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  • iW NOW
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    Newmarket Deal for "Hesher" at Sundance

    Newmarket Deal for "Hesher" at Sundance

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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    Off Peak: Philipp Stölzl’s “North Face”

    The lineage of cinematic mountain climbing extends back to the films of the 1900s. These early efforts evolved into the hugely popular German Bergfilme of the Twenties, the Alpine equivalent of the American Western; in both genres the activities of its characters are circumscribed by features of the landscape. The image of the heroic Aryan mountain climber conquering nature through force of will didn’t go unnoticed by the Third Reich in the 1930s (notably, Leni Riefenstahl began her career starring in Bergfilmes), and the Germanic mythology captured in these works certainly found a ready outlet in the epic pageants of the Nazi era. Aside from Eastwood’s The Eiger Sanction, Cliffhanger is probably the most familiar mountain climbing film to many (though Bergfilme purists are quick to note the ways in which it strays from the mold), but it didn’t do a great deal to resuscitate the genre in the Nineties; the outsized success of the smaller-scaled Touching the Void represents a more accessible reboot for these perilous dramas. Now, German filmmaker Philipp Stölzl (he of the dolorous video for Rammstein’s “Du Hast” and Madonna’s “American Pie”) returns to the wellspring of the Bergfilme to tackle the true story of a pair of young German climbers in 1936, a task fraught both politically and technically. Read Jeff Reichert's review of North Face.

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  • Leonard Maltin
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    Secret's Out - The Hurt Locker

    .syn{font-family:Arial;font-size:11px;padding:5px;width:470px;background:#585858;border-top:1px solid #777777;color:#ccc;} .syn a {color:#ccc;}The Hurt Locker Leonard Maltin's Secret's Out | Movie Trailers

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    #Sundance: Gosling, Cianfrance Talk Blue Valentine

    #Sundance: Gosling, Cianfrance Talk Blue Valentine

    One of the hits of Sundance 2010, Blue Valentine will sell, eventually, and be seen around the country. It features two of the best performances of the year, from Ryan Gosling and Michelle Williams as a couple who are no longer in a working marriage. Writer-director Derek Cianfrance seamlessly weaves together footage of their initial romance and the two teetering on the edge of breaking up. (Here's Karina Longworth's review. )

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  • Peter Bogdanovich
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    Welcome to Blogdanovich

    A couple of people suggested I do a blog about older films. I had no idea what a blog was. A blob? No, blog! Eventually I was guided into the computer world of the 21st century. And I find it’s a very congenial, personal way of communicating with you, where if you’re interested in seeing a movie I’m recommending, you can practically push two buttons and look at the picture, or certainly within a day or so; the same with books I might encourage you to read. It feels more like an intimate one-on-one experience—I’m right here in your own private computer, talking to you.

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  • iW NOW
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    Phase 4 Snatches "Hef"

    Phase 4 Snatches "Hef"

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  • Jared Moshé's Blog
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    State of the Union - no I don't plan to watch it.

    State of the Union - no I don't plan to watch it.

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  • iW NOW
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    Cholodenko's "Kids" Close to Deal

    Cholodenko's "Kids" Close to Deal

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  • iW NOW
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    Jobs Unveils Apple's iPad

    Jobs Unveils Apple's iPad

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    #Sundance: Winterbottom Defends The Killer Inside Me

    #Sundance: Winterbottom Defends The Killer Inside Me

    It's a director's worst nightmare. The night of your world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival, the first questioner from the audience is an outraged woman: "I don't understand how Sundance could book this movie," she said. "How dare you? How dare Sundance?"

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