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  • THE BACK ROW MANIFESTO by Tom Hall
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  • Matt Dentler's Blog
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    Top 10 Whatever of 2009: Tully, Jones

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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    Best of the Decade #2

    At the heart of the film critical impulse lies the question, what is cinema for? This is central, even if not asked directly, even if the work at hand seems to hold no loftier ambitions than the avoidance of its own calamitous end. The act of writing on a particular film always points to an alternate work that might have been, one that exists only in the critic’s mind. Imagining a better or different object than the one at hand automatically introduces thorny questions of ideals and quintessentials, which in turn lead to purposes and absolutes. And if such a thing as a definitive “for” in cinema can be defined, captured in a bottle, then we also get closer to explaining that other underlying question of all art criticism: Why do we (critics) do what we do? Why all this watching and writing? If cinema can be said to be for anything, then let it be to offer up transformative experiences like The New World. Because if critics are to be consigned to post-facto sideline analysis of artistic achievements and failures, let us, once in a while witness an audacious, singular triumph. Terrence Malick’s fourth film is a rarity: an end, an absolute, a work of art that can’t be imagined better. Read Jeff Reichert on The New World.

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  • eugonline
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    capitola, ca

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    More: photos
  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Holiday Biopics: Young Victoria, Creation, Me and Orson Welles

    Holiday Biopics: Young Victoria, Creation, Me and Orson Welles

    Three period biopics with awards hopes face some tough going over the holidays.

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  • Leonard Maltin
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    Great And Not-So-Great Movies...

    At year’s end it’s traditional to look back and make Ten Best Lists. The problem is that in the flurry of award season—and its attendant hype—one tends to forget how many mediocre films have come and gone, or how many months there seemed to be nothing worth going out to see. I wish I could forget suffering through Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen for two and a half miserable hours, but that’s another story. This was not an outstanding year for moviegoing. That doesn’t mean there wasn’t some excellent work,

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    More: Journal
  • ReelPolitik
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  • Eric Kohn
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    Jib Jab is Still Funny.

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  • Eric Kohn
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    Best of the Decade: Expanding the Arena, Part II.

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  • Leonard Maltin
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    Boris Karloff Tales Of Mystery, Volume One:

    DARK HORSE ARCHIVES; Introduction by Sara Karloff In 1960, Boris Karloff was recruited to host a weekly anthology show called Thriller. It was an obvious attempt to emulate the success of a not dissimilar show hosted by another movie figure with a “brand name,” Alfred Hitchcock. It lasted only two seasons, although Stephen King has called it the best series of its kind, which is no small compliment.

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