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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Warners Cancels 3-D on Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

    In a welcome sign that the studios are recognizing the hazards of retrofit 3-D--even if done well--Warner Bros. is dumping the idea of releasing Deathly Hallows Part I, the penultimate film in the Harry Potter series, in 3-D on November 19. (An IMAX release will proceed.) Smart move--although the studio blames a lack of time for the change in conversion plans. With time to spare, they say they'll still release Part II in 3-D on July 15. I'll believe it when I see it.

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  • Women and Hollywood
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    Jodie Foster Stands Up for Mel Gibson

    Jodie Foster has made her first public statement about her friend Mel Gibson in light of the recent scandal involving his alleged abuse of his ex-girlfriend Oksana Grigorieva.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Sony To Make Videogame Movie Uncharted: Drake's Fortune

    Do they never learn? Even after recent studio duds Prince of Persia and Max Payne, Sony Pictures has signed David O. Russell (Three Kings, The Fighter) to write and direct Columbia's action-adventure Uncharted: Drake’s Fortune. That's because this franchise wannabe is based on a Sony PlayStation 3 game.

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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    NYFF: We Are What We Are

    We Are What We Are opens with an appropriately nauseating sequence underlining its thesis about the wide gulf separating the rich and the poor in contemporary Mexico City. A man, scruffy and stumbling, paws at an upscale storefront’s plate-glass window and the perfectly outfitted mannequins beyond it. An impatient clerk shoos him away. But the man stays put, apparently becoming more unhinged (a looking-into-the-sun shot aligns viewers briefly with his woozy point of view), eventually vomiting what looks like a thick black tar, falling to his knees, and finally gasping his last. His corpse is quickly whisked away, his vomit wiped up by a crack janitorial team, and shoppers resume strolling over the spot where he gave up the ghost, yammering away at a high volume about nothing in particular. It’s an unsettling, if not subtle, statement: a man swept under the rug, his dignity losing out to a society’s imperative of keeping up appearances. Read Benjamin Mercer's review of We Are What We Are.

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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    NYFF: Old Cats

    Old Cats is crammed with the stuff of life—not just the roiling emotions that take up space in its characters’ heads, like regret, anger, neuroses, and occasional joy, but also the literal things that pile up in their houses: books, computers, medicines, and, most of all, tchotchkes. Chilean directors Pedro Peirano and Sebastián Silva’s comic-tinged drama about aging and the deep-seated familial wounds begins with a series of shots of a drab, overstuffed urban apartment visible in gloomy morning light. Its living denizens haven’t yet awoken yet, but its objects seem to be imbued with life, or at least, decades of being collected and displayed have made them integral family members: porcelain felines, glass roosters, wooden carved horses, pillows decorated with unicorns. Everything is quiet, clearly waiting for some force to upend their slumber. Read Michael Koresky's review of Old Cats.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Oscar Talk: Diane Lane vs. Annette Bening vs. Julianne Moore, Inception, Hereafter, The Way Back

    Oscar Talk: Diane Lane vs. Annette Bening vs. Julianne Moore, Inception, Hereafter, The Way Back

    There's still a long way to go in the Oscar race. Kris Tapley and I debate whether Secretariat is this year's mainstream Blind Side, Diane Lane is this year's Sandra Bullock, Julianne Moore and Annette Bening will both make it for The Kids Are All Right, and if Chris Nolan's Inception, John Cameron Mitchell's Rabbit Hole, Martin Scorsese's Shutter Island, Pixar's Toy Story 3, Peter Weir's The Way Back, and Clint Eastwood's Hereafter have a shot at the top ten.

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  • eugonline
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    Hamptons: Schnabel Meets Baldwin

    Hamptons: Schnabel Meets Baldwin

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  • Spout
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    On the Rise: Rooney Mara of "The Social Network"

    Not only is David Fincher's "The Social Network" reaping critical accolades left, right and center, with lofty comparisons being made to everything from "The Godfather" (!) to "Citizen Kane" (!!), but the film is also proving itself to be a breeding ground for Hollywood's brightest stars of the future, with star-making turns from Jesse Eisenberg, a surprisingly credible Justin Timberlake, and future Spidey himself Andrew Garfield. Arguably the biggest talent to emerge from Fincher's Facebook drama is Rooney Mara, who reportedly beat out the likes of Ellen Page and Carey Mulligan, to re-team with Fincher for the role of a lifetime as Lisbeth Salander in the English-language film adaptation of Stieg Larsson's first entry of the "Millennium Trilogy" book series, "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo."

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  • The Lost Boys
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    "A Photographic Examination of Jon Hamm's Salami"

    Thanks to Gawker for ending my Friday off right with this invasive and hilarious investigation of Jon Hamm's bulge. Enjoy!

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