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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Roberts Talks Eat Pray Love, Tucci Directs Streep, Galifianakis Comedies, Von Trier's Melancholia

    - In this week's Eat Pray Love EW cover story, Julia Roberts reveals that she declined the option to have a spit bucket, preferring to actually eat all of the food during the Eat portion of the film set in Italy. The 7 to 10 pounds Roberts gained was exactly what her character needed to do before moving on to the praying and loving; an authentic rediscovery of her taste for life and abandonment of joyless eating (and living). As for Roberts' working relationship with director Ryan Murphy--a healthy one, since they're working together again --Roberts says "one of the things I love the most about Ryan is that he has a real legitimate answer for everything. There’s nothing that he hasn’t considered weeks before I’ve thought of the question."

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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    Deathly: Aaron Schneider's "Get Low"

    Get Low is based on a true account of a 79-year-old Tennessee bachelor who, in the 1930s, publicly staged his own funeral. According to Sony Pictures Classics’ press package, the “classic American yarn” about Felix Bushaloo Breazeale’s funeral is “an American folktale passed down by storytellers for decades, spreading across distance and time to take on a larger-than-life legend.” I’m not familiar with this tale (or with the existence of any great oral tradition in the modern South), but a Google search affirms that Breazeale was profiled in several newspapers in 1938 and invited as a guest on Ripley’s Believe It or Not! on NBC radio the following year. A similar affair was attempted with disastrous results down in Miami in 1992, when one Sophia Petrillo decided to host a living-wake party and put her scatterbrained roommate in charge of the invitations (guess which of the Golden Girls forgot to tell everybody Sophia wasn’t really dead!).

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  • Jared Moshé's Blog
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    More Cool Videos! (because I'm too busy in the edit room)

    More Cool Videos! (because I'm too busy in the edit room)

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  • JUMP CUTS by James Israel
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    New Thor vs old Thor - whew

    "Thor" SDCCUploaded by ThePlaylist.

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    More: Geekery
  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Venice Line-up Heavy on Americans: Coppola, Schnabel, brothers Affleck

    Venice has announced the rest of its line-up. Besides Darren Aronofsky's opener Black Swan (in competition) and the closer from Julie Taymor, The Tempest (out of competition), the fest is world premiering a number of North American titles. As expected the competition entries include Sofia Coppola's Somewhere, Julian Schnabel's Miral, and Richard Lewis's Barney's Version, a rare debut for a Canadian film in Venice.

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  • iW NOW
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    Chicken & Egg Pictures Announces Women Filmmaker Grant List

    Chicken & Egg Pictures Announces Women Filmmaker Grant List

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  • Spout
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    "Inception" Guides and Parodies

    I'm still waiting for a proper trailer mashup of "Inception" and "Shutter Island," one that truly integrates them and wasn't made before either film came out. It's likely one will show up eventually. A number of other parodies and trailer mashups have been pouring in since the film became a pop sensation. There is an okay redo of the "Toy Story 3" trailer with the audio from the "Inception" trailer. Yet it's fairly uninteresting as anything other than a random mix of the summer's two best releases. Then there's the mashup between "Inception" and "Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure" (via FilmDrunk), which I like because it features dialogue from the latter and because it slightly makes a nod to the more appropriate connection to "The Matrix" by working with an otherwise unrelated Keanu Reeves movie. Still, is the point that time travel does exist...in dreams?

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Comic-Con: Let Me In is Vampire Coming-of-Age Story with Red Band Trailer

    Comic-Con: Let Me In is Vampire Coming-of-Age Story with Red Band Trailer

    One of the more impressive show-reels at Comic-Con was for the vampire thriller Let Me In (the remake of Let the Right One In) directed by Cloverfield's Matt Reeves. Overture Films will open the film October 1, and thanks to new owner Relativity Media, marketing chief Peter Adee assures me, the film will get a proper release. With proper handling it could become a mainstream hit, judging from the reaction in Hall H. The new Red Band trailer is posted below.

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  • Spout
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    "Titanic II" is No Longer Just a Bad Joke. Film Blog Water Cooler 7/28/10

    Thanks to the Internet, we've seen plenty of fake posters and trailers for non-existent sequels to James Cameron's "Titanic" (happy belated 100th birthday to Gloria Stuart, by the way). Now thanks to the existence of The Asylum, the production company that brought us "Transmorphers," "The Da Vinci Treasure" and "Snakes on a Train," we have the chance to see an actual film called "Titanic II." Of course, it's not officially linked to the 1997 blockbuster as a sequel or otherwise. The title actually refers to the name of a new ocean liner that's been built to honor the original ship and will make its maiden voyage on the 100th anniversary of the Titanic's tragic one and only trip.

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  • Spout
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    5 Surprisingly Good Remakes of French Comedies

    What do Martin Short, Ted Danson, Nick Nolte and Robin Williams have in common? Each has starred in at least two remakes -- that's two apiece -- of French comedies (Williams has done three). And none of these are as good as the original. Of course it's not unusual for a remake to be worse than the first film, but there's a special consideration to be made regarding Hollywood's translations of French comedy in particular. They tend to be bad even for remakes. They tend to be bad even for films that are bad for remakes. Here are some examples: "Father's Day," "Pure Luck," "Taxi," "My Father the Hero," "Jungle 2 Jungle." Even when a filmmaker handles his own remake, as Roger Vadim ("And God Created Woman"), Jean-Marie Poire ("Just Visiting") and Francis Veber ("Three Fugitives") have done, the result is typically awful.

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