The Tempest

The Tempest, based on the play of the same name by William Shakespeare, is written and directed by Julie Taymor. The play’s main character was Prospero, and Taymor changed the character’s gender to cast Helen Mirren as Prospera. In Shakespeare’s play, Prospero was the Duke of Milan. In the adaptation, Prospera is the wife of the duke. She is “more overtly wronged” than Prospero; when the duke is killed, his brother Antonio (played by Chris Cooper) accuses her of killing him with witchcraft. Antonio makes the accusation to rid of Prospera and claim her royal title. Taymor said, “She had her whole life taken away from her because she was a woman.” Prospera wants to prevent the same thing from happening to her daughter

Across the Universe

Musical based on The Beatles songbook and set in the 60s England, America, and Vietnam. The love story of Lucy and Jude is intertwined with the anti-war movement and social protests of the 60s.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Of all Shakespeare’s plays, A Midsummer Night’s Dream is the most phantasmagorical, with fairies, spells, and hallucinatory lovers. His flights of fancy are well matched to the talents of Julie Taymor, who turns out a production that’s visually breathtaking, funny, sexy, and darkly poetic. This immersive, inventive cinematic experience took place during Taymor’s highly acclaimed inaugural stage production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the new Polonsky Center in Brooklyn, New York in 2013. Characteristic of Taymor, the feats of visual imagination are ingenious and plentiful, but beating at the centre of the film is an emotionally moving take on the deeper human aspects of this beloved tale. Having gone from experimental theatre to rejuvenating the Broadway musical with The Lion King, Taymor repeatedly takes risks on films, from Frida and Across the Universe to Titus and The Tempest. In A Midsummer Night’s Dream, she displays her creative powers in their peak form. [Synopsis courtesy of Toronto International Film Festival]


Titus Andronicus returns from the wars and sees his sons and daughters taken from him, one by one. Shakespeare’s goriest and earliest tragedy.