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  • Shadow and Act
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    Scott Feinberg Interviews Michael K. Williams (Video)

    Scott Feinberg Interviews Michael K. Williams (Video)

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    More: Watch Now
  • The Playlist
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    Robert Zemeckis In Talks To Direct Tom Hanks In 3D Toy Adaptation 'Major Matt Mason'

    HBO Adaptation Of Neil Gaiman's 'American Gods' Planned To Be Effects-Heavy Six Season SeriesThe colossal failure of motion-capture animation "Mars Needs Moms," and the subsequent cancellation by Disney on the planned performance capture remake of "Yellow Submarine," seems to have given Robert Zemeckis, something of a pioneer of the format, pause for thought. The director of mega-hits like "Back to the Future" and "Forrest Gump" hasn't made a live action picture since 2000's double bill of "What Lies Beneath" and "Cast Away," but recent months have seen him linked to any number of potential projects starring real people, rather than dead-eyed facsimiles, including a remake of "The Wizard of Oz" (not happening, thank God), "The Man of Steel," a sequel to "Roger Rabbit," and long-gestating time travel romance "Replay."

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  • Hope for Film
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    Your Second Chance: New Faces Of NYC Indie Film Video

    We had a packed house at Lincoln Center for our "New Faces Of NYC Indie Film" panel. It was a good conversation. Sure, my game show idea did not work out, but hey, when you have eleven people up on the stage with you, it means you have eleven people not talking and that's hard to keep it lively. Luckily, all eleven people had a lot to say and are clearly a group of passionate and committed filmmakers, making sacrifices for the privilege of making their art. If you didn't get there, now through the miraculous power of the internet, you can give us two hours of your time and see what it is you missed.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Maverick Distributor Marty Zeidman Changed Face of Indie Cinema

    Maverick Distributor Marty Zeidman Changed Face of Indie Cinema

    Inside the independent film community, Marty Zeidman was known as an innovator who changed the way independent movies were released. The distributor who worked at Miramax, Polygram, Sony Pictures Entertainment, Fine Line, Lionsgate, Paramount Classics and Columbia Pictures died at age 63 in Los Angeles on Wednesday, June 8, 2011, from complications due to pancreatitis. He also worked in exhibition for many years as head buyer at Landmark Theatres, and most recently, owned indie distributor Slow Hand Releasing (Innocent Voices, Kids in America and U2: the Concert Movie).

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  • Shadow and Act
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    The First Black Men In Outer Space (In The Movies That Is...)

    All the heated discussion we had recently about black images in sci-fi movies bought to my mind recently the first time when a black man first appeared as an astronaut in a sci-fi movie. And you would be right in guessing that it wasn't in an American film.

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    More: FYI
  • SydneysBuzz
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    N.Y.’s WBAI Supports Creative Coalition's Spotlight Initiative Films

    Ah, New York, the haven for independent films: Even WBAI 99.5, New York City’s pre-eminent radio station supporting the arts, supports it in a new partnership announced today with The Creative Coalition’s Spotlight Initiative program. The Spotlight Initiative integrates public and private support for selected independent films.

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  • The Playlist
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    Rewind: Tarantino, 'X-Men: First Class,' Tom Hanks & More In The Week In Movies, June 5th-June 11th

    It's been a quieter week for The Playlist. In the heart of the summer, without many new releases, it's hard to drum up more than a little "X-Men" chatter. Still, there were no shortage of discussion topics this week, including Will Smith Scientology rumors, the growing cast for "Moonrise Kingdom" and even more "Girl With The Dragon Tattoo" talk.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Seattle International Film Festival Closing Weekend: Shocking Sex and Violence in Flying Fish

    Seattle International Film Festival Closing Weekend: Shocking Sex and Violence in Flying Fish

    The Seattle International Film Festival is finally drawing to a close this weekend, and our peripatetic fest chronicler Meredith Brody is back there.Let’s see: I’ve been a few places since I was in Seattle for the Film Festival’s opening weekend, a little more than two weeks ago. Whether I was seeing Glee in Concert in San Jose, or watching my goddaughter graduate from Brown, or trudging all over New York in sweltering heat from museum to theater, somewhere in the back of my head I was aware that back in cool, grey Seattle, movie after movie was unspooling at more than a dozen different venues, in what they’re pleased to call the “largest film festival in the country.” I’m pleased to be returning for its closing weekend, even though it means finding myself back at Oakland Airport about eight hours after I land there from the steamy East Coast.

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  • Spout
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    How Many Movies Can You Fit Into a Wedding?

    I have scheduled this post to go live just as my own wedding begins. As you're reading this (likely sometime after it's gone live), imagine I'm currently walking down the aisle to Carl Orff's "Gassenhauer nach Hans Neusiedler (1536)," which you may know as 'the "Badlands" theme.' And that's not the first cinematic tune to play, either. Pre-ceremony we've already heard "Somebody's Getting Married" from "The Muppets Take Manhattan" and George and Ira Gershwin's "He Loves and She Loves," which we know from Woody Allen's "Manhattan," not to mention tunes that can be found on the soundtracks to "Rushmore" and "Swingers" -- though neither was chosen because of their film use.

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  • The Playlist
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    Jeremy Renner To Produce & Star In Underdog Rally Race Picture, 'Slingshot'

    Here's a disturbing trend of late. Didn't "Days Of Thunder" teach us anything? Sure, "Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby" showed us there's laughs to be found within the world of auto racing, but seriously, how many great films of this genre can you name? "Death Race 2000," "Two-Lane Blacktop" and "Grand Prix" are three that come to mind, though "great" is a relative term here (if you named the "Fast & Furious" series and or the "Cannonball Run" films, kindly vacate your seat and leave our chapel, please).

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