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  • Eric Kohn
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    Talking 3-D.

    Talking 3-D.

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  • The Playlist
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    Criterion Clue: Brian DePalma's 'Blow Out' Coming To The Collection?

    The Evidence Is Too Great, Don't Bet Against ItSure, any and all speculation about what the Criterion "wacky" clues really mean are going to be aimless and hypothetical (and, as such, have just as likely a probability of being way off-base and wrong), but there are a few from the past that have called to us with their obviousness: the parrot that wore the "Che" T-shirt, for instance; the golden scarab from "Cronos" or the thin red lion standing in for Terrence Malick's "Thin Red Line."

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  • The Playlist
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    Chris Morris, Director Of 'Four Lions' Talks The Truth About Absolute Evil, "The Lion King"

    It's rare when a debut film is anything but amateur, few nail a "Blood Simple" or "400 Blows" at first swing. Even those that are mediocre "show promise," and those that reveal a sign of brashness are "future cult classics." So how is it that British satirist Chris Morris' first film "Four Lions," a comedy following a Jihadist cell, is not only hilarious and ballsy, but works really well? Truth be told, it could be his years of experience in the biz -- starting off as a disc jockey, he worked on many radio shows and later in television, including "The IT crowd" and "The Day Today," which featured a very young Steve Coogan. It wasn't until 2002 that he approached film-making, directing the short "My Wrongs #8245-8249 & 117" based off of a comedy monologue he had included in a previous show. It proved he was a force to be reckoned with, as it collected the best short BAFTA and kicked off Warp Records' film joint, who have birthed some great films including Shane Meadows's "Dead Man's Shoes" and his break-out "This is England." After a brief siesta, Morris decided he was unable to shake the cinema bug, and he finally hit back with the charging farce "Four Lions," which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival to much fervor. Though it certainly feels like his TV background rubbed into the feel of the film, its humor is near impeccable and it offers more depth than your average comedy. We recently sat down with the man behind the very first terrorism-comedy, and after a healthy discussion of Opie and Anthony, Howard Stern, and "Observe and Report," we got down to brass tacks.

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  • eugonline
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    What I'm Watching: "The Flaw"

    A common convention of 'talking head' documentaries can be the cross-cutting of archival footage and bits from old movies to illustrate a point being made by an interview subject. Cutesy clips can make a dry interview more compelling.

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  • Spout
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    Does Rubik's Cube Really Need an Agent? A Look at the Puzzle's Film and TV Career So Far

    I don't know how true this is, but word is going around that the Rubik's Cube has signed with CAA. Speculation is now out that the agency will work towards packaging a feature film based on the iconic puzzle and '80s accessory. Should we expect something where the cube is anthropomorphic, as in the cartoon series "Rubik, the Amazing Cube"? Or a movie set in the years when the Rubik's Cube was a pop culture phenomenon? Will the cube be a prop of some genius? Or will it be a magical contraption, as it is in "Dude, Where's My Car?"

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  • The Playlist
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    Paul Haggis Quietly Working On Global Romantic Drama 'Third Person'

    With his prison escape drama "The Next Three Days" set to hit theaters in a couple of weeks, writer/director Paul Haggis has seen his name linked to a couple of gestating projects. More recently, he's been tapped to adapt and possibly direct the Spanish sensation "Celda 211" and earlier in the year he was linked with Russell Crowe to a big screen version of the 1980s TV series "The Equalizer." However, one project that hasn't been mentioned is one that he's keeping to himself for now.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Oscar Talk: The Way Back, Hollywood Reporter Actress Round-Table

    Oscar Talk: The Way Back, Hollywood Reporter Actress Round-Table

    On this week's Oscar Talk, Kris Tapley and I range over Peter Weir's The Way Back, which I finally screened, as well as the crazy season which is now heating up. We beg to differ on DreamWorks' Animation's Megamind.

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  • Jared Moshé's Blog
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    It's not about winning. It's about governing.

    It's not about winning. It's about governing.

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  • The Playlist
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    In Theaters: 'Due Date,' 'Megamind,' 'For Colored Girls,' '127 Hours'

    With Halloween and all its customary horror movies behind us and long forgotten, this weekend seems to herald open season for awards contenders. Buzzed about awards-seeking films such as Danny Boyle's James Franco starring survival drama "127 Hours" opens in limited release against Tyler Perry's first possible award contender, the star-laden "For Colored Girls." Going head to head in the box office dollars race, lovable funny men Robert Downey Jr. and Zach Galifiankis tackle the road movie in "Due Date," while equally funny people Will Ferrell and Tina Fey lend their vocal talents to the animated "Megamind," for which children and their parents will turn out in droves, undoubtedly. Some interesting docs and smaller indies are also out there for anyone looking to stray off the popcorn-strewn beaten path.

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  • Leonard Maltin
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    film review: Boxing Gym

    The grand old man of cinema vérité-style documentaries, Frederick Wiseman, shows no signs of slowing down, nor has he lost his keen ability to capture the sights, sounds, and overall milieu of his chosen subject. Last year he took us behind the scenes of the Paris Opera’s ballet troupe in La Danse; this year he presents a compelling portrait of life at Lord’s Gym in Austin, Texas.

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