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  • The Playlist
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    New Look At 'Thor,' Yep He's Still Got A Hammer

    So, a new look at "Thor" has hit the web from pages of the latest Entertainment Weekly (via ComingSoon) and well, unlike the first look of "Spider-Man" which had nerds zooming in on various parts of the pic, this one won't create the same fervor. It's, well, Thor. He's got a hammer, he's hanging out in his Dad's church organ rockin' his long hair and beard. Woo.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    Canadian Pastoral: Richard J. Lewis's "Barney's Version"

    Barney Panofsky, the protagonist of Barney’s Version, is, in a word, incorrigible. A derailed-wedding-party scene near the beginning of this adaptation of the late Québécois novelist Mordecai Richler’s last novel, written by Michael Konyves and directed by TV veteran Richard J. Lewis, hammers this fact home most forcefully. Getting sloppily drunk in the midst of his increasingly disapproving new in-laws, Barney (Paul Giamatti, in Duplicity hair-trigger-temper mode throughout) spends the reception for his second wedding, to a well-to-do harpy (Minnie Driver), trying to avoid the obligatory chair-hoisting festivities so he can follow the progress of a pivotal hockey game. (Barney’s hockey fandom is one of a handful of persistent reminders that this film takes place in Montreal.) He finishes the night by pursuing a mysterious guest at the wedding (Rosamund Pike) all the way to her departing train, where she impresses him further by offering coolly practical demurrals to his professions of love at first sight while casually putting down her mass-market paperback copy of Saul Bellow’s Herzog—also presumably reaffirming the literary territory Lewis and Konyves intend to cover, as Richler himself is often grouped with American titans Philip Roth and Bellow as a chronicler of irrepressible Jewish masculinity. It should be added that during this entire sequence Barney has on his person the pistol that his retired-cop father, Izzy Panofsky (Dustin Hoffman), has given him as a wedding present.

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  • The Playlist
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    Watch: Trailer For Gregg Araki's Trippy 'Kaboom'

    When we saw Gregg Araki's "Kaboom" at TIFF we said that it was like "Saved By The Bell" meets "Lost Highway" on ecstasy. Sounds fucking great, right? Well, not really.

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  • The Lost Boys
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    Last Minute Critics Choice Award Predictions

    I might as well. These are going down tonight and look to be mighty predictable... But here's hoping the BFCA throws a wrench in something and makes things a little interesting:

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    LA Film Critics Award-Winner Mazursky Talks Career, Kubrick, Tempest, Hollywood

    LA Film Critics Award-Winner Mazursky Talks Career, Kubrick, Tempest, Hollywood

    Paul Mazursky, 80, has always been a one-of-a-kind Hollywood filmmaker. He started out as an actor, wrote (often with a partner), directed and produced his films, and he hasn't stopped. He directed a 2006 documentary about a meeting of Hassidic Jews in the Ukraine (Yippee), directs theater and is prepping a Broadway musical version of Moon Over Parador. The director flourished inside the studio system during the 70s and 80s, a time when execs allowed all sorts of things to happen that they wouldn't today. Movies didn't cost as much. A single exec actually in charge of production could greenlight a movie. We talk about this in the flip cam interview below, as well as starting off his film acting career in 1953 on Stanley Kubrick's first film, Fear and Desire, Mazursky and Julie Taymor's different takes on Shakespeare's The Tempest, and what's wrong with Hollywood today, where it's hard to imagine any studio head greenlighting a film about an old man and his cat.

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  • The Lost Boys
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    Golden Guadagnino: Luca Reflects On "Love" In Midst of Awards Season

    It's been sixteen months since the film world first laid eyes on Luca Guadagnino's "I Am Love." Quietly premiering at the Venice Film Festival, the Italian language film would go on to exceed all expectations, becoming a significant critical and financial success story in the United States. It's now heading into one of the biggest non-Oscar award weekends of the year, with foreign language film nominations at both the Critics Choice Awards and the Golden Globes.

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  • The Playlist
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    The Leftover Question Marks Of 2011 - Can These Films Possibly Be Any Good? Part 1

    The Answer Is Probably Not, But Hey, What The Hell...Our exhausting coverage of the films coming out in 2011 continues and yes, we're tired, hungry and a bit cranky. We used to call this our Least Anticipated Films feature, but this year our New Year's resolution was to be a tiny bit more positive. Frankly, the sentiment applies, but this is also the leftover films of 2011 we just don't know what to do with. Many of them look abysmal, some of us glass-half-full Playlist types (yes, there are a few among us) think, "hey, that picture might not be so bad," while other members of the group stare in shock that such an idea could be possibly floated. So yes, basically these are the films that we don't hold out too much hope, the ones we think look downright cheap and dreadful, made only to turn a buck and the occasional few that look half-decent (and may just not have fit in the character count of our Escapist Features, sue us) --- though before you bombard our comments section, please actually read what we have to say about these films before assuming we're completely writing them off. Also, while it wasn't intentional, some of us do find it amusing that most of the cast of "Twilight" fill these halls. Another trend we just realized? Leighton Meester pretty much means box-office poison (poor cute, "Gossip Girl"). Also, Hollywood seems to be banking on the mostly unknown Alex Pettyfer, but he truly looks like a charisma-free zone of blandness. Onwards to 2011, though, not necessarily upwards in this case....

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  • Caryn James
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    TV Review. "Big Love" and Mormons, Mormons Everywhere

    As Big Love begins its final season (Sunday on HBO) we can see the influence of this series about a polygamist and his three wives all over the culture. In recent months alone we’ve had Brady Udall’s rich, grabbing literary novel The Lonely Polygamist and the reality series Sister Wives on TLC. The pattern is clear: not mainstream Mormons, but breakaway polygamists, feeding our voyeuristic interest in multiple marriage.

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  • The Playlist
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    'Submarine' Helmer Richard Ayoade’s Next Pic May Be Blacklist Script, 'Apostles Of Infinite Love'

    Ben Stiller's Red Hour Films ProducingUpdate: This project will no longer be known as "Apostles Of Infinite Love" and will be developed as "The Untitled Victoria Strouse Project" for now.

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