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  • The Playlist
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    IFFBoston Review: 'Terri' Follows An Odd Budding Bromance

    Azazel Jacobs has built a career on slow-moving portraits of everyday life. He first came to the indie scene’s attention with “Momma’s Man,” a film that wowed Sundance audiences in 2008. This year he’s back with a much more refined film called “Terri,” about an overweight, teenage outcast who finds friendship with the school principal.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Watch "Learning Uncle Vernon" - The Short Film That Common's "L.U.V." Drama Feature Is Based On

    I just happened across this short film by director Sheldon Candis - a name we've mentioned at least twice on this site in the last 2 weeks, thanks to the fact that he's currently in production on his feature film debut titled L.U.V. (an acronym that stands for Learning Uncle Vincent), which centers on a day in the life of William “Woody” Watson (played by newcomer Michael Rainey Jr), a shy and timid 13-year old in search of a family and a better life, who looks to his Uncle Vincent, an ex-con, played by Common, hoping to find the father figure he’s never had, and has always wanted.

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    More: Watch Now
  • The Playlist
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    Why On Earth Is Take That Going To Be On The Soundtrack For 'X-Men: First Class'?

    Sorry, Matthew Vaughn. We think you're great but dude, you have shit taste in music. While in pretty much every other department "X-Men: First Class" is looking like the classiest comic joint of the summer, that's all about to be gummed up by what is sure to be one of the oddest closing songs of a period set movie ever.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    The Freedom Riders Rode Today... Their Story Told In New PBS Documentary + Oprah's Tribute

    Today in history, May 4th, 1961, the Civil Rights movement... despite facing violence, a diverse group of young adults, aka Freedom Riders, leaves Washington DC for New Orleans to challenge racial segregation on interstate buses and at bus terminals.

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  • Women and Hollywood
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    Los Angeles Film Festival 2011 Selections: The Women

    The LA Film Festival will run from June 16 to June 26. They received over 5,000 submissions for their competition program. All the films in competition are either world, North American, or US premieres. According to the press release the number of female filmmakers increased to 23.The Narrative Competition - Out of 10 films, 3 are directed by women. That's 30 %The Bad Intentions, Rosario Garcia-Montero – Argentina/Germany/Peru – US PREMIEREThe Fatherless, Marie Kreutzer – Austria – NORTH AMERICAN PREMIEREHow to Cheat, Amber Sealey – WORLD PREMIERE

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  • The Playlist
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    Rachel Weisz Gets Witchy With 'Oz The Great And Powerful'

    While it was recently reported that Sam Raimi and Disney were fighting over a key female role in "Oz The Great And Powerful" -- the director wanted Hilary Swank, but the studio was looking at Michelle Williams -- another actress entirely has snagged the part.

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  • The Playlist
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    Clive Owen & Anil Kapoor Attached To Roger Donaldson's Financial Thriller 'Cities'

    Nearly three years after the fact, filmmakers are finally catching up to the giant bastards behind the collapse of the economy at the end of 2008 that dumped the rest of us in the shit. Last year saw both Oliver Stone's mediocre "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps," and Charles Ferguson's Oscar-winning documentary "Inside Job," which both looked at the events that led to the crash, while 2011 has already seen "Margin Call" pick up good notices at Sundance, and Curtis Hanson's all-star "Too Big To Fail" airs on HBO in a few weeks.

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  • Caryn James
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    Review, Something Borrowed: Ginnfer Goodwin, Kate Hudson Fight Over a Ken Doll

    “The Hamptons are like a zombie movie directed by Ralph Lauren.” Enjoy that line, because it’s about the only one that might make you laugh in the irredeemably lame romcom Something Borrowed. From the minute you see Ginnifer Goodwin wearing an unconvincing long brown wig, you have an inkling of just how false this by-the-numbers film is going to be.

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  • Peter Bogdanovich
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    O RARE ERNST LUBITSCH

    I feel sorry for people who have never seen an Ernst Lubitsch movie; they are missing such delights. There is no way to really describe what exactly it is that makes most of his pictures so charming, funny, human, stylized, unique. During the time of his world-wide popularity (ca. 1924 till after his death in 1947), people called it “The Lubitsch Touch,” which proved that everyone could feel it, but no one could adequately define it. Over the years, I’ve tried to explain why I love Lubitsch so much and what it is that makes him so ultra-special, in a place all by himself. There’s never been anyone like Ernst Lubitsch, though many filmmakers have tried, they never came close. In Esquire, back in the early '70s, I did a monthly column and devoted one entirely to Lubitsch, which was reprinted in my collection, Pieces of Time (1973/1985); and for my directors’ interview book, Who the Devil Made It (1997), I expanded this into a section of the Introduction called “The Director I Never Met”---but most wanted to! And finally, in 2008 I tried again in a long piece for Peter Kaplan’s The New York Observer, the title of which states the point succinctly: “The Importance of Seeing Ernst”. I still think it’s of the utmost importance; if more people were enjoying Lubitsch movies, they would be happier, more hopeful. Here’s the link to the article on their website if you want to read about why pictures like Trouble in Paradise, The Smiling Lieutenant, The Shop Around the Corner, The Love Parade, The Merry Widow, Cluny Brown, and Heaven Can Wait, among others, are among my favorites, and as good as the medium can offer: treasures waiting to be found.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    2011 Tony Awards Nominations Announced! "Scottsboro Boys" Racks Up 12! The Details...

    As I wrote yesterday, star of stage and screen, Anika Noni Rose, joined Matthew Broderick this morning in announcing the nominees for the 2011 Tony Awards (essentially the stage equivalent of the Oscars - theater's highest honor), and as I suggested then, this year's list of potentials has a decent representation of African American talent, some who just might actually walk away with some hardware when the awards ceremony is held on Sunday June 12th, broadcast live, beginning at 8/7c on CBS.

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