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  • Shadow and Act
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    Watch "Duck" - A Short Film About A Boy Who's Afraid Of Being Touched

    Duck - directed by Jakob Daschek; part of a collection of 8 new shorts, produced by Ridley Scott, in a collaborative effort with USA Network, titled The Character Project.

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    More: Watch Now
  • Shadow and Act
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    Billy Dee Williams' "Hit!" - A Film In Possible Need Of A Remake

    When I saw the trailer a few days ago for Rob Lurie's "how-does-he-have-the-balls-to-remake-this?" new film remake of Sam Peckinpah's 1971 masterpiece Straw Dogs, I wondered why it never seems to occur to filmmakers that, if you absolutely just have to do remake of a film, instead of remaking a classic like Straw Dogs, why not concentrate your efforts instead on remaking a film which had an interesting premise but didn't live up to expectations?

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  • Women and Hollywood
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    Human Rights Watch Film Festival: The Women

    Women directors are dominant in the upcoming Human Rights Watch Film Festival in NYC from June 16-30.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Cannes: Sleeping Beauty Intros Director Leigh, Keeps Audience at Bay, Bought by Sundance Selects

    Cannes: Sleeping Beauty Intros Director Leigh, Keeps Audience at Bay, Bought by Sundance Selects

    Walking on the Croisette, I ran into Jane Campion, who was in town to support Australian novelist-turned-director Julia Leigh. Campion said that her "challenging" film Sleeping Beauty would never have gotten made if she hadn't agreed, when approached by Screen Australia, to "mentor" the project. Campion believes in this brainy writer-director, who came up with a fascinating way to confront moviegoers' comfort zone around female sexuality and prostitution.

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  • Caryn James
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    Join Me To Talk About Breakfast at Tiffany’s

    I’m happy to tell you that on Thursday The Picture House will launch a series of screenings and post-screening conversations called Women On Film, which I’ll be hosting. The Picture House is a beautiful 1921 theater in Pelham (Westchester) that has just reopened after a thorough renovation. The series about women on screen will focus on new, pre-release films, but we’re starting with the 50th anniversary screening of a classic: Breakfast at Tiffany’s, the movie that inspired countless women to move to Manhattan and launched the reign of the Little Black Dress.

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    More: Movie News
  • SydneysBuzz
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    The Girl From the Naked Eye

    Cannes - If you're look for action and intrigue, tragic romance, noir, The Girl From the Naked Eye is screening Monday May 16 here in Cannes at 1.30 pm or 13.30 H. In the Marche du Film / Market at Palais D screening room. All rights available.

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  • Eric Kohn
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    Cannes Clip: A Somber Kanye Plays a Great Set, Including a Stevie Wonder Cover.

    Eugene Hernandez provides a nice summary of last night's Kanye West show and the context behind it. Here are few clips I took from my vantage point at the front:

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  • The Playlist
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    Ramin Bahrani Casts Dennis Quaid and Zac Efron In New Project; Also, Pigs Can Apparently Fly Now

    Ramin Bahrani is pretty ace. The Iranian-American director broke through with 2005's terrific "Man Push Cart," and then followed it up swiftly with 2007's "Chop Shop" and 2008's "Goodbye Solo." There's not a bad film among them, all three humane, touching and cosmopolitan, and he's one of the most interesting young filmmakers around -- Roger Ebert even went as far as to call him the filmmaker of the decade in 2009. But strangely, we've not covered the director that much here at The Playlist: his last film hit theaters in 2008, and sadly new work, aside from the Werner Herzog-featuring short "Plastic Bag," hasn't really been forthcoming.

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  • The Playlist
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    Cannes Review: 'The Snow Of Kilimanjaro' Flirts With Big Ideas, But Lands On Easy Answers

    In Robert Guédiguian's "The Snows Of Kilimanjaro" shot in the beautiful town of Esthaqe deeper problems are roiling underneath the sunkissed sky. After thirty years, Michel (Jean-Pierre Daroussin), along with a number of other workers, has lost his job on the docks where he was one of the toppers. Essentially forced into early retirement, Michel mostly keeps a strong front, spending more time with his grandchildren and tackling projects he's always said he was going to do but never did. But he's also got his lovely wife Marie-Claire (Ariane Ascardie) at his side, and as it turns out, they've got an anniversary coming up. Gathering all their friends together -- including some of Michel's former coworkers, some of whom were also laid off -- they celebrate and are surprised with a gift of money and tickets from everyone for an African Safari. Despite the brief bump in the road, life seems very, very good.

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  • The Playlist
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    Cannes Review: 'The Artist' A Joyous, Big Hearted Tribute To Old School Moviemaking

    When The Weinstein Company announced last week just before the kick off the Cannes Film Festival that they had picked up Michel Hazanavicius' "The Artist" it was certainly a surprise. Harvey and Bob laid down big bucks for a film that, in this age of CGI and 3D blockbuster pictures, seems like box office poison. A silent film, in black and white, led by two French stars that are virtually unknown in the United States, it doesn't seem like the kind of movie that, outside of arthouse buffs, would catch on with a broader audience. But, the Weinstein instincts were right on as screening this morning for critics, not only did "The Artist" play like gangbusters to critics who applauded the film at various points during the film but more importantly, Hazanavicius' film is a pure joy. Wildly entertaining, with a big generous heart, "The Artist" is not just an exercise in old school filmmaking, it's a beautifully told story that is classic and timeless in feel.

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