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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    NYFF: Tuesday, After Christmas

    None of Romanian filmmaker Radu Muntean’s films have yet seen commercial release in the U.S., but he’s one of his country’s most accomplished realists. His second feature, The Paper Will Be Blue, was a here-and-now recent-history drama in the Paul Greengrass mold, though less oppressively hectic, a topsy-turvy handheld portrait of collective confusion during the December 22, 1989, fall of president Nicolae Ceausescu. Life under Ceausescu—himself the subject of a caustic state-pageantry archival-footage “autobiography” playing outside the 2010 New York Film Festival’s main slate—has been a dominant topic of films from the so-called Romanian New Wave, whether tackled head-on (4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days) or as memory (12:08 East of Bucharest). Many recent films from Romania display a mordant sense of humor, but they are almost uniformly bleak, even the ones set in the present day (Stuff and Dough; Police, Adjective; and The Death of Mr. Lazarescu), showing a country still in institutional and infrastructural disrepair, and therefore implicitly pointing an incriminating finger backward at the dictator.

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  • Matt Dentler's Blog
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    Prohibition

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  • The Lost Boys
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    indieWIRE Gets a Makeover

    Check it out.

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  • The Playlist
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    George Lucas Doesn't Have Enough Money: Milking Star Wars Dry With 3D Re-Releases Starting In 2012

    George Lucas is worth, roughly, $3 billion. Between the takings of the original trilogy, and its 1997 re-release, the three prequels, the TV-spin offs, the video games, the novels, the comic books, the toys, the lunchboxes and the pillowcases, it's fair to say he has a steady income coming in. So luckily, Lucas is able to sit back on focus on that groundbreaking indie cinema he's been talking up for thirty years, his real passion projects, right?

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  • Leonard Maltin
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    The Voice Of Hollywood Is Stilled

    Art loaned me this sweet photo of him with protean radio actress Lurene Tuttle taken in the late 1930s outside of CBS in Hollywood.

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    More: Journal
  • THE BACK ROW MANIFESTO by Tom Hall
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    The 2010 New York Film Festival | AURORA

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Del Toro Talks Hobbit, Mountains of Madness, Don't Be Afraid of the Dark, Julia's Eyes, Biutiful

    When Guillermo del Toro left New Zealand after two years prepping Peter Jackson's The Hobbit, he was escaping from a box (MGM's financial issues had frozen the project), but he also didn't know what he was going to do next. Since then, the director/producer has been making up for lost time, making deals all over town: Disney, where he's doing Haunted Mansion, and which is releasing his Miramax horror production Don't Be Afraid of the Dark; DreamWorks Animation; and Fox, where he's excited about returning to big-budget directing with James Cameron's Mountains of Madness. Del Toro talks about his productions Julia's Eyes and Biutiful, which played in Toronto, as well as his other projects, in three flip cam interviews posted below, along with the Julia's Eyes trailer.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    MacArthur Genius Grant to Simon, McKellan Fights for Brit Acting Stature

    - The MacArthur Foundation's annual list of scientists, scholars, musicians and artists to receive $500,000 "genius" grants includes David Simon, the co-creator/writer/producer behind The Wire, Treme, Homicide: Life on the Streets [pictured with The Wire star Dominic West]. The Foundation says Simon's latest work on Treme explores "the constraints that poverty, corruption and broken social systems place on the lives of a compelling cast of characters, each vividly realized with complicated motives, frailties, and strengths." Among the other ten women twelve men who received the grant is jazz pianist Jason Moran, theater director David Cromer, marble sculptor Elizabeth Turk and fiction writer Yiyun Li.

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  • Enzian Theater
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    Cinematic Bonanza in O'town This Week!

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    More: General
  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Embracing Claustrophobic Movies

    Riffing off such recent movies in tight spaces as Buried and Devil (which are struggling at the b.o.) and Danny Boyle's upcoming 127 Hours, Vulture posts their list of the eleven most claustrophobic films. They note: "Confining your film to a single space certainly has its advantages: a lower budget, obviously, but also an instantly suspenseful premise."

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