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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    Best of the Decade #16

    Olivier Assayas’s Summer Hours begins in the country home of the Berthier family’s elegant matriarch, Hélène (Edith Scob). Her three children and many grandchildren have come to celebrate her 75th birthday and the publication of a book about her renowned artist uncle and possible one-time lover, Paul Berthier. Serving as a monument to Paul’s work and vast collection of objets d’art, as well as the only real gathering place for Hélène’s far-flung family, the house is filled with beautiful, well worn things that are cherished upon reflection yet taken for granted on a day-to-day basis. Sitting in the garden and looking through the book, the family members see a photograph of an older generation of Berthiers sitting exactly as they are now, reminding everyone how much this place links them to their past.

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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    Flaherty NYC: Witness

    Flaherty NYC: WITNESSDecember 14 , 7:30pm, Anthology Film Archives

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    More: Repertory
  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    Smoke and Mirrors: Tom Ford's "A Single Man"

    Sometimes in movies a heartbroken love story can come together with one exquisite detail: a woman’s hand slowly being loosened from a lacey glove in Scorsese’s The Age of Innocence; a head resting on a shoulder in In the Mood for Love. Any film that hopes to map the sinuous contours of a past romance can be helped along by one of these smoldering moments, in which love is a delicate rare bird and reality splits off into an instant memory of itself. In Tom Ford’s A Single Man—which, like my previous examples, is a painstakingly aestheticized period piece that situates eros within a persistent longing for lost time—this scene arrives early. George (Colin Firth), a middle-aged British expatriate teaching at a small Southern Californian college in the 1960s, receives a phone call in his living room on a leisurely night alone. It becomes clear that the call is about Jim (Matthew Goode), his lover of sixteen years who, in the film’s opening dream sequence, is seen lying dead in a snowy landscape after a car crash. George’s response to the bad news is disarmingly elegant: while clearly flustered, he also maintains the steadiness of his voice so as not to impose his distress on the deliverer of the message. We grow curious to see how much pain will crack through Firth’s stereotypical poker-faced Englishness. Then, as if on cue, a sliver of water moistens the bottom of each eye. Only when the phone has returned to its cradle do two perfectly round tears come traveling down George’s otherwise minimally expressive face.

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  • Leonard Maltin
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    Disney Museum Kickoff

    There is an extended Disney family that includes veteran animators and artists, Imagineers, contemporary filmmakers, fans, and enthusiasts. Many of them were on hand for the gala opening of the Walt Disney Family Museum on September 29, and I snapped as many as I could. (Photography is not allowed inside the Museum galleries.)

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    More: Journal
  • THE BACK ROW MANIFESTO by Tom Hall
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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Avatar: Cameron Delivers Joyous Cinema

    Avatar: Cameron Delivers Joyous Cinema

    James Cameron's Avatar takes you to an exotic world, Pandora, seen through the sad eyes of paraplegic marine Jake Sully (Sam Worthington) as he falls in love with tribal princess Neyteri (Zoe Saldana) and her people, the Na'vi.

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  • eugonline
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    decade daily: A

    Today, the letter 'A'.

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  • Leonard Maltin
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    Skin

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  • Leonard Maltin
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  • Leonard Maltin
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