Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
Celebrating 17 Years of Film.Biz.Fans.

the Blogs

recent Posts

  • iW NOW
    0 comments

    LAFF's Fast Track Participants and Grant Winners Announced

    LAFF's Fast Track Participants and Grant Winners Announced

    Read More »
  • Thompson on Hollywood
    0 comments

    Film Scholar Brunette Dies at Taormina

    Film academic and critic Peter Brunette died of a sudden heart attack at age 66 Wednesday morning at the Taormina Film Festival. I knew him well. We'd do round tables together at Cannes, share post-screening takes standing by our mail boxes at the Palais, or hang in line at Telluride. He was an infectious film enthusiast, and a canny film writer. He paid for his festival jaunts with freelance income. During the year he was a full-time professor at Wake Forest University, where he was director of their film studies program and published several film books, on Michael Haneke and Wong Kar Wai, among others. I will sorely miss him.

    Read More »
  • Enzian Theater
    0 comments

    Student Oscars' FFF Connection

    Read More »
    More: FFF 10
  • Eric Kohn
    0 comments

    Toy Stories.

    Toy Stories.

    Read More »
  • SydneysBuzz
    0 comments

    Two Recent Passings

    Read More »
  • Matt Dentler's Blog
    0 comments

    Peter Brunette, R.I.P.

    Read More »
  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
    0 comments

    'Core Concerns: The Duplass Brothers' "Cyrus"

    Earlier this year Noah Baumbach’s widely released indie Greenberg represented the first tentative sign that the divisive movement known as Mumblecore was crossing over into the mainstream, as it featured ‘core fixtures Greta Gerwig and Mark Duplass in important roles. But Cyrus—directed and written by Duplass and his brother Jay but distributed by Fox Searchlight; executive produced by another, albeit more famous, pair of filmmaking siblings, Ridley and Tony Scott(!); and starring John C. Reilly, Marisa Tomei, Jonah Hill, and Catherine Keener—leaves no room for doubt: Mumblecore has fully arrived in the larger cultural landscape. This is significant not because it demonstrates that the culture has “caught up with” Mumblecore by paying heed to exciting visions that until now only existed on the margins of American cinema, but because it proves how primed for easy marketability and consumption the movement has been from the word go. Read the rest of Michael Joshua Rowin's review of Cyrus.

    Read More »
  • Thompson on Hollywood
    0 comments

    Crowe Equalizes, Cage and Kidman Trespass, Tempest First Look

    - Russell Crowe is set to play Robert McCall in The Equalizer, the mysterious vigilante agent made famous by Edward Woodward in the 1980s TV show, reports the LAT. Crowe is also attached to Paul Haggis's The Next Three Days, in which his character's wife is wrongly accused of murder. Clearly, Crowe is drawn to characters that have something to fight for, with a few rough edges. The Equalizer currently lacks both a shooting script and a studio, so Crowe has time to brood over this character.

    Read More »
  • Thompson on Hollywood
    0 comments

    Lost in Translation: Lasse Hallstrom to Direct Tom's Dad

    Many directors who come to Hollywood from overseas manage to make the shift from more personal low-budget local films to less personal big-budget studio fare aimed at a worldwide audience. It's tough to pull off the push-pull of studio interference. Filmmakers love playing with a richer tool kit and great actors, but it's hard to hang on to your own voice and steer clear of mass-market blandness.

    Read More »
    More: Directors, News
  • Thompson on Hollywood
    0 comments

    Trailer Watch: Never Let Me Go

    Trailer Watch: Never Let Me Go

    One award-season play for Fox Searchlight this year is Mark Romanek's Never Let Me Go, set for October 1 release. (The trailer is below.) Carey Mulligan, Keira Knightley and Andrew Garfield lead the cast of the film adapted by Alex Garland from the novel by Kazuo Ishiguro (The Remains of the Day). Romanek, who last directed One Hour Photo eight years ago, has much to prove here, following two big-budget studio films that imploded. He left Universal's The Wolf Man over budget issues--a penny-wise, pound-foolish call that the studio regrets in retrospect. And Tom Hanks-starrer Cold Case also fell apart.

    Read More »