Death Watch

Roddy has a camera implanted in his brain. He is then hired by a television producer to film a documentary of terminally ill Katherine, without her knowledge. His footage will then be run on the popular TV series, “Death Watch”.

La Princesse de Montpensier

1562, la France est sous le règne de Charles IX, les guerres de religion font rage… Depuis son plus jeune âge, Marie de Mézières aime Henri, Duc de Guise. Elle est contrainte par son père d’épouser le Prince de Montpensier. Son mari, appelé par Charles IX à rejoindre les princes dans leur guerre contre les protestants, la laisse en compagnie de son précepteur, le Comte de Chabannes, loin du monde, au château de Champigny. Elle tente en vain d’y oublier sa passion pour Guise, mais devient malgré elle l’enjeu de passions rivales et violentes auxquelles vient aussi se mêler le Duc d’Anjou, futur Henri III.

The Princess of Montpensier

Bertrand Tavernier (“’Round Midnight”) directs this lush, unsentimental take on the historical romance, which takes a clear-eyed look at the intersection of passion and power in 16th-century France. Young, beautiful aristocrat Marie favors war hero Henri, but she’s married off to the Prince of Montpensier for political reasons. Once at court, she inspires love, violence, and thirst for power in the men around her as civil war tears the country apart. [Synopsis courtesy of Chicago Film Festival]

The French Minister

Arthur (Raphaël Personnaz), a graduate of all the right schools, is the new speechwriter for the Minister of Foreign Affairs (a hilarious Thierry Lhermitte). While he tries to navigate internal politics, the various strong personalities around him (such as a ruthless policy advisor played by Julie Gayet), and the stress of finding the Minister’s “voice,” Arthur must also write a speech for the Minister that will hopefully put them both in the history books. Based on co-screenwriter Antonin Baudry’s own graphic novels about his experience working in the Foreign Ministry under former Foreign (and Prime) Minister Dominique de Villepin, The French Minister takes us for a breathless ride through the halls of French government. [Synopis courtesy of Film Society Lincoln Center]