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  • Shadow and Act
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    7 Pics Of Sanaa Lathan In Action On "Vera Stark" Stage

    Currently in previews at New York's Second Stage Theater, Sanaa Lathan starring in Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, Lynn Nottage's new play, By The Way, Meet Vera Stark, as a black maid in Hollywood pursuing her dream of making it in the movies, while also grappling with racial stereotypes through several decades of the 20th century.

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    More: Pics, Theater
  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Unite for Japan: Stars Ask for Donations for Post-Tsunami Relief

    As I watched this video, I realized how upset I am about what happened in Japan. Ken Watanabe organized this plea for help, aided by Johnny Depp, Jamie Lee Curtis, Ben Stiller, John Legend, Jonah Hill, Paula Abdul, Ben Affleck and many others. The PSA launched today. Unite for Japan.

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  • The Playlist
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    U.K. Release For Terrence Malick's 'The Tree Of Life' Is Completely Up In The Air

    While the wait for Terrence Malick's "The Tree Of Life" has literally been years (it was originally planned for a December 2009 release) it looks like our friends in the U.K. may be waiting longer than most to see the film. As you might recall, Icon Film Distribution made major waves last month when they announced -- and confirmed to various outlets -- that they would be releasing "The Tree Of Life" in the U.K. on May 4th, well in advance of it's planned Cannes Film Festival premiere. Despite their assertions, many wondered how long their claim would stick and there was a whole new twist to the tale when a couple of days later, sales agent for the film Summit International announced that Icon actually didn't have the rights to the movie and they were in breach of their agreement. All remained silent since and while it's been pretty much assumed Icon would back down, they finally officially have.

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  • Jared Moshé's Blog
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    Fortissimo takes International Rights to CORMAN'S WORLD

    Fortissimo takes International Rights to CORMAN'S WORLD

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Playbill Gives Jersey Shore the Oscar Wilde Treatment

    Playbill has made Jersey Shore high brow. Check out the hilarious first and second videos in their series, in which transcripts from the reality show are done in the style of Oscar Wilde, through the characters of his play, The Importance of Being Ernest (as performed by Santino Fontana and David Furr).

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  • The Playlist
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    Josh Schwartz & Jamie Moss Lose Out On Screenwriting Credits For 'X-Men: First Class'

    Sheldon Turner Of 'Up In The Air' Gets A "Story-By" Credit For His 'Magneto' Script Elements That Were UsedHow many screenwriters does it take to write an "X-Men" film? Or alternate lede: Screenplay credits are a tricky matter. Just ask "Up In The Air" screenwriter Sheldon Turner. He wrote the original draft of the Jason Reitman film, but things turned semi-ugly during the 2009 Oscar campaign when Reitman essentially said -- perhaps in not so many words, but close -- that he had never read Turner's draft and had adapted the screenplay on his own from Walter Kirn's novel. Still, Turner received his screen credit. And the duo awkwardly took the stage when they won the Golden Globe for Best Screenplay as the controversy was just beginning to brew and as as their dispute grew and made headlines for Oscar bloggers, they were rewarded during the awards show with nothing; Geoffrey Fletcher's "Precious" screenplay won the adapted screenplay prize, as Academy voters backlashed against the dispute, despite the fact that the "Up In The Air" screenplay was long assumed to be the frontrunner for that bauble. Oh well.

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  • The Playlist
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    German Actress Antje Traue (Who?) To Play Villainess Faora In 'Man Of Steel'

    Update: Variety confirms that Traue will be playing Faora, a villainess ripped right from the comics in the film.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Prom Early Reviews: Formulaic Tween Fantasy Flick or Stereotype Reinforcer?

    Prom Early Reviews: Formulaic Tween Fantasy Flick or Stereotype Reinforcer?

    Disney's Prom opens April 29. It stars Aimee Teegarden, Thomas McDonell, DeVaugh Nixon, Danielle Campbell, Yin Chang, Nolan Sotillo, and more. Joe Nussbaum directs a script from Katie Wech. Reviews, picture and the trailer are below.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Watch Now - Zoe Kravitz in X-Men: First Class

    In a recent interview with MTV, Zoe Kravitz describes her audition for the role of Angel Salvadore in the forthcoming X-Men: First Class. She also discusses how they brought her character's insect-like ability to life, and the scene from the film's trailer that introduced her live-action role to fans.

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    More: Watch Now
  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    Vital Signs: Clio Barnard's "The Arbor"

    If it were not for the playwright Andrea Dunbar—whose artistic career lasted from when she was 15 (she wrote her first play The Arbor for a school project, later picked up by London’s Royal Court Theatre) to her death at 29 when she suffered a brain hemorrhage and died on the floor of her local pub—then the Buttershaw Estate, a housing project on the outskirts of Bradford, West Yorkshire, would merely be an unremarkable vestige of Thatcher’s Britain. There are hundreds like it scattered across northern industrial towns since the decline of Britain’s mining, manufacturing and textile industries. Instead, thanks to Dunbar’s plays (in particular the ribald comedy Rita, Sue and Bob Too, filmed in 1986 by Allan Clarke) the estate which was her home and is also the backdrop to Clio Barnard’s film of Dunbar’s life, The Arbor, has become a vivid living landscape in its own right—one that compels the viewer to look beyond the dingy brickwork and overgrown grass, and discover bit by bit the nature and extent of the bubbling human turmoil within its ramshackle walls. The lives of the inhabitants of the Buttershaw Estate feature throughout Dunbar’s plays, yet none of the injustice of their disenfranchised lives is decried and nor are any solutions proposed—the value of her work is to persuade the audience to venture inside a place their every instinct would ordinarily compel them to pass by, and to listen to voices they would otherwise ignore. Read all of Julien Allen's review of The Arbor.

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