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  • THE BACK ROW MANIFESTO by Tom Hall
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    Toronto 2010 | RABBIT HOLE

    Toronto 2010 | RABBIT HOLE

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  • ReelPolitik
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    Watch Out Harvey Weinstein: IFC Picks Up Weinstein Expose

    Watch Out Harvey Weinstein: IFC Picks Up Weinstein Expose

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Toronto Faves Client 9 and Inside Job, Waiting for Superman Lead Oscar Docs

    Some of the best films I saw in Toronto were docs, and there's no question that the doc Oscar race will be one of the most competitive in years.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    TIFF Between a Rock and Hard Place: Boyle and Franco Talk 127 Hours

    I interviewed 127 Hours producer Christian Colson and writer Simon Beaufoy, the same team who worked with Danny Boyle on Slumdog Millionaire, just before my flipcam chat with Boyle and James Franco (below).

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  • ReelPolitik
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    Bidding Wars Return to Toronto

    Bidding Wars Return to Toronto

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  • Eric Kohn
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    TIFF '10 Tidbits: "Meek's Cutoff."

    TIFF '10 Tidbits: "Meek's Cutoff."

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    TIFF: Magnolia's Magnet Acquires Kim Jeewoon's I Saw the Devil

    I love the Korean western The Good the Bad and the Weird; Magnet Releasing, Magnolia's genre label, has acquired North American rights to Kim Jewoon's I Saw the Devil. More at indieWIRE.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    IFC Makes Second Toronto Buy: Herzog's Cave of Forgotten Dreams, in 3-D

    IFC Films has acquired all U.S. rights (except TV) to Werner Herzog’s 3-D documentary Cave of Forgotten Dreams, which explores the ancient walls of Chauvet-Pont-d’Arc cave in the south of France. Herzog was able to get access to areas that have been off-limits by deploying special no-heat lights.

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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    TIFF 2010: Essential Killing

    Whoa, Vincent Gallo, look out for that tree! The toppling mighty oak in question is being buzzed down by a grizzled worker, and Gallo, though the only other man in the woods, happens to be in striking distance of it. No matter, it’s just one of many harebrained circumstances in which Gallo finds himself in Jerzy Skolimowski’s latest, Essential Killing, a self-consciously stripped-down action-art survival film. For his part, Gallo, with nary a line of dialogue, is put through the ringer. A fish out of water and an escaped convict tossed from his transport after a Fugitive-like hillside crash, Gallo, in addition to being nearly flattened by that tree, accidentally steps on an open bear trap, has to stab a marauding hunting dog, and eats ants and tree bark for nourishment. Trapped in the middle of nowhere and not knowing the local language, Gallo is forced to rely on his wits and animal-like fury, not to mention adeptness with hunting knives and chainsaws. Essential Killing is a one-man Lord of the Flies. Oh, and did I mention Gallo’s character is named Mohammed and he is an extradited Afghan prisoner en route to an unspecified location for imprisonment?

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  • Spout
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    80s Soundtrack Nostalgia in "Easy A," "Going the Distance" and "Heartbreaker"

    There's an interesting trend I've noticed in recent films, including the rom-coms "Going the Distance" and "Heartbreaker," that culminates (so far as I know) this week with the highly derivative -- but knowingly so -- teen comedy "Easy A." The new movie stars Emma Stone as a girl with such an appreciation for 1980s high school movies that it seems to inadvertently come through in both her dialogue (though her "never had one lesson" remark may have been an intentional "Ferris Bueller" nod) and her social life choices, the latter which turns her into a kind of reverse Ronald Miller (from "Can't Buy Me Love"). The end of the film, without giving too much or anything unexpected away, involves a mashing together of allusions, all of which somewhat require the viewer to have seen the cited '80s films, or at least paid attention during an earlier montage of licensed clips. One of these nostalgic references is an audio of Simple Minds' "Don't You (Forget About Me)" from "The Breakfast Club."

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