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Reviews

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    REVIEW | Tomb of the Mommy: Azazel Jacobs's "Momma's Man"

    Considering that Azazel Jacobs, the director of "Momma's Man," is the offspring of American avant-garde filmmaker extraordinaire Ken Jacobs, one would be forgiven for expecting his film to be more experimental and abstract than the seemingly conventional narrative that plays out. Yet buried beneath ...

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    REVIEW | Split Ends: Claude Chabrol's "A Girl Cut in Two"

    At first glance, Claude Chabrol's latest seems yet another in his long line of slow-boiling thrillers, set mostly amongst the upper classes, in which the sinister bobs up above a seemingly placid surface -- compulsively watchable and strangely unsettling, sure, but par for the course for the erstwhi...

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    REVIEW | Pale Fire: Woody Allen's "Vicky Cristina Barcelona"

    Each review of a new, annual Woody Allen film needn't require an overarching, state-of-his-art introduction, but it's hard to fight the urge to do so. The fact that, even at this late stage in his career, America's most prolific just-off-mainstream filmmaker instigates such charged responses from so...

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    REVIEW | Age of Consent: Isabel Coixet's "Elegy"

    In what may be a perfect sophisto storm, none other than Sir Ben Kingsley plays Philip Roth's academic antihero David Kepesh, a solemn piano underscoring his negotiations with sex, art, and mortality in the Continental Manhattan of Isabel Coixet's new film, "Elegy." Kepesh teaches literature at Colu...

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    REVIEW | Circle Jerk: Rodger Grossman's "What We Do Is Secret"

    The world certainly isn't wanting for hagiographies of Seventies punk-rock trailblazers, but rarely has one felt as inauthentic as Rodger Grossman's feature debut, "What We Do Is Secret." Grossman short-changes his subject by framing the tragic, brief musical career and suicide of the Germs' front m...

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    REVIEW | Corked: Randall Miller's "Bottle Shock"

    In "Bottle Shock," director and co-scripter Randall Miller -- of such disparate (and dismal) output as the Sinbad-starring "Houseguest" and painfully twee indie "Marilyn Hotchkiss Ballroom Dancing and Charm School" -- seemingly extrapolates Virginia Madsen's centerpiece soliloquy on wine from "Sidew...

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    REVIEW | Sweatin' to the Oldies: Darryl Roberts's "America the Beautiful"

    Opening with "vintage" black-and-white footage of women from the Fifties huffing and puffing through antiquated exercise routines, set to Bruce Channel's "Hey, Baby," the ostensible investigative documentary "America the Beautiful" establishes its de-facto glibness within seconds. Throughout the cou...

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    REVIEW | Soft Shoe: Alex Holdridge's "In Search of a Midnight Kiss"

    From "Sunset Boulevard" to "Mulholland Drive" and beyond, most movies revolving around Hollywood hopefuls portray the greater Los Angeles area as a soulless cesspool into which the hordes can't help but sink. But in his Tinseltown-set feature "In Search of a Midnight Kiss," Alex Holdridge reimagine...

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    REVIEW | Dropped Ball: Paul Weiland's "Sixty-Six"

    There is a certain class of British film -- for which John Boorman's "Hope and Glory" is perhaps the prototype -- which follows an adolescent boy's coming of age during a notable or sentimentality-laced period of twentieth-century English history. Invariably in such films, there is a female object o...

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    REVIEW | Carnival of Old Souls: Margaret Brown's "The Order of Myths"

    It may come as something of a shock to most that in Mobile, Alabama, a culturally sanctified segregation still exists. And documentary filmmaker Margaret Brown must be relying on that shock from viewers of her exacting new film "The Order of Myths," even if it resolutely avoids sensationalism or pol...

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