Ned Rifle

American indie icon Hal Hartley completes the trilogy he began with Henry Fool and Fay Grim with this delightfully offbeat tale about Henry and Fay’s teenage son Ned, who emerges from a witness protection program with a single, fixed purpose: to kill his father for ruining his mother’s life. [Synopsis courtesy of Toronto International Film Festival]

My America

21 monologues written by American playwrights form a sort of fractured portrait of the American collective psyche. Ranging from the sad to the hilarious, from the angry to the tentatively celebratory, many of the major and recurrent issues associated with our fraught but beloved union are reconsidered with elegance, wit, brutal honesty, and a little outright insanity.


Meanwhile concerns Joe Fulton, a man who can do anything from fixing your sink to arranging international financing for a construction project. He produces online advertising and he’s written a big fat novel. He’s also a pretty good drummer. But success eludes him. For Joe can’t keep himself from fixing other people’s problems. His own ambitions are constantly interrupted by his willingness and ability to go out of his way for others.