Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
Celebrating 17 Years of Film.Biz.Fans.

the Blogs

recent Posts

  • Shadow and Act
    0 comments

    Watch - An Introduction To African Cinema

    The word "Introduction" is key... while not an exhaustive history of African cinema, it's a decent start/introduction for the uninitiated. I just realized that I don't think I've watched a documentary that I'd say does a really thorough, comprehensive job of documenting the history of African cinema. However, if you know something I don't know, feel free to leave a comment.

    Read More »
    More: Watch Now
  • The Playlist
    0 comments

    Lars Von Trier Apologizes For Nazi Comments. Sort Of.

    Welcome back to the newly renamed Von TrierList, with the latest update from Cannes on the horrifying controversy the storm in a teacup that followed Lars Von Trier's comments at a press conference for his latest film about his 'Nazi' heritage, and the subsequent statement by festival officials announcing that the director was now "persona non grata" on the Croisette. The latest being that the director has responded to his 'ban.'

    Read More »
  • Shadow and Act
    0 comments

    A Week in Cannes Is Worth A Month in the Real World... But More Exhausting

    View from the press wifi cafe in the Palais des Festival

    Read More »
  • Shadow and Act
    0 comments

    If You Missed It...Listen To Last Night's S&A Podcast With Clifton Powell

    If you missed all the good talk last night, you can catch it here again...right now. The S&A crew talked about "A-List" celebrities and the Nina Simone production with Mary J. Blige. Tambay gave his interpretation of the Nina script.

    Read More »
    More: Podcast
  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
    0 comments

    RS 29—Surface Tensions: "L.I.E." and "Firstborn"

    Forget about the clumsy and poorly executed chase scenes, the hideous worst-of-the-eighties synth-rock soundtrack, and the clichéd ending in which the nuclear family stands triumphant and intact inside their suburban paradise (or cage)—Michael Apted’s now largely forgotten 1984 Paramount Pictures melodrama Firstborn is, above all, a conservative Reagan-era tale. The paranoia of previous decades about the infiltration of external forces into the social fabric now took place in the realm of the picket fence and driveway. It anticipates a cycle of movies in the early 1990s, such as John Schlesinger’s Pacific Heights or Curtis Hanson’s The Hand That Rocks the Cradle, which suggested that good Americans are never safe. It may be your nanny or your tenant, or, like in Firstborn, your mother’s new boyfriend, but someone will threaten the wholesomeness of the family one way or another. If in the 1970s and early 1980s it was time for America to heal its wounds with action and violence-driven products such as the Rambo and Death Wish series and, within the horror arena, the suburb was under siege by psychologically perverse creatures that came from the outside world to contaminate and menace it (The Last House on the Left, Halloween, or A Nightmare on Elm Street, to name just a few), in the 1990s any fellow American—male or female—could come in and shred the domestic paradise of the middle class to pieces.

    Read More »
    More: new issue
  • Shadow and Act
    0 comments

    Shonda Rhimes On Her New Series + Her "Pessimistic" Brand Of TV

    It doesn't have a lot of shiny, happy people. I don't know if that's a real hallmark. I'm always very sensitive to the fact that people somehow think the shows are light and airy or optimistic. I don’t feel like I've ever written anything light, airy, or optimistic, because I'm not that person. People always tell me they associate my shows with romance and funny stuff and happiness, and I always think, I just put a shooter in the hospital that blew someone's brain out."

    Read More »
    More: Television
  • Spout
    0 comments

    Posts About "Green Lantern"

    “Green Lantern” is a Lousy, Lazy Success

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    0 comments

    Bunk! 'The Wire' Star Wendell Pierce To Play Blues Legend B.B. King In New Biopic

    Patrick Fugit Joins Him In 'B.B. King And I'We suspect we've said this before, but, while we love basically every character on HBO's much-missed masterpiece "The Wire," our favorite may have been Detective William 'Bunk' Moreland, as embodied by Wendell Pierce, the warm beating heart of the show, but capable of regular badassery (watch the Season 3 confrontation with Omar, one of the great pieces of television acting by both Pierce and Michael K. Williams, for proof). Like many of the show's stars, the 49-year-old actor has gone on to bigger, if not better, things -- he's currently one of the key cast members in David Simon's 'Wire' follow-up "Treme," and before the year is out he'll crop up in both the comedy "Horrible Bosses" and in mega-franchise film "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Pt. 1." But it looks like he's finally landed a long overdue starring role.

    Read More »
  • Women and Hollywood
    0 comments

    Poster Watch: Sarah's Key starring Kristen Scott Thomas

    I loved this book and I cannot wait for the film. It opens here on July 22.

    Read More »
  • Spout
    0 comments

    The Ode of a Woody Allen Completist: 44 Films, 44 Quotes

    I am a Woody Allen completist, and successfully so. I have seen every last one of the director’s feature films, including those he wrote but didn’t direct. I’ve seen his 1994 TV version of “Don’t Drink the Water,” and I’ve tracked down the un-aired TV program “Men of Crisis: The Harvey Wallinger Story,” only available at the Paley Center for Media in both NYC and LA (and totally worth the trip). I’ve enjoyed each and every last moment of the experience, and I’d do it all again in a heartbeat. I haven’t yet seen “Midnight in Paris,” but I’ll be on it at the first available opportunity.

    Read More »