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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Two Social Network Clips, NYFF Press Conference, Live MySpace Webcast

    Check out these two clips from David Fincher's The Social Network, starring Jesse Eisenberg as Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, which opens the NYFF Friday night. And here's a link to the NYFF press conference. Billionaire Zuckerberg, 26, appears on Oprah Friday to announce his $100-million donation to the Newark schools, one week before The Social Network opens. "People don't care what people say about you in a movie," he told ABC's Diane Sawyer, "they care what you build." Fascinating interview. Eisenberg got the eyes right.

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  • Leonard Maltin
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    film review—Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps

    I’m not a fan of sequels, by and large, but I suppose events of the past few years made it inevitable that someone would devise a followup to Oliver Stone’s Wall Street, which became a touchstone of its era. The new movie isn’t likely to have the same effect, as so many documentaries are covering the financial debacle, with more to come…but it certainly is entertaining.

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  • Jared Moshé's Blog
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    Have you purchased your copy of LOW & BEHOLD yet?

    After an incredible festival run that began at the Sundance Film Festival Low and Behold is currently available on DVD via the film's store. This is a film I'm incredibly proud have been a producer on. The first feature shot on location in a devastated New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina, the film uses a hybrid documentary/narrative approach to explore the mental and physical story of of the city and its people. Low and Behold is a beautiful film. Take the opportunity to experience it for yourself.

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    More: Sidetrack
  • ReelPolitik
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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    NBC Universal Chairman Jeff Zucker to Step Down When Comcast Deal Closes

    It's official. In a staff memo, NBC Universal chairman Jeff Zucker, 45, announces that he will leave his post when the Comcast takeover of NBC Universal is complete, probably by year's end, reports the NYT. The writing had been on the wall for some time. Zucker admitted that Comcast wants to bring in their own management team. NBC is the only place Zucker has ever worked, for 24 1/2 years. He tells the NYT he's a producer at heart; his happiest time was producing The Today Show. And yes, Zucker is interested in politics.

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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    Beat Down: Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman's "Howl"

    “Sir, you cannot translate poetry into prose,” remarks academic Mark Schorer (Treat Williams) during a section of Howl covering the 1957 obscenity trial surrounding Allen Ginsberg’s eponymous poem. “That’s why it is poetry.” Schorer is commenting upon the prosecutorial style of San Francisco attorney Ralph McIntosh (David Strathairn), whose case against the controversial piece involved asking “expert witnesses” to concretely define the various sexual allusions and lyrical abstractions that Ginsberg liberally sprinkled throughout his masterwork. However, he could very well be referring to the plight of writer-directors Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman, whose film attempts to tease out the legal, social, and biographical significance of Ginsberg’s groundbreaking generational ode without explaining away its propulsive, elusive essence. Documentarians whose previous films chronicled such LGBT topics as queer representation in American cinema (The Celluloid Closet) and the persecution of gay men in Nazi Germany (Paragraph 175), Epstein and Friedman have publicly stated their desire to forego in Howl the talking-heads-and-archival-footage approach in favor of something more diffuse and allusive. This turns out to be a triptych structure, which interweaves a re-enactment of the 1957 obscenity trial; an imagined interview with Ginsberg (James Franco) occurring at roughly the same historic moment as the trial, accompanied by brief flashbacks to Ginsberg’s younger self; and a recreation of Ginsberg’s original reading of “Howl” at San Francisco’s Six Gallery on October 7, 1955. As Ginsberg recites the poem onstage, surrealistic animated interludes illustrate its images and ideas.

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  • eugonline
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    digital strategy

    A bunch of people recently spent a lot of time trying to figure out how and when to announce the news that I'd be leaving indieWIRE. I'd made the decision a week ago in Toronto and was anxious to share the news with friends and colleagues in as transparent a manner as possible. I had nothing to hide, was excited about my decision and felt that indieWIRE would be not only survive, but thrive after my departure.

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    More: indieWIRE
  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Steve Bass, Production Designer for 83rd Academy Awards Show

    Steve Bass, Production Designer for 83rd Academy Awards Show

    Oscar producers Bruce Cohen and Don Mischer announce that Steve Bass will serve as production designer for the 83rd Academy Awards show on February 27, 2011, at Hollywood's Kodak Theatre.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Variety Loses Bill Higgins to Hollywood Reporter

    Score another win for The Hollywood Reporter in its ongoing challenge to weakened Variety and Deadline, which are both seeing traffic declines as THR reaps spikes from new editorial director Janice Min's edgier, newsier content. Now after a decade covering the party scene for Variety, Bill Higgins has moved into the THR offices on Wilshire Boulevard as a staff writer covering parties and Hollywood philanthropy for the invigorated trade, which is doubling staff as it transitions in the next month to a newstand weekly glossy. Higgins now joins recent hires Kim Masters, Allison Hope Weiner and executive editor Owen Phillips (glossy WSJ) at Min's daily editorial meetings. Up next: a gossip columnist.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Beaver Director Foster is Loyal to Gibson, but Forget Oscars

    Beaver Director Foster is Loyal to Gibson, but Forget Oscars

    Jodie Foster and Mel Gibson have been close friends for sixteen years, since they met on the set of Maverick. Foster stands up for him each time he gets himself into terrible trouble--and worries about his drinking--and this time is no exception. She gave a long-lead interview to More Magazine, which was originally timed to come out in conjunction with the release of her new movie The Beaver, in which Gibson stars as a man who talks to a sock puppet. Word is, he's very good in the picture, which was in the mix for a Toronto berth worthy of a serious adult drama with awards potential. Foster described her star to More as the "easiest, nicest person I've ever worked with...The second I met him, I said, 'I will love this man for the rest of my life.' "

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