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  • The Lost Boys
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    The 2010 Cannes Film Festival Lineup

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  • iW NOW
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  • Eric Kohn
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    Quick Reactions to the Cannes Lineup.

    Quick Reactions to the Cannes Lineup.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Summit Talks Eclipse Reshoots, Sony Denies Bad Hornet Rumors

    Pity the studio corporate flacks who have to keep straightening out the rumors that hit the internet--especially big-name movies that will build traffic as they spread like kudzu. For example, IESB reported that Sony Pictures is apparently "displeased with the results" they've seen so far of Michel Gondry's The Green Hornet film adaptation, citing claims that the "tone is too campy, they're not happy with the work from director Michel Gondry and Seth Rogen does not look the part. At all. In fact, the feeling at Sony is the movie is a disaster."

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Google's Schmidt Talks to Newspaper Editors

    Too few newspapers ask the question "what would Google do?" So the man many consider to be journalism's nemesis, Google CEO Eric Schmidt, addressed the American Society of News Editors in Washington, D.C. this week. While he wants Google to be helpful to the news profession, Schmidt said that the Internet has “replaced the economics of scarcity with economics of abundance and all of us are dealing with the consequences of that.”

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Twitter Chirps, BlackBerry vs. iPhone, iPad vs. WePad

    Twitter is all over the news. Not only is everyone trying to make sense of the just-announced Twitter advertising model and the new Google Follow Finder, but the Library of Congress is acquiring the entire Twitter archive: every tweet ever. That could be a lot of tweets, admits the Library of Congress blog: "Twitter processes more than 50 million tweets every day, with the total numbering in the billions."

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    U.S. Army Closes Afghanistan Outpost Restrepo

    The U.S. Army has finally closed the remote Afghanistan Restrepo outpost in the deadly Korangal Valley, where some 42 American service men have died. Named after a soldier who died in Afghanistan, the post was the setting for Sebastian Junger and Tim Hetherington's unforgettable documentary Restrepo, which debuted at Sundance and will be released in July by National Geographic Films under new president Daniel Battsek.

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  • Jared Moshé's Blog
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  • The Lost Boys
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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    Limits of Vision: Juan Campanella's Oscar-winning (a.k.a. undeserving) "The Secret in Their Eyes"

    The title of the new Argentinean film The Secret in Their Eyes sounds like a crummy Anglicization of a foreign import. Alas, no, it’s a direct translation, and, ultimately, all too fitting for the moth-eaten movie at hand. El Secreto de sus ojos is indeed about the hidden fears, passions, and capital-e Evils one can glean from looking into another’s peepers, be they open and inviting or wide shut. Unfortunately in Juan José Campanella’s film, these windows to the soul reveal little more than superficialities and reflect only hoary movie conventions. Dolorous and self-important in its tendency towards melodrama, this time-jumping portrait of a decades-long murder investigation pales in comparison to the recent, more sobering study of procedural obsession Zodiac, and certainly memories of Memories of Murder, Bong Joon-ho’s unconventionally epic rural mystery, can only serve to expose the breadth of Campanella’s surfaceness. For while The Secret in Their Eyes all but announces its own importance via philosophical inquiries into such titanic matters as life, love, and, of course, revenge, it remains steadfastly banal in its minutiae, too caught up in tired plot mechanisms, self-impressed technical tricks, and, perhaps its worst crime of all, slimy, retrograde sexual politics. Read all of Michael Koresky's review of The Secret in Their Eyes.

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