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  • The Lost Boys
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    To Be a Fly on the Wall In The Star-Studded Tribeca Film Festival Jury Deliberations

    The Tribeca Film Festival announced its juries today and as per usual, it's ridiculously full of notable names, including David O. Russell, David Gordon Green, Dianne Wiest, Patrick Wilson, Christine Vachon, Souleymane Cisse, Whoopi Goldberg, Paul Dano, Zoe Kazan, Rainn Wilson, Anna Kendrick, Michael Cera, Denis Leary, Atom Egoyan and Fran Lebowitz. Some of the pairings are fascinating to consider... Dianne Wiest, Jason Sudeikis and David Gordon Green arguing over the narrative competition? Michael Cera and Whoopi Goldberg debating docs? Paul Dano, Rainn Wilson, Atom Egoyan and Anna Kendrick taking on the emerging narratives? Christine Vachon, Zoe Kravitz and Patrick Wilson debating doc and student shorts? And the kicker: Denis Leary, Fran Lebowitz, Nora Ephron, David O. Russell and Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales all watching the narrative shorts. Tribeca should really start filming deliberations and screening them.

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  • The Playlist
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    Logan Lerman Will Be 'The Only Living Boy In New York' For Director Seth Gordon

    Logan Lerman isn't yet twenty, but the actor is quickly rising. He nabbed his first tentpole role in "Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief" -- which has a sequel in the works -- and he's got "The Three Musketeers" arriving later this year and he's set to star in "The Perks Of Being A Wallflower" which will go in front of cameras later this spring. And he's shoring up his resumé with another character driven piece.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Cannes Preview: Von Trier's Romantic Melancholia, Pitt & Penn, Miss Bala & Habemus Papam

    - Melancholia is the name of Lars von Trier's Cannes-bound film, which features a huge planet that dooms Earth. Von Trier tells Empire that he "liked the idea of being 'swallowed' by Melancholia. I thought that was quite nice. And then I read today that that's actually one of the virtues of romanticism – willingly being purified by dying. In fact, the film contains maybe more of the original idea of romanticism. I'm just saying that a lot of films today, their interpretation of romanticism is... quite boring, I think.” As to how the director--who is legendary for abusing actors from Charlotte Gainsbourg (Antichrist) and Bjork (Dancer in the Dark) to Nicole Kidman (Dogville)--treated star Kirsten Dunst [pictured], he adds: “I think that Kirsten got off FAR too easy. FAR too easy. She was not dragged through any masturbation. She had a very smooth ride, I would say. But she did an extremely good job.”

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  • The Playlist
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    Watch: Longer Trailer For Curtis Hanson's HBO's Financial Crisis Drama 'Too Big To Fail'

    Even though we're kinda fatigued on the subject, "Too Big To Fail," directed by Curtis Hanson and featuring a remarkable ensemble, has certainly grabbed our attention.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Indian Film Festival of Los Angeles Announces Winners, Lead By Udaan

    The Indian Film Festival of Los Angeles announces its 2011 winners, who were announced at the April 17 gala closing of the fest. Disney's Zokkomon (opens stateside April 22) also had its world premiere at the gala. The festival screened 32 features, docs and shorts at Hollywood's ArcLight.

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  • The Playlist
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    Jason Statham Goes Noir In 'Parker' Directed By Taylor Hackford, Penned By 'Black Swan' Co-Writer

    Taylor Hackford already has an Oscar. No, no it's not for "Ray," it's actually for "Teenage Father," a short film he directed way, way back in 1979. And his filmography is mostly dramatic fare, stuff like "An Officer and a Gentleman," "Dolores Claiborne," "Proof Of Life" and last year's "Love Ranch." But as he closes in on seventy years old, Hackford is ready to get gritty.

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  • Spout
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    Short Starts: "Water for Elephants" Star Robert Pattinson in "The Summer House"

    As a shorts fanatic I get very excited about anthology films. These projects, like “Paris, Je T’aime” and “Four Rooms,” are great opportunities for multiple directors to work on the same theme and then bring it all together in a single collection. They don’t happen terribly often these days, probably because they’re hard to market well for the box office, but they’re often successful and always interesting. 2010’s “Love and Distrust,” while not a showpiece of famous directors, stars some pretty famous talent, including Robert Pattinson in the understated drama “The Summer House.”

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  • The Playlist
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    New Picture From 'Melancholia'; Lars Von Trier Says Kirsten Dunst "Got Off Easy" During Filming

    As we've read and witnessed already, thanks to an early trailer, Lars Von Trier's latest film, "Melancholia," is about two sisters who find their relationship challenged as a nearby planet threatens to collide into the Earth. So it's a sci-fi-tinged picture, but as the trailer evinces it's also like a wedding-based melodrama -- "Margot At The Wedding As We're All Doomed," or something, with shades of Bergman. It looks much more like a film about psychological angst, anxiety and human ugliness (natch, it's Von Trier) than it does an end-of-days apocalyptic picture.

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  • The Playlist
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    Watch: Scene From 'Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows Part 2' Featuring Harry & Mr. Ollivander

    This summer marks the end of an era. The "Harry Potter" phenomenon will close with "Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows Part 2." It will be the last time Daniel Radcliffe and the gang get their wizard on and fans around the world will be flocking to the theaters to watch it all end.

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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    Direct Address #11: Bertrand Tavernier

    Reverse Shot trashes a hotel room with French director Bertrand Tavernier (La Princesse de Montpensier, Round Midnight), then chats with him about historical accuracy, creative urgency, and film criticism.

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