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Interviews

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    Defying Categorizations Yet Again, Neil Jordan on "Breakfast on Pluto"

    Here's a shape-shifting filmmaker almost impossible to pigeonhole. After some fifteen films, Irish-born Neil Jordan is still most closely linked with his Oscar-winning masterwork, "The Crying Game" (1992), which meshes mysterious sexuality with the Anglo-Irish "Troubles," and uncorks that twist that...

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    Tackling A Classic: Joe Wright on "Pride and Prejudice"

    So who is this Joe Wright, anyway? One thing's for sure: the director of the hot Brit film "Pride and Prejudice" doesn't come across as very Jane Austen: working class/Cockney accent, floppy hair shoved under a beret, punk good looks. He claims he was dyslexic as a child and has "a lot of catching u...

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    5 Questions for Susan Kaplan, director of "Three of Hearts"

    For more than a year now, Susan Kaplan's "Three of Hearts" -- the story of a 'trinogomous' relationship between two men and a woman -- has been receiving overwhelming acclaim on the film festival circuit. Kaplan explores what might seem like a sensational subject in "Three of Hearts: A Postmodern Fa...

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    5 Questions for Tim Kirkman, Directors of "Loggerheads"

    When we last checked in with Tim Kirkman, back at Sundance this year, he was anticipating his first trip to the Park City festival. At his first screening, he clutched a small camera and snapped a shot of the audience. At age 38, after making a pair of feature docs and even working for years at Mira...

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    Shoot to Kill: Im Sang-soo Gets Down and Dirty With Politics in "The President's Last Bang"

    Aside from Lars von Trier's blowsy America-trashing "Manderlay," "The President's Last Bang," directed by controversy-magnet Im Sang-soo, was the most controversial entry in the 43rd New York Film Festival. Or at least it would have been, if American audiences had even the most passing knowledge of recent Korean politics. "Last Bang" tracks the final 12 hours in the life of Park Chung-hee, the former tyrannical president of South Korea who rose to power in 1961 following a military coup--and was murdered by the Kim Jaekyu, director of the Korean Central Intelligence Agency (KCIA), on October 26, 1979. This monumental incident is played for gr...

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    Making The Personal Universal: Noah Baumbach on "The Squid and the Whale"

    'My Parents' Divorce' would not, on the face of it, seem the freshest subject for a film. Yet in his third feature, "The Squid and the Whale," Noah Baumbach molds this familiar material into a searing character study marked by telling detail and emotional veracity. At 2005 Sundance (where adolescent...

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    Down in the Delta; Ira Sachs Plays "Forty Shades of Blue"

    While regional filmmakers were all the rage at Sundance this year (from "Hustle and Flow" to "Junebug"), Ira Sachs' top prizewinner "Forty Shades of Blue" feels like it comes from another planet. Whether it's the France of Maurice Pialat and Raoul Coutard, the Germany of Rainer Werner Fassbinder or ...

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    The Classic American Tragedy of Bennett Miller's "Capote"...And It's True

    In his austere, remarkably confident first dramatic feature, "Capote," Bennett Miller tackles the biopic from a fresh angle. Instead of tracing the standard soup-to-nuts arc, he and writer Dan Futterman zero in on the six year period Truman Capote devoted to researching "In Cold Blood," the pioneeri...

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    On the Edge: Lodge Kerrigan Talks Collapse and Chance in "Keane"

    With his latest picture "Keane," Lodge Kerrigan reaffirms the maverick mantle he established over ten years ago with his 1994 debut "Clean, Shaven." As unnerving and concise as his celebrated bow, "Keane" is also a more full-bodied and emotionally harrowing expression of Kerrigan's talents. Starring British actor Damian Lewis (in a riveting performance) as the title character William Keane, the film stalks its protagonist -- as he reels from the abduction of his young daughter -- with the tightly observed, hand-held camerawork reminiscent of the Dardenne brothers ("Rosetta," "The Son"). A visceral exercise in post-9-11 anguish, a bravura use ...

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    Making A Family Sex Comedy: A Conversation with Olivier Ducastel and Jacques Martineau

    For several years, Olivier Ducastel and Jacques Martineau have been writing and directing distinctive films that take a sunny disposition on what are generally serious issues. Their first collaboration, "The Adventures of Felix," is about a gay man who leaves his lover to find a makeshift family on ...

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