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  • The Lost Boys
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    So Long, Eugene

    I've already gone as sentimental as I should when his departure was announced last month, but today is the first day of indieWIRE without Eugene Hernandez and it just didn't seem appropriate to let that go by without a little note here. It really truly just ain't going to be same without you.

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  • The Playlist
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    Wes Anderson & Noah Baumbach To Produce New Film By Peter Bogdanovich 'Squirrel To The Nuts'

    Bogdanovich Has Also Finished Screenplay For 'Turn Of The Century'So yes, we're on IndieWire now, which technically means that director and Hollywood encyclopedia Peter Bogdanovich is our colleague (in case you didn't know, he's got a blog), but though we have yet to run into him by the water cooler and ask him if he saw "The Office" last night, it might be because he's been busy working on a couple of new films.

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  • The Lost Boys
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    Happy 39th Birthday, Winona Ryder

    For the fourth time in this blog's history, I have the honor of congratulating my dear Winona Ryder on making it through another year of her conflicted fourth decade. The accidental beard of my boyhood, Ms. Ryder is 39 years old today. And once again, I plea with some casting director out there to take notice of the fabulosity that was her small role in "Black Swan" and give her a role thats beyond some shitty Ron Howard romantic comedy where she plays Kevin James' cheating girlfriend.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    The Horror, The Horror: Seven Rules for Success at the Box Office

    With Halloween upon us, TOH box office analyst Anthony D'Alessandro looks at what's working--and what isn't--among horror genre titles. He finds seven often counter-intuitive rules to follow for horror success.The Paranormal Activity franchise stands as a pillar of success for horror films over the last year, reviving the genre after a recent spate of bombs (i.e. Devil, Case 39, My Soul to Take, Let Me In). What makes a horror title live or die at the B.O.? Here's a primer for horror success: 1. Realism rules: “When you touch death or visceral things like the other world, it makes people feel more alive," says Scream exec producer Harvey Weinstein. "That’s the allure of something like horror.”  Paranormal Activity producer Oren Peli is agreeing all the way to the bank: “What made Paranormal a success is that it feels small and intimate and it was important to stay true to this with the sequel,” he says. “While there are different types of horror films out there, i.e. gore, slasher, the slow psychological build of Paranormal scares people in a different way than being slashed apart.”  

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  • The Playlist
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    The Rumor Mill Churns: Chris Pine As 'The Flash'?

    Or Is His Name Just On A Big Wishlist?How fast do rumors travel these days for ravenous bloggers making mountains out of molehills? Lightning quick. What is tossed off as an aside in a ScreenRant gets picked up the world round and is already building the kind of traction that makes planets spin backwards in lieu of a good, plausible story line.

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  • Spout
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    Exclusive: Official Trailer for Doc NYC Selection "Puppet"

    Whether you know very little or a whole lot about puppets, if you're a fan of Jim Henson or "Being John Malkovich" or are familiar with the "grown-up" artsy puppet work of people like Dan Hurlin, if you have any little interest in or curiosity about the craft and history of puppetry, you should see the new documentary simply titled "Puppet." Directed by David Soll, the film follows the making of Hurlin's 2009 theater production "Disfarmer," which in the documentary becomes a foundation for an examination of the current renaissance of puppet theater and the critical and cultural obstacles the art form continues to face. We also get to learn about the subject of Hurlin's show, Mike Disfarmer, who may until now be best known to film fans as the guy whose photo was used as a stand-in for the Coen brothers' editing pseudonym "Roderick Jaynes" during the 2008 Oscar telecast. And Paul Giamatti's in the film for a minute, too, in case that helps you to see it.

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  • Leonard Maltin
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    maltin on movies: Welcome To The Rileys

    Welcome to the Rileys | Leonard Maltin | Maltin on Movies | Movie Trailer

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  • The Playlist
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    BAMcinématek: Kurosawa’s Samurai, Part 1. (Oct. 29th—Nov. 5th).

    Certainly more creative retrospectives could be assembled from the 30 films Akira Kurosawa made as director, but we suppose even gripping noir like "High and Low" and "Drunken Angel" don't quite carry the iconic stamp this filmmaker’s “Samurai Films” do. And so for their latest program, Brooklyn's BAMcinematek offers up all eight of 'em, providing you an opportunity to see these classics of Japanese cinema on the big screen, perhaps for the first time. The retrospective runs from Oct. 29th to Nov. 21st, and we're taking a two-part look at the films that will be featured there (coincidentally enough, news about the existence of new Kurosawa-penned scripts broke this afternoon). In this entry, we look at those showing in the retro's first leg—Oct. 29th to Nov. 5th—including Kurosawa's most recognizable title, "Seven Samurai" (which will show at BAM twice on Halloween, at 3 and 7). Check back next week when we look at the latter half of the retrospective, which features: the “Kuwabatake Sanjuro” diptych "Yojimbo" and "Sanjuro"; late-period triumph "Ran"; and "Star Wars" inspiration "The Hidden Fortress."

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    A Few Great Pumpkins V—Fifth Night: The X-Files ("Home")

    by cnw

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