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  • Matt Dentler's Blog
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    Golf Digesting with Tiger and Barack

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Sundance Adds iPhone App

    Sundance Adds iPhone App

    This was the year film fests discovered iPhone apps; Seattle had one (pictured) and now Sundance has one too. It's featured at Apple’s iTunes site and App Store. The app delivers real-time info to attendees:Users are able to search films and events, watch videos and trailers, interact with Twitter and Facebook, upload photos, find venues using location-based services and maps and much more. Sundance Institute will update the schedule, add content and add new events in real-time. Fans will access the Sundance Film Festival film guide and schedule, read about special panels and events, access top stories, meet the participating artists, search films, and watch videos. It is available online now for $4.99.

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  • The Lost Boys
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    Goodbye Mo-Mo!?

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    More: Annoyances
  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Trailer Watch: District 13: Ultimatum Goes Parkour

    In this sequel to District 13, police officer Damien Tomasso (Cyril Raffaell) reteams with ex-vigilante Leito (parkour master David Belle) to protect D13 from a group of corrupt officials looking to raze and redevelop the deteriorating area. Check out the hi-def trailer.

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    More: Video, Trailers
  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Bob Dylan Sings Christmas in the Heart

    I like Bob Dylan's straight-ahead approach to holiday classics on his new album, Christmas in the Heart. Here's a Yahoo review, complete with recommendation for another Dylan approach to Christmas music:

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    More: Video
  • THE BACK ROW MANIFESTO by Tom Hall
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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    Best of the Decade #9

    It’s almost astonishing now to think of the teakettle tempest that erupted when Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne were awarded the Palme d’Or for their Rosetta by David Cronenberg’s Cannes jury in 1999. That such a seemingly modest slice of peculiarly assertive social realism could triumph in a field almost exclusively reserved for art-house white elephants or Hollywood fare inflated by critical fawning was, at the very least, highly unlikely. Yet Cronenberg and company’s verdict was not simply a career-making coup for the brothers, but a rather bold recognition of those spaces going unfilled in contemporary cinema. Against the turf-staking instincts of so many of even the best filmmakers, the Dardennes had created a supple aesthetic that was wholly theirs while being eminently sharable. Their combination of formalist rigor, documentary immediacy, and social concern, if masterful, was far from novel; but the uniqueness of their work lay in something less quantifiable and categorizable. There is a pulsing life in the films that goes beyond their bobbing, neck-breathing camera, an inexorable pull towards the metaphysical while never departing from the most concrete of settings and situations. Read Andrew Tracy on The Son.

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  • iW NOW
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    St. Louis Goes "Up In The Air"

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  • iW NOW
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    Phoenix Likes "Basterds"

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  • iW NOW
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