence on my life as Harvey. I was very fortunate to be able to collaborate with him and bring AMERICAN SPLENDOR to the screen.I was thrilled to be approached by Seth Kushner about his current tribute to Harvey. I offer you a glimpse of it here.

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  • The Playlist
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    Watch: Trailer For Vera Farmiga's Directorial Debut 'Higher Ground'

    With an Academy Award nomination under her belt for "Up In The Air," Vera Farmiga followed her awards season recognition by taking on a mix of roles in films as diverse as the unfortunately awful "Henry's Crime," the sci-fi time looper "Source Code," the studio action film "Safe House" and the indie drama "Goats." But perhaps the biggest move the actress has made is deciding to get behind the camera with her debut feature "Higher Ground," a film that earned strong notices out of Sundance in January and will hit theaters later this year.

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  • The Playlist
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    Review: 'Daylight' An Uneven But Compelling Psychological Drama

    Few people will disparage an expectant mother. People are people, good and bad, but there's something majestic, alluring, and graceful about a pregnant female. It's some inexplicable aura that surrounds them, a soft soothing light that alters the mood of anyone they come in contact with. A meaningful moment with one is akin to a divine experience. It's this logic that permeates David Barker's "Daylight."

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  • The Playlist
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    Down With Aladeen! New Protest Set Pics From 'The Dictator'

    Yes, Sacha Baron Cohen is back and after "Borat" and "Bruno" the comedian is bring a double dose of new characters to the big screen with "The Dictator." Co-starring Ben Kingsley, Jason Mantzoukas, Anna Faris and J.B. Smoove with cameos from Megan Fox and John C. Reilly, the film is described as a cross between “Coming to America” and “Trading Places,” with Cohen playing both a goat herder and a deposed foreign dictator who gets lost in the United States. We've already had a few looks at Cohen as the titular ruler but some new set pics have hit the official blog giving us a peek at his other character.

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  • The Playlist
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    Review: 'Winnie the Pooh' Is A Cuddly, Gorgeously Animated Treat

    There have been a lot of animated movies released this year, but virtually none of them has been any good. The technology, while increasingly sophisticated and skilled at rendering lifelike Easter bunnies and parrots and pandas and oddly anthropomorphic automobiles, seems to be brought to the screen at the cost of a similar sophistication in storytelling. Which is why "Winnie the Pooh," Disney's new take on the beloved A.A. Milne character, rendered, lovingly, in comparatively low-tech traditional animation, comes as such a surprise. It might be the greatest animated feature of the year so far (besides "Rango") – and you don't even have to wear dorky 3D glasses.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Page Eight Review: Weisz and Fiennes Give David Hare’s Directing Comeback a Boost

    London critic Matt Mueller reviews Page Eight, respected scribe David Hare's BBC-backed bid for respect as a director, which debuted at the Edinburgh Film Festival last month. It was going to take something special to attract Rachel Weisz and Ralph Fiennes back to the small screen: David Hare stepping behind the camera for the first time in 15 years turned out to be it. Directing his own script, Hare serves up a stylish political feature that’s a purposeful throwback to 1960s British espionage thrillers like The Ipcress File and, in Bill Nighy, finds the perfect actor to play his quintessentially English protagonist: Johnny Worricker, a long-serving MI5 intelligence analyst who’s forged a successful career by fading into the background but comes out of the shadows when his boss (Michael Gambon) unveils a dossier showing the UK government knew all along about America’s top-secret torture prisons.

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