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  • The Playlist
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    Jonathan Levine Says He Hopes His Zombie Movie 'Warm Bodies' Will Be "Visually Arresting"

    With "50/50" pulling in pretty positive reactions from most critics (although you'll recall that we were a little cooler on it than most), it looks like director Jonathan Levine is finally heading toward the big time, after a false start when his debut "All The Boys Love Mandy Lane" was lost to legal distribution hell.

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  • The Playlist
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    Lynne Ramsay Talks Her Version Of 'The Lovely Bones,' Tilda Swinton Says More Adventures Are Coming

    Five Things We Learned From The Director & Star Of 'We Need To Talk About Kevin'Even if no other films had been released, 2011 would be a pretty good year for the movies purely by virtue of marking the return of Scottish director Lynne Ramsay, whose first and second features "Ratcatcher" and "Morvern Callar" marked the birth of a very special talent, but has spent the best part of a decade struggling to get films financed, particularly after spending some time trying to get an adaptation of Alice Sebold's "The Lovely Bones" made, before being pushed off the film when Peter Jackson showed interest.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Urbanworld 2011 Review - Andrew Dosunmu's Enchanting "Restless City"

    I challenge any film lover to watch Andrew Dosunmu's stylized feature-film debut, Restless City, and not be captivated by Bradford Young's hypnotic cinematography. Even the filmmaker himself has repeatedly tipped his hat to Young's efforts (he also shot Pariah by the way), helping (along with Dosunmu's laconic script) to turn what might otherwise have been a routine new-gen immigrant tale into much more compelling viewing.

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  • The Playlist
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    Review: Gus Van Sant's 'Restless' A Sappy Misfire From A Director Capable Of So Much More

    Gus Van Sant has long been fascinated by young people – the way they interact with each other, the way they move, the way they emote, and, most importantly, the way they die (or at the very least face their mortality head-on – you could even lump his interesting, if aimless, "Psycho" remake in there). But he's never dared to make a movie as self-indulgent, pointless, mushy, and boring as "Restless," one that borrows heavily from movies much better than it ("Harold & Maude," "Love Story," "An American Werewolf in London," countless French New Wave flicks), and fails to leave even the slightest impression, beyond the thought of never, ever, ever wanting to see it again.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    DiCaprio and Eastwood Talk J. Edgar in GQ Cover Story

    In the latest issue of GQ, the magazine pairs the actor and director combo from biopic J. Edgar, in which Leonardo DiCaprio suits up as the famed and defamed former head of the FBI under Clint Eastwood's direction. The film will kick off this year's AFI Film FEST on November 3 before opening wide November 11.

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  • The Playlist
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    TIFF '11 Review: 'The Deep Blue Sea' A Beautiful, Woozy & Heartbreaking Tale Of Intense Passion

    "Beware of passion Hester, it always leads to something ugly."

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  • Spout
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    TIFF11: "Albert Nobbs" Is a Counterpoint of Strong Performances, If Not Much Else

    “We are both disguised as ourselves,” quips the boisterous and charismatic Dr. Holloran (Brendan Gleeson) to Albert Nobbs (Glenn Close) at a costume party, to which they have both come without fancy dress. Of course, this is for entirely different reasons: the good doctor seems to have no patience for this sort of high class frivolity, while Nobbs is working. The hotel may be throwing a costume party, but its employees must remain in their drab uniforms for the duration. This little hint of a deeper problem of class and with Holloran’s unsuspectingly astute observation about secrecy make up the thematic ambiguities that give “Albert Nobbs” an abundance of both heart and wit.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    How Butter Used Bachmann, Highest-Paid Man in Entertainment, How NBC Snagged the Jackie O Tapes

    In an effort to promote the political satire Butter, whose reviews in Telluride and Toronto were less than stellar, the film's distributor Harvey Weinstein has raised the movie's political references to Michelle Bachmann in order to make a "blatant effort to make [Butter] into something people will be talking about," he wrote in a statement formally inviting the Republican politician to co-host the premiere of the film in Iowa in a few months. Weinstein asked one of the film's actresses, Olivia Wilde, to read the missive:In 20 years of coming to the Toronto Film Festival, I've never released a statement for a film. But I would like to take this moment to formally invite Republican congresswoman from Minnesota and Republican presidential candidate Michele Bachmann to co-host with me the big premiere of 'Butter' in Iowa in a few months from now.

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  • The Playlist
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    Ryan Gosling Likens 'Drive' To John Hughes, Super Hero Films & Brothers Grimm Fairy Tales

    Actor Talks The Process of Putting A Different Identity On What Was Once A Big-Budgeted Action FlickThis Friday is a big one for cinema fans internationally, as it sees the wider premier of two films that (hopefully!) will be vying for some serious recognition this coming awards season. And while it’s the U.K. audiences who will be basking in the glow of spy thriller “Tinker Tailor Solider Spy,” we here in the States can finally cash in those long held Fandango reservations to experience neo-noir/fairy tale/ode to Los Angeles “Drive,” a film that critics -- ourselves amongst them -- have been having a meltdown over since it premiered at Cannes last May. But for as cool and measured as the final product looks on screen, the process of adapting the James Sallis novel was a lengthy one. We recently had the chance to speak with producer and star Ryan Gosling about the film and how he, working with director Nicholas Winding Refn and screenwriter Hossein Amini took a once big budget Hugh Jackman vehicle (yes, really) and developed it into a romantic look at heroes, Los Angeles and in many ways, moviemaking.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Andrea Arnold's "Wuthering Heights" Acquired For North American 2012 Release

    When it rains it pours... first Shame, then Yelling To The Sky, and now, Wuthering Heights... from The Hollywood Reporter:

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