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  • The Lost Boys
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    Coastal LA In Photos

    Today I had the pleasure of spending my last day in Los Angeles completely offline, and did so by walking along the ocean from Santa Monica to Manhattan Beach. And I have to say it doesn't get much better than that walk mixed with iPod+coffee+cigarettes+camera, the latter of which resulted in the following photographs, most notable for the portion spent in Venice, where I got to meet these characters:

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    #SXSW Perfect Venue for Kick-Ass

    SXSW has a casual young, male vibe. At the Kick-Ass opener, the fest's Janet Pierson and director Matthew Vaughn were both wearing jeans and sneakers. So it makes sense SXSW was perfect venue for Kick-Ass, which has a primarily young male --and less female-- appeal. It's a nasty hard-R super-hero spoof designed to outrage and delight. And it will destroy at the b.o. when Liongsate opens it April. (It opens first in the U.K. in two weeks.)

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Star vs. Star: Remember Me's Pattinson vs. Mother's Won Bin

    TOH columnist Tim Appelo assesses the relative merits of opening weekenders Rob Pattinson and Won Bin:

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Green Zone: New Clip

    It doesn't surprise me that Green Zone is being targeted as a leftie movie. That's because the film--from Brit Paul Greengrass--wears its politics on its sleeve. To me, the film bears the ring of truth, and made me fighting mad. But politics aside, the exhilarating filmmaking alone makes it a must-see.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Time Cover Boy Hanks' The Pacific Launches Sunday on HBO

    I confess: I am at SXSW wishing I had time to watch the DVDs for The Pacific that HBO delivered the day I left town. At $200 million (more than Rome), the ten-part series is the most expensive HBO has ever made, and earned Tom Hanks the cover of Time (like HBO, a Time Warner company). It's the flip side to Hanks and Spielberg's brilliant and harrowing World War II series Band of Brothers, which broke out Damian Lewis.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Gibson and DiCaprio Do Vikings

    Mel Gibson the movie star returned to Hollywood with the routine thriller Edge of Darkness, which grossed a disappointing $42 million domestic. Next up, Gibson takes a riskier acting turn in Jodie Foster's indie The Beaver, about a man who talks to a hand puppet.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    SXSW Preview: Rodriguez, Kick-Ass, Predators

    SXSW Preview: Rodriguez, Kick-Ass, Predators

    Gold Film/Interactive Badge and packet of party tickets in hand, I'm plugged into a power strip in the main courtyard at the Austin Convention Center. (The wi-fi sucks.) On my way downtown, I drove the wrong way onto several one-way streets, including a train track. I am safely parked in the convention lot, which costs $7 a day, but the guy let me in for free when I offered an out-of-state check.

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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    What Makes Her Tick?: Bradley Rust Gray's "The Exploding Girl"

    What will future generations of film folk make of the countless American indies made in the latter half of the twenty-first century’s inaugural decade that follow inarticulate youths as they graze absent-mindedly through overgrown fields of urban anomie? If these films are taken en masse, future sociocultural dissection may yield winning theories about a coddled generation, but on what level will they actually be enjoyed? Every era has its own claim on ennui and spiritual dislocation, especially trendy topics when paired with youthful hesitation and sexual confusion. But often such umbrella terms give unambitious artists license to justify their artistic lethargy on philosophical and aesthetic grounds—if the characters mope, so can the camera; if they’re inarticulate, then why bother writing dialogue? The tenets of realism become a black hole in which one can bury unnecessary details like story, momentum, motivation; staying on the surface equals ambiguity.

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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    Movie of the month: MOTHER; Reverse Shot Direct Address #3: Bong Joon-ho

    Damon Smith talks to Bong Joon-ho (Mother, The Host) about the psychological costs of making better films, the blurring of reality and fantasy, and the drinking habits of Korean auteurs.

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  • iW NOW
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    Murnau's "Sunrise" Returns to NYC

    Murnau's "Sunrise" Returns to NYC

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