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Locarno International Film Festival

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    Locarno Film Festival Review: Dracula Meets Casanova In Albert Serra's Bizarrely Fascinating 'The Story of My Death'

    The title of Spanish director Albert Serra's four feature, "The Story of My Death," presents a sardonic riff on 18th century Italian Renaissance man Giacomo Casanova. His memoir, "Story of My Life," recounts his lively travels across Europe and encounters with fellow luminaries of his era like Volta...

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    Locarno Film Festival Review: 'The Strange Color Your Body's Tears,' From the Directors of 'Amer,' Is An Uneasy Assault On the Senses

    A loud, visually assaultive assemblage of genre tropes as technically accomplished as it is difficult to watch, "The Strange Color of Your Body's Tears" has plenty to impress while simultaneously offering so little. The movie depicts the Kafkaesque experiences of a baffled man seemingly trapped in h...

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    Locarno Film Festival Review: Joanna Hogg's 'Exhibition' Suggests Michael Haneke By Way of Miranda July

    Joanna Hogg's "Exhibition" closes with a dedication to architect James Melvin, an appropriate coda whether or not viewers recognize the name. Hogg's third feature magnifies the relationship between people and the spaces they live in with a keen eye for the way the two tend to blend together. At its ...

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    Locarno Film Festival Review: Filled With Heavy Drinking and Soul-Searching, Hong Sang-soo's Bittersweet Dramedy 'Our Sunhi' Is an Ideal Entry Point to the Director's Work

    There are many variations on the Hong formula. In the past five years, he has completed eight features, including two that have premiered this year alone: Following the Berlin Film Festival entry "Nobody's Daughter Haewon," Hong has unveiled "Our Sunhi," his most enjoyable work since "In Another Cou...

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    Locarno Film Festival Review: Free Love Commune Chatter and Heavy Metal Define Ben Rivers and Ben Russell's Lyrically High-Minded 'A Spell to Ward Off the Darkness'

    There's nothing remotely like a story in "A Spell to Ward Off the Darkness," experimental directors Ben Rivers and Ben Russell's patient, lyrical three-act look at a quiet man's journey through three different phases in life, but it's littered with big ideas. Rivers and Russell have toured together ...

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    Faye Dunaway Explains the Delay On Her Directorial Debut 'Master Class' At the Locarno Film Festival

    Early last year, Dunaway acknowledged that shooting was currently underway on Twitter, sharing photos from the set and singing the praises of her son Liam Dunaway O'Neill and Danielle de Niese, calling their performances "electric." Then came radio silence: While IMDb and Wikipedia both suggest the ...

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    Locarno Film Festival Review: Romanian Cinema In Its Purest Form With 'Police Adjective' Director Corneliu Porumboiu's Self-Reflexive 'When Evening Falls on Bucharest or Metabolism'

    Anyone following trends in world cinema over the past decade has noticed the emerging stylistic tendencies of the Romanian New Wave, which gained a boost of publicity in 2008 with the acclaimed "4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days," one of several Romanian films to show a penchant for long takes and real t...

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    Locarno Film Festival Review: How Joaquim Pinto's 'What Now? Remind Me' Turns a Three Hour Portrait of Living With AIDS Into Cinematic Art

    The first image of "What Now? Remind Me," Portuguese film industry veteran Joaquim Pinto's 164-minute portrait of his one-year experience taking experimental medication for AIDS and Hepititus-C, sets the tone perfectly: In a lush extreme close-up, a grey slug oozes across the screen, its pores magni...

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    Locarno Film Festival Review: A Peruvian Lawman Loses His Voice and Takes Revenge In Daniel and Diego Vidal's 'The Mute'

    Peruvian directors Daniel and Diego Vidal's debut feature "October" was a minor hit on the festival circuit in 2011 that was noteworthy for its unique application of deadpan comedy to the unlikely backdrop of lower class world of loan sharks and prostitutes. The sibling filmmakers' followup similarl...

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