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  • Shadow and Act
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    BET Wants To Reboot "Showtime At The Apollo" w/ Jamie Foxx

    BET plans to reboot Showtime At the Apollo!

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    More: Theater
  • The Playlist
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    Matt Dillon Joins Malin Akerman In Linda Lovelace Biopic 'Inferno'

    Blowjobs: the new being-the-author-of-"In Cold Blood." Last time we had two dueling biographical accounts of a figure's life, we had the two Truman Capote pictures, "Capote" and "Infamous." This time, the subject is Linda Lovelace, the tragic star of the most successful pornographic film of all time, "Deep Throat," who then went on to become an outspoken anti-porn activist. Lovelace was the subject of the 2005 documentary, "Inside Deep Throat," but now a pair of biopics are in the works, with some relatively big names attracted.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Berry Gordy Eying $100 Million Broadway Musical Based On His Life + He's Blocking Marvin Gaye Films?

    Reading THIS piece on the New York Post's website this afternoon, and learned the following: that Motown Records founder Berry Gordy Jr. is indeed developing a Broadway musical based on his life "to set the record straight on the inception of the iconic label."

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  • The Playlist
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    Gaspar Noé May Direct Bret Easton Ellis Script 'The Golden Suicides'

    Considering the horrors that some authors get put through with film adaptations of their work, literary enfant terrible Bret Easton Ellis has been fairly lucky. "Less Than Zero" is fairly decent, while Mary Harron turned out a terrific adaptation of "American Psycho," and even "The Rules of Attraction" has its moments, despite the source material not being very good -- leaving Gregor Jordan's disastrous "The Informers," the film on which the writer made his screenwriting debut, as the only out-and-out failure.

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  • Spout
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    What Does "Bridesmaids" Mean for Women - If Anything?

    Is "Bridesmaids" really a game changer for women, on both sides of the film screen? And is 2011 the year we fight more about depictions of females in film than anything else? The debate over "Sucker Punch" was interesting enough, especially once "Hanna" came in as its supposed answer -- as was to me the odd feminism of "Hall Pass" -- but now we have a comedy that should be more clearly respectful to and of women, and people are still arguing against its significance to gender politics. Because it shouldn't matter. Because angles like Rebecca Traister's claim at Salon last week that seeing the movie is a "social responsibility" for women. Yesterday I saw inklings of a heated discussion on Twitter, but alas that is not the place for great debate. Apparently the proper venue is podcasts, which I guess makes sense, but I've never been one for listening to them. Attempts to comb the blogosphere this morning for interesting contributions to the conversation were met with disappointment. "Tree of Life" is generating too much attention with its own divided responses, apparently.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Check Out These New Images Of Zoe Kravitz In "X-Men: First Class"

    20th Century Fox has released a bunch of new pics from X-Men: First Class. The Matthew Vaughn-directed movie will be in theaters on June 1. A few of those images above and below - notably Zoe Kravitz, who barely features in the trailer. Also, none of Edi Gathegi as Darwin.

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    More: Pics
  • The Playlist
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    Cannes Review: Bruno Dumont's 'Hors Satan' Is Devilishly Dull

    Two-time Cannes Jury Prize winner Bruno Dumont ("Flanders," "L'humanité") returned to Cannes today with his latest head scratcher, "Hors Satan." If Terrence Malick's "The Tree of Life" was a bold exploration into human nature and the search in the universe for God, "Hors Satan" is the dumb, clumsy cousin to that film. Of course, interpretation is everything, but reading between the long static shots, minimal dialogue and brief bursts of "action," Dumont seems to posit that sometimes evil/violence is a necessary corrective in a world where good and evil unfold at will, without anyone holding the scales that keep them balanced.

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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    Monday Hangover: Bridesmaids

    Monday HangoverBridesmaids

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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    RS 29—Death Takes a Holiday: "Hotel Rwanda" and "The Killing Fields"

    The repackaging of real-life atrocities as movie entertainment is historically lucrative, but poses a number of challenges. Roland Joffé’s The Killing Fields and its 2004 successor, Terry George’s Hotel Rwanda, belong to a subgenre (which for the sake of gentle controversy one might call “atrocity porn”) inhabited by the likes of Cry Freedom, Salvador, and Mississippi Burning and lorded over by the granddaddy of them all: Steven Spielberg’s Schindler’s List (unkindly labeled by David Mamet as “Mandingo for Jews”). Such films, inevitably garlanded at awards time, rely on their audiences’ desire to be confronted and emboldened by burning injustice and to have the veil lifted to reveal some (but not all) of the horrors of real-life events which are either too geographically or historically distant to have captured the attention back when they were actually “real life,” or for which TV news provided insufficient dramatization.

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    More: new issue
  • Shadow and Act
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    The First-Ever Academy Awards Were Handed Out Today... How Have Blacks Fared Since Then?

    Today in history... May 16th, 1929... the first Academy Awards, the Oscars, were presented at Hollywood's Roosevelt Hotel; Wings won the award for Best Picture; Emil Jannings for Best Actor; and Janet Gaynor for Best Actress.

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