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  • Women and Hollywood
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    The Arbor - Directed by Clio Barnard

    Clio Barnard takes the documentary form and stands it on its head with The Arbor a look at playwright Andrea Dunbar and her family. Dunbar grew up a working class kid on an estate in Bradford, England. She was able to take her experiences of her life write a play while in her teens which was produced at the Royal Court Theatre in London. She had incredible, raw talent yet she struggled with drugs and alcohol, had terrible relationships with men and sadly died of a brain aneurysm before 30. It's sad to think what she might have written had she lived.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Venice Film Fest 2011: Aronofsky to Head Competition Jury

    Darren Aronofsky considers the Venice Film festival to be his good-luck charm. He debuted in Venice both The Wrestler, which won the Golden Lion in 2008, and Black Swan, which opened the festival last year. Both went on to become top awards contenders; Natalie Portman won the best actress Oscar. His first film to compete in Venice was The Fountain in 2006.

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  • The Playlist
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    Tribeca Review: 'Puncture' With Chris Evans A True Story Weighed Down By Oscar Reel Antics

    “Puncture”In 1998, Jeffrey Dancourt created the one-stick syringe, which helped saved the lives of several medical professionals while keeping costs down for supplies in the medical industry. The problem was that the industry, already the beneficiary of multimillion dollar agreements with supplies companies, refused the device. “Puncture” deals with the man’s engagements with two working class lawyers, the only ones willing to take on an un-winnable case against millionaire lawyers and their enormously powerful representatives.

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    More: Review
  • The Playlist
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    Lizzy Caplan Says A 'Party Down' Movie Is More Likely Than An 'Arrested Development' Movie

    Exclusive: Oh, "Party Down." Yet another brilliant comedy that shone for a brief moment before getting canceled; ever since going off the air the witty, hilarious sitcom has slowly gained a new audience who are now just catching up with it on DVD. Created and written by John Enbom, Rob Thomas, Dan Etheridge and Paul Rudd, "Party Down" featured an amazing ensemble cast of Adam Scott, Ken Marino, Jane Lynch, Jennifer Coolidge, Megan Mullally, Ryan Hansen, Martin Starr and Lizzy Caplan, and chronicled the travails of an L.A. based catering company made up of actors and writers hoping to make it big, including one who already had a brief taste of the spotlight. The clever concept found the characters catering a different party each episode while the scripts slowly developed the arcs over the course of a season. It was definitely one of the best written shows on television at the time but alas, the ratings were poor and eventually the folks over at Starz gave it the axe.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Trailer Watch: Immortals Features Shiny Things Like Muscles, Women, Weapons and CGI

    The new HD trailer for Tarsem Singh's Immortals showcases muscles, weapons and prop-babes. The film stars new Superman Henry Cavill, Luke Evans, Mickey Rourke, Freida Pinto, Isabel Lucas, John Hurt, Kellan Lutz, Stephen Dorff and Joseph Morgan. It hits theaters in 3-D November 11.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Ving Rhames Will Lead David Gordon's Comedy Pilot "Black Jack"

    All you Ving Rhames fans have something good coming your way. He's set to play the lead character in a comedy pilot for Comedy Central network titled Black Jack. The project will be executive produced by David Gordon Green, director of Pineapple Express and George Washington among others.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    SFIFF 54 Day Five: Time Travel, from Cave of Forgotten Dreams to Children of the Princess of Cleves

    Meredith Brody reports on the latest festival screenings from San Francisco:The Frenchwoman who introduced Children of the Princess of Cleves gave us an invaluable bit of information that cast the film in an interesting light. President Nicolas Sarkozy said that reading the required “Princess of Cleves,” published in 1678, made no sense for a high school student who would be working as a cashier in two years. Many in France were incensed by the comment, big surprise -- as am I – wasn’t Sarkozy, despite a wealthy background, posited as “l’homme du people” when he ran for President? Here’s real-time news: when I Google Sarkozy, the news pops up that he and Carla Bruni are expecting their first child together – posted 13 minutes ago! I also learn that Sarkozy was a mediocre student, and had to go to a crammer to pass his baccalaureate, the exam that determines whether or not you can go on to college.

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  • Caryn James
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    New Will Ferrell Videos, Funny From Conan to Dave to The Office

    Will Ferrell gives an amazing, touching performance as a man whose life is falling apart in the indie drama Everything Must Go, (here's my review) but he's still one of the funniest guys around. In the past few weeks alone he has turned up on Conan, Letterman and The Office with hilariously different personalities.

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  • The Playlist
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    'NEDS' Director Peter Mullan Almost Helmed 'The Time Traveler's Wife' (Until He Botched The Pitch)

    Says 'NEDS' Is 40% Autobiographical & Talks About His Issues With Arthouse CinemaFrom bit parts in "Braveheart" and "Shallow Grave" to winning Best Actor at Cannes for Ken Loach's "My Name Is Joe," not to mention working with Steven Spielberg on the upcoming "War Horse" and securing the role of Death Eater Yaxley for the final two "Harry Potter" films, Scottish actor Peter Mullan has come a long way in a short time. Though he's well-known for his work as an actor, he's had a passion for filmmaking ever since he was 19. His first feature, "Orphans," made rounds at the Venice Film Festival and Paris Film Festival, but it was his sophomore project "The Magdalene Sisters" that really made a splash on the circuit, playing at the Toronto International Film Festival and garnering a nomination for a BAFTA Award. The drama, following three women in an asylum, was a large step forward for the filmmaker in terms of directorial style and substance; the festival-goers that caught it were impressed and eagerly awaited his follow-up.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Watch Now - "Make Believe," The Battle for World's Best Teen Magician

    In the feature-length documentary Make Believe, director J. Clay Tweel follows six adolescent outsiders who all share an extraordinary passion: the art of magic.

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    More: Watch Now