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  • ReelPolitik
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    "The Fog of War": Part II: Errol Morris Takes on Donald Rumsfeld

    Errol Morris, the Oscar-winning director of "The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara," about the infamous Vietnam-era Secretary of Defense, has a similar target up his sleeves: a new project on Donald Rumsfeld, the Secretary of Defense who helped plan the Iraq War and sanctioned America's policies of torture, according to a story in today's Vulture.

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  • The Playlist
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    Errol Morris Will Point The Interrotron At Donald Rumsfeld In A New Documentary

    Controversy has never scared off Errol Morris, and in fact, it has powered some of his best work. From the true crime tale "The Thin Blue Line," powerful portraits of war in "The Fog of War" and "Standard Operating Procedure," and more recently the JFK assassination (in the astounding short "The Umbrella Man"; watch it here) he has faced some tough material head on with tremendous insight. And his next effort promises nothing less.

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  • The Playlist
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    '21 Jump Street' Directors Chris Miller & Phil Lord Talk Deleted Scenes For DVD, Shooting Action & More

    One of the biggest compliments you can pay a movie like the new Jonah Hill/Channing Tatum vehicle "21 Jump Street" -- based on a old television property and seemingly hatched inside a coldly cynical meeting between studio chiefs and big-name action producers (in this case "Fast and Furious" overseer Neal H. Moritz) -- is what a huge surprise it is. If you had told us a few weeks ago that we would be staggering out of the theater, our sides aching from laughing too hard and our heads spinning from what a smart, fun, earnest, movie it was, we wouldn't have believed it ourselves. But it's true. "21 Jump Street" really is that good. And a big part of what makes it so fresh is that it comes from a couple of new live action directors – "Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs" helmers Chris Miller and Phil Lord. We talked to them about the transition from live action to animation, what they wanted to incorporate into the movie, and why Dave Franco asks Tatum about his choice in music.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Rashaad Ernesto Green's Acclaimed Drama "Gun Hill Road" Screens March 28 (Brooklyn)

    We've discussed this film at length on this site, so if you haven't yet seen it, or would just like another look, here's your chance.

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  • Women and Hollywood
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    Interview with Megan Griffiths - Director of SXSW Audience Winner Eden

    I was a little late to finding out about Eden but I am glad I did. It's a really good and interesting film on a difficult topic -- sex trafficking. We all think the sex trafficking occurs over there in countries far, far away. But it happens here ALL THE TIME. This film is based on a true story of a woman who was kidnapped by a cute guy she met in a bar. A normal night out with your friend ends up being the worst decision. The thing about trafficking is that it happens in plain site and many people in the culture perpetuate it - even guys with daughters. (That's the part that makes me so crazy. How can these dudes buy sex from women they know are held prisoner and not think about their own children.) The disconnect is amazing.

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  • The Playlist
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    SXSW '12 Review: Secrets, Revelations & An Unlikely Friendship Emerge In The Compelling 'Starlet'

    Sean Baker’s film “Starlet” wants to play a little trick on you. It’s a fun trick, and you might be more enjoyable figuring it out on your own, but it’s the most important and interesting part of the movie, so it’s hard to talk about its merits without giving it away. In fact, the main crux of the film isn’t interesting enough without the drama of the environment, the truth of which is slowly revealed throughout the first half of the film. You may be able to figure it out within the first sequence, but the fun is in how the film tells you what’s up.

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  • The Playlist
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    '24' Movie Won't Shoot In 2012; Apparently Was The Start Of A Trilogy With Antoine Fuqua Circling To Direct

    Looks like the clock has run out on "24." (Sorry.) Earlier this year, everything looked good to go on the long-gestating big screen outing for the hit TV show. Kiefer Sutherland hinted that the movie would be a direct continuation of the show, set six months after the series ended, with everything gearing up to shoot next month, once the actor was done with his work on his latest Fox show "Touch." But it looks like scheduling just couldn't be worked out.

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  • Caryn James
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    Will Ferrell Visits Jimmy Kimmel, En (Broken) Espagnol

    Whatever Casa de Mi Padre turns out to be – and it looks promising – Will Ferrell hasn’t fallen into the trap of promoting it with the same familiar answers on every talk show around. He has promoted it with different comic routines on every talk show around. The movie is a spoof of spaghetti Westerns, with the absurdist twist that it is made entirely in Spanish. To promote it on Jimmy Kimmel Live, Ferrell and Kimmel did their whole interview in intentionally mangled Spanish – at least that’s what the subtitles told me.

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  • The Playlist
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    'Gimme The Loot' & 'Beware Mr. Baker' Lead 2012 SXSW Award Winners; Battles' "My Machines" Takes Best Music Video

    ...and just like that, the SXSW Film Festival is winding down a close. There are only a few days left at the fest, and folks are beginning to have BBQ regret as they pack their bags to leave Austin. But before they do, the juries have weighed in and handed out the statues for the best of the fest.

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  • The Playlist
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    SXSW '12 Review: Pascal Laugier's 'The Tall Man' An Unfocused & Silly Horror Tale

    A few years ago there was a sort of mini-horror movie renaissance in France, with a bunch of talented young directors paying homage to their favorite American horror films the only way they knew how – by making them incredibly French. Under the stewardship of older French genre provocateurs (like Luc Besson and Christophe Gans), a new litter of spiky young filmmakers gave us visceral and challenging movies like "Them," "High Tension," "Frontier(s)," "Inside," and "Martyrs." The latter in particular was pretty heavily fawned over and picked up by The Weinstein Company for distribution through their Dimension shingle, although when it came time to release the film, they weren't sure what to do with such an extreme movie. Now the writer/director of "Martyrs," Pascal Laugier, is back with his first English language film, "The Tall Man." And whatever blood-splattered charm he might have mustered with "Martyrs," it isn't apparent now.

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