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  • Shadow and Act
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    Vin Diesel Will Play "The Machine" In New MGM Action Comedy

    Mark Sinclair Vincent, aka Vin Diesel will both produce and star in a new MGM action/comedy titled The Machine, penned by the writers of Night at the Museum, and another action/comedy titled The Pacifier, which Da Diesel also starred in by the way. So there's already a relationship there it would appear.

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    More: casting
  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Cinematography in the Digital Age at The Academy, May 24: Navarro, Semler, Deakins, Pfister

    On May 24, the Academy will host "Cinematography in the Digital Age" at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater, with host (and Short Films and Feature Animation Branch governor) Bill Kroyer. Onstage discussions with cinematographers and other industry pros will look at the opportunities and challenges with technological advancements, from visual effects and motion capture to animation. Among those participating are Oscar-winning cinematographers Guillermo Navarro (Pan’s Labyrinth, 2006) and Dean Semler (Dances With Wolves, 1990) as well as How to Train Your Dragon directors Chris Sanders and Dean DeBlois (who will talk about working with cinematographer Roger Deakins on their film), and recorded words from last year's Oscar winning cinematographer, Wally Pfister (Inception).

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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    RS 29—Sibling Rivalry: "You Can Count on Me" vs. "Crimes of the Heart"

    The family has always occupied an oddly supporting role in mainstream American cinema. It clucks disapproval or offers encouragement in romantic comedies/dramas and musicals, perennially playing second fiddle to a heterosexual romance. It exists to be endangered in many westerns and action/adventure films, both humanizing the tough male hero and allowing him to prove his abilities as a masculine protector. Even high-toned prestige pictures frequently view the family solely in terms of the influence it’s had on a single protagonist or couple. The daily experience of living with one’s parents, siblings, and extended relatives—within the same physical space, social network, or emotional/psychological web—is rarely afforded the sole focus of a Hollywood film. Of course, one can pluck out a multitude of exceptions to this rule, from The Magnificent Ambersons to Terms of Endearment to The Family Stone. But even then, the spotlight is largely predicated upon the outsize emotional fireworks or extreme circumstances in which we see them. Movie studios rarely deem the family worthy of primary interest unless the ante is significantly upped: historical significance and material opulence; life-threatening illnesses; and/or skeleton-after-rattling-skeleton yanked out of the closet. (Is it any wonder that so many familial sagas are also crime epics, the rivalries and recriminations made relevant via generous splashes of blood?)

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    More: new issue
  • Shadow and Act
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    Tune In Tonight For A Conversation w/ Tracey Edmonds, President Of Our Stories Films Inc

    In a livecast "extra" session... tonight, at from 8PM to 8:30PM, I'll be chatting with Tracey Edmonds, long-time producer, and now president and chief operating officer of Our Stories Films Inc, the mini film production studio founded by Bob Johnson back in 2006. Our Stories Films Inc is the company behind the recent Jumping The Broom by the way.

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    More: podcast
  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    EXCLUSIVE: Film Fan Story Contest from Film Society of Lincoln Center; Winner Gets Seat

    The Film Society of Lincoln Center announced Thursday a contest to find the ultimate film fan--and drum up some attention for their new state-of-the-art Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, which is set to open officially to the public on June 17, 2011. Open to film audiences worldwide, the Film Society contest will award the winner with a seat at the center, named after them, a friend or loved one.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Production Begins on The Dark Knight Rises

    Production has officially begun for The Dark Knight Rises. A bit over a year from now (July 20, 2012) the film will hit theaters and fans will go wild.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Cannes The Artist Reviews: "A Triumph of Artistic Teleportation, A Big Blast of Pure Delight"

    Cannes The Artist Reviews: "A Triumph of Artistic Teleportation, A Big Blast of Pure Delight"

    Weinstein Co. scooped up French production and last-minute competition entry The Artist before it screened at the fest, and since then it has become a popular title. The Washington Post's Ann Hornaday and I were turned away from one festival screening before I talked us both, as well as LA Weekly's Karina Longworth, into another in the market. It could turn into a worldwide hit, because it's a charmingly accessible Star is Born Hollywood romance set at the same nostalgic turning point as Singing in the Rain: the advent of sound. The film is shot in sparkling black-and-white and it's silent--except for a surging score and a few key percussive moments.

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  • The Lost Boys
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    Inside Out Begins Tonight In Toronto

    A little preview via an interview I did for Xtra:

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    More: Queer
  • The Playlist
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    David Mamet's Gone Right-Wing, Taking On Affirmative Action In Next Screenplay

    Day two of Von Triergate, and... oh, sorry, it's become almost automatic at this point. But enough of directors who haven't actually suddenly displayed right-wing tendencies, how about a director who actually has! David Mamet's always been a controversial figure, since at least his troublesome sexual harassment play "Oleanna." But a shift has started to be seen in his recent work, one explained in full by a lengthy article in the Weekly Standard.

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  • The Lost Boys
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    Read The Roseanne New York Magazine Article If You Haven't Already...

    I decided to remove myself from reading all the Lars von Trier brouhaha and finally took in Roseanne's New York article over lunch today and I have to recommend doing the same if you haven't already. It's one of the most insightful, funny and honest takes on fame, sexism and the television industry I've ever come across... Seriously. Read it here, and long live Roseanne.

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