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  • The Playlist
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    James Wan & Leigh Whannell Get Moving On The Inevitable Sequel To Surprise Horror Hit 'Insidious'

    In a time where profitability for even the biggest movies is still a roll of the dice, there's one vein of gold than remains consistently reliable -- low-budget horror. You can make a picture for only a few million dollars, without stars, and even if it doesn't do great business (see something like "Apollo 18"), you'll still make a tidy return on your investment. And if it becomes a phenomenon, like "Paranormal Activity," then, well, it's time to order your platinum-covered limousine.

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  • SydneysBuzz
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    Festival Scope opens “Labels”

    Finally a way to track festival winners that eliminates our need to track all festivals separately. Festival Scope , the online platform known for providing film professionals with online screening of films from more than 60 of the most prestigious international film festivals (including Berlinale, Rotterdam, Locarno, Venice, Cannes' Directors' Fortnight and Critics' Week, Toronto and San Sebastian) has developed a new section called "Labels" and is aimed at providing additional visibility to the films awarded in festivals or selected by partner organizations.

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  • The Playlist
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    Watch: Video For Coldplay's 'Charlie Brown' Directed By 'Road To Guantanamo' Helmer Mat Whitecross

    Coldplay seem to be secret movie fans to some degree. Their new album Mylo Xyloto was apparently originally going to be the soundtrack to a movie they were writing, but never finished. And you might have forgotten, but last spring the band got into the film production game, co-finacing the film "Ashes" starring Jim Sturgess, Ray Winstone and Lesley Manville. That film has at the helm "Road To Guantanamo" co-director and Ian Dury biopic "Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll" helmer Mat Whitecross -- and he's been with with Chris Martin and the boys since day one. Whitecross was behind their first video "Bigger Stronger" and while the group have dabbled with other filmmakers over the years -- Anton Corbijn, Shynola, Grant Gee, Sophie Muller -- Mat has become a regular collaborator.

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  • The Playlist
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    Juno Temple Replaces Dakota Fanning As Princess Margaret In Royal Rom-Com 'Girls' Night Out'

    There were always going to be knock-on effects from the staggering success of "The King's Speech," and already we've seen Madonna's hamfisted attempt take on some of the same events in "W.E," while stammering Bertie and his Queen Elizabeth will be back on screens later this year, played by Sam West and Olivia Colman, opposite Bill Murray's President Roosevelt in "Hyde Park On Hudson." But there's one other film set around the same kind of time period on the way, a project that's just found a princess.

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  • Caryn James
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    Madonna's W.E.: Half Truth, Half Dare

    Madonna could not have had a more enthusiastic and welcoming audience for W.E. than I was when I walked into the screening room. I’m fascinated by the inexhaustible Wallis Simpson story. We may never understand the psycho-sexual-political drama that led Edward VIII to abdicate so he could marry his twice-divorced American honey, but we can be pretty sure neither one of them schemed to end up as the exiled Duke and Duchess of Windsor.

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  • The Playlist
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    'Bridget Jones' Baby' In Trouble? Working Title Says Script Still Being Worked On, But Hugh Grant Will Star

    You're probably asking yourself, "Who asked for a third "Bridget Jones" movie? I don't know anyone who saw the second!" Well, you're probably a filthy, dirty American. "Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason" overcame it's clunky title to gross $222 million outside of America, a whopping 85% of its global total. It's taken awhile for the wheels to begin turning on a third film, but "Bridget Jones' Baby" overcame scheduling setbacks and the defection of director Paul Feig ("Bridesmaids") to set a coming start date under Peter Cattaneo ("The Full Monty"). However, several people behind the scenes were whispering that the film would be shutdown entirely in the face of script problems.

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  • The Playlist
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    Review: 'Splinters' Is A Compelling Surfing Doc With More On Its Mind Than Just Hanging Ten

    By focusing on cultural barriers rather than killer waves, director Adam Pesce has created a compelling surfing documentary in “Splinters.” The film explores life in the remote Papua New Guinea island of Vanimo, where surfing is considered not just the most important of sports, but the only real means by which young men and women can get off the island and see the world. The film climaxes in Papua New Guinea’s first national surfing competition, the winner of which will get to compete against world-renowned surfers in Australia.

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  • Press Play
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    GREY MATTERS: WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN is disjointed and brilliant and baffling

    Nothing gets a horror fan more ticked off than a director with airs claiming her new film isn’t "really" horror but actually a character study exploring the deep psychological recesses of blah blah blah. In the case of "We Need to Talk About Kevin" director Lynne Ramsay, you’ve got a fancy Scot arthouse filmmaker ("Morvern Callar") big on New Wave affect who probably doesn’t think she’s making a horror movie. Lionel Shriver, author of the book the film is based upon, probably thought that, by mentioning horror movies frequently, she could escape the fact that she was blending multiple horror narratives to make one very good horror novel that wasn’t really just a genre effort.

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  • Press Play
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    OSCARS REVISITED, 1981: CHARIOTS OF FIRE

    As best-picture Oscar winners go, "Chariots of Fire" is both typical of the kind of Anglophile, prestige film the Academy favors and a rare, accurate biopic with an above-average script (indeed, it won the best screenplay Oscar as well). This inspirational 1981 film tells the true story of the track team Britain sent to the Paris Olympics in 1924. Tellingly, it concentrates on two runners who stand apart from the upper-crust Cambridge men who, for the filmʼs purposes, comprise a major chunk of the team. The first is Harold Abrahams (Ben Cross), a hard-driving law student at Cambridge who uses running, specifically, winning races, as a cudgel against anti-Semitism. The second is Eric Liddell (Ian Charleson), the son of a Scottish missionary who intends to follow in his fatherʼs footsteps, but has earned the nickname “The Flying Scotsman” for his prowess as a rugby player and sprinter.

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  • Press Play
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    VIDEO ESSAY: The Double Life of James and Juliette: Mysteries and Perceptions in Kiarostami's CERTIFIED COPY

    The newest film from Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami, "Certified Copy," is a complete and total enigma. Many films pose mysteries at their centers, including detective stories, thrillers with multiple twists, and now often art films that pose ambiguous endings. But "Certified Copy" emerges as something of a different order, because it challenges the spectator to explore the mystery yet never come to any particular solution. But by examining the clues Kiarostami gives us, we, the audience, can understand the philosophical ideas of what our answers may suggest.

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