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  • iW NOW
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  • iW NOW
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    Well Go Takes "Legend" Ahead of Venice and Toronto

    Well Go USA announced today that it has acquired North American rights to "Legend of the Fist: The Return of Chen Zhen," starring Hong Kong action star Donnie Yen. The film was directed by Andrew Lau (Infernal Affairs, Confession of Pain), who also co-produced the film and served as a cinematographer alongside his frequent partner Ng Man-Ching. Gordon Chan co-wrote and co-produced the film, with John Chong serving as an executive producer and Donnie Yen as fight choreographer. The film is a co-production between Hong Kong film distributor Media Asia Films, Lau's production company Basic Pictures, and Chinese film producer Enlight Pictures.

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  • Spout
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    On the Rise: Aubrey Plaza of "Scott Pilgrim vs. the World"

    Sardonic should be up-and-comer Aubrey Plaza's middle name. The comedic actress, best known for her role as Seth Rogen's hipster love interest in Judd Apatow's "Funny People," knows her way around a good sarcastic jab. Her voice, mannerisms and bookish look are all enthused with a playful detachedness, like she's not in on her own funny girl shtick (think Sarah Silverman's less chipper twin sister). Judging by the rise she's on - as evidenced by her supporting role in Edgar Wright's massively hyped "Scott Pilgrim vs. the World" - Plaza's well aware.

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  • SydneysBuzz
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    The British Dilemma: UK Film Council Axed

    The bombshell dropped by Britain's government closing the U.K. Film Council with "no notice and no consultation" should send a collective shudder through the entire film community. Except for the U.S., all nations have government support for industry initiatives, education, film funding and their country's film distribution. The UK Film Council is the Government-backed lead agency for film in the UK ensuring that the economic, cultural and educational aspects of film are effectively represented at home and abroad.Below is the Guardian's story on it and the reactions of John Woodward, chief executive of the U.K. Films Council and Tim Bevan who chairs the council.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Early Reviews: The Expendables

    Early Reviews: The Expendables

    The two trades are split on the new action flick The Expendables, which I have been avoiding like the plague--clearly I am not in the target male demo. Interestingly, THR's Sheri Linden finds the testosterone fest worthwhile, while Variety's Peter Debruge does not. UPDATE: Time Out London does not mince words:

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  • Jared Moshé's Blog
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    The Venture Bros - New Season Trailer!

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    3-D Stats are Trending Down

    Hollywood would like to think that 3-D cures all ills. But the stats don't lie, as a discerning public picks and chooses the 3-D movies that are clearly worth paying a premium for. Check out The Wrap's analylsis of 3-D performance. The studios may want to reconsider throwing good money after bad when they try to buttress their returns on a bad B-movie with retrofitted 3-D. I quickly started to tune out Step Up 3-D, which actually had some good dancing, which I would much rather have seen in good old-fashioned 2-D. The intrusive 3-D wore out its welcome real fast. (Variety's Justin Chang disagrees.)

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  • iW NOW
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    New Audience Award for 2010 Gothams

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  • iW NOW
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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    What's up with Luis the gardener in "The Kids Are All Right"?

    So, yeah, Lisa Cholodenko’s The Kids Are All Right is fine.  The massive buzz left us suspicious: could the creator of Laurel Canyon possibly have churned out something worthy of so much hyperbole?  Well, no, but in this dolorous summer of movie tedium (Inception . . . zzzzz), it stands out.  Even if it has a distinctly uncinematic aesthetic (read: just past sitcom-level visual acuity), The Kids Are All Right features a nicely assembled screenplay that generously provides room for all its major characters to shine and be shitty by turns, which Cholodenko’s cast of skilled performers clearly relishes.  She even manages the reclamation of Annette Bening from the pastures of hysterical overacting.  As anyone who’s seen American Beauty or In Dreams can attest, subtlety isn’t her strong suit, but Cholodenko ably compresses the actress’s usually explosive tics into a believably high-strung career woman.  In fact, perhaps what’s best about The Kids Are All Right is that everyone in it feels like a real person.  Contrast that with the romantic comedy of Nancy Meyers: The Kids Are All Right isn’t far from It’s Complicated in intended audience effect (warm, knowing laughs) and interest in the many permutations of family, but one film is concerned with people, the other, movie stars acting out gilded fantasies.

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